Fashion group Puig snaps up Charlotte Tilbury’s beauty empire

Executives at Puig have acquired a majority stake of Charlotte Tilbury’s beauty empire.The British make-up artist launched her namesake cosmetics company and skincare brand back in 2012, with the line including a range of popular lipsticks and foundati…

Executives at Puig have acquired a majority stake of Charlotte Tilbury’s beauty empire.

The British make-up artist launched her namesake cosmetics company and skincare brand back in 2012, with the line including a range of popular lipsticks and foundations.

Now, Tilbury has confirmed that she has sold her business to the team at the Barcelona-based fashion and perfume conglomerate.

“I’ve always dared to dream and create magic through beauty. I’m proud to be joining forces with Puig in a strategic partnership that will help us achieve our limitless ambitions,” the 47-year-old commented. “We’ve reached a pivotal point in our growth since launching seven years ago, and we’re looking forward to unlocking new opportunities with Puig, which is the perfect partner as we build an iconic brand to last.”

Despite rolling over a significant majority stake to Puig, Tilbury will remain as chairman, president, and chief creative officer of the company.

And a spokesperson for the firm is thrilled to have completed the deal.

“Puig and Charlotte Tilbury, two privately owned companies, have a strong connection through their shared core values, including creative storytelling, an entrepreneurial mindset and a sincere passion for empowering people through beauty,” they said. “The acquisition of a majority stake in Charlotte Tilbury will add an established and rapidly-growing makeup and skincare brand to Puig existing portfolio of fashion, fragrance and luxury beauty brands. Charlotte Tilbury also will be able to access Puig global footprint and operations to expand its worldwide presence.”

Puig bosses oversee the Nina Ricci, Carolina Herrera, and Paco Rabanne brands, with the company also the majority shareholder of Jean Paul Gaultier.

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Olivier Theyskens named creative director of Azzaro

Olivier Theyskens has been appointed the creative director of French fashion house Azzaro.The Belgian designer launched his namesake brand back in 1998, but shuttered the line after four years to take up stints at Rochas, Nina Ricci, and Theory. Theysk…

Olivier Theyskens has been appointed the creative director of French fashion house Azzaro.

The Belgian designer launched his namesake brand back in 1998, but shuttered the line after four years to take up stints at Rochas, Nina Ricci, and Theory.

Theyskens rebooted his own label in 2016, and after several seasons showing in Paris, he has now been tapped by bosses to reinvigorate the company founded by Loris Azzaro in 1967.

“Loris Azzaro left behind a considerable, very inspiring legacy,” he said in a statement. “I am excited, thrilled and honoured to have the opportunity of bringing my vision to this legendary, iconoclastic House, for which freedom and pleasure remain ever-as-contemporary founding values. I would like to carry on this atypical universe through my collections while infusing them with my own perspective.”

Theyskens, known for his dark yet romantic aesthetic and use of the colour black, will unveil his debut line for Azzaro during Paris Couture Week in July.

In addition to overseeing the brand’s workshop in the French capital, he will continue to work on collections for his own fashion house.

Accordingly, Azzaro’s chief executive officer, Gabriel de Linage, is excited to see what the 43-year-old brings to the label.

“His renowned talent, experience and creative vision will empower the house’s future with spirit and sparkle,” he praised. “Olivier Theyskens has a unique ability to immerse himself in a legacy and to revisit it in a contemporary verve. His fondness for asserted sensuousness and the flowing contrasts of materials and cuts naturally echo the style of Loris Azzaro and his emblematic muses. We are thrilled to welcome him to our house and to our historical workshops.”

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Claudia Cardinale set to auction off iconic couture dresses

Iconic Italian actress Claudia Cardinale is putting her collection of couture dresses up for auction at Sotheby’s Paris.The Leopard actress is gearing up to exhibit over 130 looks on 9 July and is thrilled to have the garments finally showcased. “It’s…

Iconic Italian actress Claudia Cardinale is putting her collection of couture dresses up for auction at Sotheby’s Paris.

The Leopard actress is gearing up to exhibit over 130 looks on 9 July and is thrilled to have the garments finally showcased.

“It’s very moving to see them here,” she told WWD. “They had been stuck in storage in my parents’ home in Rome for years and years. I didn’t remember them being so beautiful.”

