Jonah Hill confirms collaboration with Adidas

Jonah Hill has confirmed he’s collaborating with Adidas.The Wolf of Wall Street actor officially announced on Tuesday via Instagram that he has teamed up with executives at the German sportswear giant for an unspecified project. “This is the official…

Jonah Hill has confirmed he’s collaborating with Adidas.

The Wolf of Wall Street actor officially announced on Tuesday via Instagram that he has teamed up with executives at the German sportswear giant for an unspecified project.

“This is the official announcement that I’m partnering with adidas,” he wrote in the caption besides a video showing the Adidas logo besides his name handwritten in capital letters. “Thank you adidas for trusting me and believing in my ideas and pushing them to become even better. This is a dream for me to start the journey of creating with a team I respect and love. Thrilled to show you all what we’ve been working on. More coming very soon. @adidasoriginals.”

In the comments, his celebrity friends showed their support for the partnership, with Naomi Campbell posting a series of clapping and heart emojis, Olivia Wilde writing, “Coooool” with a clapping emoji, and his mother Sharon Feldstein, who called herself a “proud mama”.

The 36-year-old didn’t reveal any further details about the collaboration, which he had teased a year ago on the Failing Upwards podcast.

However, it was rumoured on social media earlier this month that they were releasing two colourways of the Samba shoe and a new iteration of the Superstar shoe. These details haven’t been confirmed.

Jonah has been a longtime fan of the Adidas brand and helped promote their updated Lxcon sneakers on his Instagram account in October 2018 before their official release.

The star joins the likes of Kanye West and Beyonce, who have developed their Yeezy and Ivy Park collections with the company.

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Olivia Wilde wears low-rise jeans so her ‘gut can expand’

Olivia Wilde prefers to wear low-rise jeans as they allow room for her “gut to expand”.The actress/director has been tapped to front the February 2020 issue of U.S. InStyle magazine, and in an accompanying photoshoot, she models a variety of suits and …

Olivia Wilde prefers to wear low-rise jeans as they allow room for her “gut to expand”.

The actress/director has been tapped to front the February 2020 issue of U.S. InStyle magazine, and in an accompanying photoshoot, she models a variety of suits and dresses inspired by Hollywood’s Golden Age.

However, in an interview held with her Booksmart star Beanie Feldstein for the publication, Olivia insisted that she is at her “most comfortable” in classic denim jeans.

“I’m still pretending to be a teenager from the early 2000s,” she said. “My most comfortable state is when I’m wearing low-rise jeans, sneakers, and a sweatshirt. In that, I am unstoppable. And if I’m in a high-waist jean, I can’t let my gut expand.”

When it comes to dressing for the red carpet, Olivia isn’t afraid to opt for a long sequin gown or chic floral number, and she credits her longtime stylist Karla Welch with helping her put together looks that make her feel confident in the spotlight.

“(Karla) knows I love a strong shoulder and anything that makes me feel powerful. That doesn’t mean I don’t love a flowy frock here and there, but you learn what makes you feel like your best self,” the 35-year-old shared.

In addition, Beanie noted that Olivia looked great in a dramatic white Miu Miu dress and Giuseppe Zanotti heels at the 2019 Gotham Awards in December. But the mother-of-two confessed that she actually had a difficult time manoeuvring her dress during her entrance.

“I was laughing because I’m not good at altering the way I move in the name of fashion. Everyone was like, ‘Olivia, you can’t stomp around like Seabiscuit,'” she laughed.

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Female directors behind record-breaking number of movies in 2019

Filmmakers including Greta Gerwig, Jennifer Lee, and Anna Boden helped propel female-directed movies to record-breaking levels in 2019.Out of the 100 highest-grossing movies of the year, 10.6 per cent of them were directed by female filmmakers, a jump …

Filmmakers including Greta Gerwig, Jennifer Lee, and Anna Boden helped propel female-directed movies to record-breaking levels in 2019.

Out of the 100 highest-grossing movies of the year, 10.6 per cent of them were directed by female filmmakers, a jump from just 4.5 per cent in 2018, according to the University of Southern California (USC) Annenberg Inclusion Initiative, reported Variety.

Movies including Gerwig’s Little Women, Lorene Scafaria’s Hustlers, animated sequel Frozen 2, which was co-directed by Lee and Chris Buck, and Captain Marvel, which was helmed by Boden and Ryan Fleck, all scored box office hits.

Olivia Wilde’s Booksmart, Melina Matsoukas’s Queen & Slim and Lulu Wang’s The Farewell were also among 2019’s most popular female-directed flicks.