The collection spans the first 20 years of the brunette beauty’s screen career, and features pieces from her roles in Federico Fellini’s 8 1/2 and Blake Edwards’s The Pink Panther. Among the pieces is a Nina Ricci printed dress from 1967 with a low-cut back.

“I didn’t like to show my cleavage. I refused all the low-cut dresses,” the 81-year-old shared. “So, this was obviously my way around it.”

Cardinale’s many miniskirts are also among the offerings.

“I was one of the first to wear Mary Quant’s miniskirts,” she said. “I even wore one to meet the Pope in the Sixties.”

While Cardinale’s art historian daughter Claudia Squitieri, who is helping to prepare for the event, commented that items such as miniskirts represent a “form of emancipation”.

“The silhouettes from the ’50s are quite plain, with a lot of girly and demure dresses,” she added. “You can tell they belonged to someone who was still a bit fragile with not a lot of freedom of choice. And then you feel there is a real moment at the end of the ’60s, when my mother became a lot more emancipated and allowed herself to experiment with more colour and styles, such as flared pants. The collection represents a transition from one era to another.”

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Isabel Marant shows off safari chic for fall 19

Isabel Marant has dished up a line of safari-inspired separates for fall/winter 2019.The French fashion house, founded in 1994 by designer Isabel Marant, presented as part of Paris Fashion Week on Thursday night (01Mar19), with the likes of Constance J…

Isabel Marant has dished up a line of safari-inspired separates for fall/winter 2019.

The French fashion house, founded in 1994 by designer Isabel Marant, presented as part of Paris Fashion Week on Thursday night (01Mar19), with the likes of Constance Jablonski, Isabeli Fontana, and Derek Blasberg all perched on the front row.

While Marant is known for her signature Parisian chic aesthetic, for her latest collection she took fans on an adventure, with the show opening with a model sporting a large grey trench coat with matching slouchy grey leather boots.

A number of similar ensembles with a nomadic feel followed, including a beige jumpsuit which was paired with a studded black leather belt, and a wool-lined vest which was matched with a star-printed shirt and trousers with cargo-style pockets.

Model of the moment Kaia Gerber walked the runway in an oversized off-white knit sweater and high-waisted trousers, with her look accessorised with silver feather detailing, large silver drop earrings, and black leather booties.

Reflecting her eclectic taste, Marant also offered up shirts and skirts in mismatched paisley prints, sweaters with geometric designs, wool vests, and cosy jackets.

Gigi Hadid strutted her stuff in a grey jacket with large pockets on the front and beige cargo pants which were tucked into grey boots, while Binx Walton donned beige shorts and a large jacket with brown leather detailing.

To conclude the presentation, Marant added in a few more evening-ready outfits, including black and silver knitwear tops, ’80s-inspired high-neck jumpers, pleated miniskirts, black and silver minidresses, and sequin skirts with dramatic black tops.

Paris Fashion Week continues on Friday with shows from Loewe, Balmain, Nina Ricci, and Celine.

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Nina Ricci hires new artistic directors

Dutch designers Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh have been appointed as the new artistic directors of Nina Ricci.The pair will succeed French designer Guillaume Henry, who left his position at the Paris-based fashion house in March (18), and will pre…

Dutch designers Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh have been appointed as the new artistic directors of Nina Ricci.

The pair will succeed French designer Guillaume Henry, who left his position at the Paris-based fashion house in March (18), and will present their first collection during the pre-fall 2019 season, before debuting their fall line in March 2019 as part of the official Paris Fashion Week calendar.

As the duo behind Caribbean-infused menswear brand, Botter, Herrebrugh and Botter took home the Premiere Vision Grand Prize at the Hyeres International Festival of Fashion and Photography, and drew interest from several major labels after reaching the final of this year’s edition of the LVMH Prize for Young Designers.

Jose Manuel Albesa, president of brands, markets and operations at Puig, the Spanish fragrance and fashion conglomerate that owns Nina Ricci, believes the creatives will bring “a big dose of coolness” to the label.

“We were looking for someone unique. They did some sketches to show their vision for the brand, and I was really amazed because it was not an evolution, it was a revolution,” he told WWD, adding that Botter and Herrebrugh, who grew up on the islands of Curacao and Dominican Republic, respectively, have a “kind of Caribbean joie de vivre”.

The double act’s new positions are effective immediately, and they will relocate from Antwerp to Paris in September.

Commenting on the gig, they said they “feel very inspired by the fresh, feminine and subtle codes that make Nina Ricci such a beautiful ode to femininity. We aim to create a new spirit, a spirit of our times, effortless yet sophisticated, strong yet positive.”

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Guillaume Henry departing Nina Ricci

Guillaume Henry is leaving Nina Ricci after a three-year stint as creative director.Rumours swirled during Paris Fashion Week earlier this month (Mar18) that the French designer was set to depart the luxury house, though brand bosses rebuffed the specu…

Guillaume Henry is leaving Nina Ricci after a three-year stint as creative director.

Rumours swirled during Paris Fashion Week earlier this month (Mar18) that the French designer was set to depart the luxury house, though brand bosses rebuffed the speculation.

However, representatives confirmed on Thursday that Henry is exiting the company.

“After three years of mutually gratifying creative collaboration, Nina Ricci and Guillaume Henry have together decided that the designer will depart the House after the presentation of the fall-winter 2018-19 collection,” they said, referring to the show held on 2 March.

Until Henry’s replacement is employed, upcoming collections will be designed by team members at the label’s in-house studio. In his final range for Ricci, the designer offered up military-inspired coats, capes, camisoles made in metallic fabrics and slinky slip dresses.

Henry studied at the Institut Francais de la Mode before working for the likes of Givenchy, Paule Ka, and Carven, where he acted as creative director from 2009 until 2014. Henry was appointed to the top role at Ricci in January 2015, succeeding Peter Copping, and winning over a number of A-list fans including Gigi Hadid, Beyonce Knowles and Queen Letizia of Spain.

Other designers to previously helm the Paris-based label include Lars Nilsson and Olivier Theyskens.

The fashion house was founded by Maria ‘Nina’ Ricci in 1932, and has been owned by Spanish fashion conglomerate Puig, which also operates the Carolina Herrera and Paco Rabanne brands.

Editors at WWD have reported that Henry’s exit was a consequence of his frustration over investment in Ricci by Puig executives. However, chief executive officer Marc Puig previously told the fashion publication that they were focusing on “organic” growth.

“The way we see it, there’s a portfolio with a significant number of brands already, and within those brands there is the potential to keep growing in different (categories), whether it’s fragrance or fashion,” he shared.

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Nina Ricci denies Guillaume Henry is leaving

Nina Ricci representatives have denied creative director Guillaume Henry is exiting the brand.WWD reported on Thursday (01Mar18) that Henry was stepping down from his design post at the French label, but bosses at the brand have released a statement re…

Nina Ricci representatives have denied creative director Guillaume Henry is exiting the brand.

WWD reported on Thursday (01Mar18) that Henry was stepping down from his design post at the French label, but bosses at the brand have released a statement rebutting the claims.

“House of Nina Ricci refutes the news released today on the press about the creative director Guillaume Henry leaving Nina Ricci,” the said. “All the information stated within the news are pure speculation that do not respond to reality. Any significant information about the brand is always addressed by the Nina Ricci press office.”

While Henry is yet to comment, WWD was told by an industry insider that the designer had grown frustrated by parent company Puig’s slowness to plug money into the label.

“He did not want to continue without guarantees that they would invest,” the source commented.

The French designer has been at the helm of Nina Ricci for just over three years, succeeding Peter Copping in the role.

Prior to that, he earned his fashion stripes at Carven.

Nina Ricci will be showing at Paris Fashion Week on Friday, with WWD initially reporting it would be Henry’s final collection for the fashion house.

Spanish company Puig, which also has Carolina Herrera, Jean Paul Gaultier and Paco Rabanne on its roster, is scheduled to publish its 2017 annual figures in April, but saw a nine per cent rise in revenues in 2016.

“The way we see it, there’s a portfolio with a significant number of brands already, and within those brands there is the potential to keep growing in different (categories), whether it’s fragrance or fashion,” chief executive officer Marc Puig previously told WWD.

“Our main effort will be to focalize and prioritise the materialisation of the potential for all the brands in the portfolio.”

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