“It illuminates where we’re seeing traction and where there’s room for improvement,” said one of the study’s authors, Stacy L. Smith. “Universal under (studio chief) Donna Langley should be lauded for ensuring that women get opportunities.”

Smith also predicted that 2020 will be even better, with female directors being handed the reins of big superhero movies such as Birds of Prey, Eternals, Black Widow, and Wonder Woman 1984 as well as the Disney live-action remake of Mulan.

“2020 will be an extraordinary year for female directors,” she added. “That’s important, because we’re seeing women being given opportunities to direct action movies and not just smaller, independent films… Progress will come when females are given the opportunity to carry movies behind the camera across genres and budget ranges.”

The study comes weeks after the 2020 Golden Globe nominees were announced, sparking outrage that the Best Director category featured all-male candidates once again.

The prize, which will be handed out on Sunday, will be between Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’s Quentin Tarantino, 1917’s Sam Mendes, Joker’s Todd Phillips, Bong Joon-Ho for Parasite, and Martin Scorsese for The Irishman.

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Olivia Wilde stunned by bidding war over upcoming thriller

Olivia Wilde was left stunned when studio executives entered into a bidding war over her next project, Don’t Worry, Darling.The actress/filmmaker made her directorial debut with teen coming-of-age comedy Booksmart earlier this year, with the critically…

Olivia Wilde was left stunned when studio executives entered into a bidding war over her next project, Don’t Worry, Darling.

The actress/filmmaker made her directorial debut with teen coming-of-age comedy Booksmart earlier this year, with the critically acclaimed movie featuring Kaitlyn Dever and Beanie Feldstein and grossing over $24 million (£18 million) at the worldwide box office.

In August, Wilde confirmed she had signed on to direct and produce Don’t Worry, Darling, which will centre on an unhappy 1950s housewife, and was amazed to discover that her upcoming feature was generating a huge deal of interest from studio bosses.

“It was extraordinary and unexpected,” she told Deadline. “The groundswell of support and enthusiasm was extraordinary. I didn’t expect it. I didn’t know what to expect. I just hoped I’d be able to direct again, and this was even before the release.”

The star went on to explain that she had hoped Booksmart would do well enough to allow her to have another shot at directing.

“You know, just finishing the film, I thought, ‘I want to do well enough that I get to do this again’, and then, when I did feel an incredible amount of curiosity about what I wanted to do next, and a lot of offers coming my way, I was encouraged,” the 35-year-old shared.

And Wilde hopes her success is symbolic of a large shift in Hollywood for women.

“There is, of course, a pattern in Hollywood of particularly women not being given an opportunity to make their second feature, if their first doesn’t score at the box office,” she added. “So many female directors had one chance, and they aren’t given another chance as rapidly as the men are.”

Don’t Worry, Darling is currently in development. No casting details have been announced.

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Clint Eastwood suffers his worst opening in 40 years with Richard Jewell

Clint Eastwood has suffered one of the worst box office openings in his career with his new movie Richard Jewell.The drama, which follows the story of the security guard who was wrongly suspected of planting a bomb at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, rake…

Clint Eastwood has suffered one of the worst box office openings in his career with his new movie Richard Jewell.

The drama, which follows the story of the security guard who was wrongly suspected of planting a bomb at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, raked in a disappointing $5 million (£3.7 million) from 2,502 cinemas across the U.S.

The drama marks the second-worst domestic opening for the 89-year-old filmmaker following Billy Bronco, which grossed just $3.7 million (£2.7 million) back in 1980, according to Variety.

Eastwood’s strongest opening weekends came from his other biographical dramas, such as 2014’s American Sniper, which starred Bradley Cooper and raked in $89 million ($66.7 million), followed by Sully, which opened with $35 million (£26.2 million) in 2016.

Richard Jewell, which had a budget of $45 million (£33.7 million), is currently embroiled in controversy after studio executives at Warner Bros. were threatened with a defamation lawsuit by officials at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution over the film’s depiction of its journalists, particularly Kathy Scruggs, who seemingly offers to trade sex with Jon Hamm’s FBI agent for information about the case.

Olivia Wilde, who portrays Scruggs, recently waded into the row by releasing a statement on Twitter in which she told her followers that she had “no say” in how the filmmakers portrayed her character.

“I cannot speak for the creative decisions made by the filmmakers, as I did not have a say in how the film was ultimately crafted, but it’s important to me that I share my personal take on the matter,” she wrote. “Nothing in my research suggested she did so, and it was never my intention to suggest she had.”

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Olivia Wilde clarifies intention behind portrayal of controversial Richard Jewell character

Richard Jewell star Olivia Wilde has insisted it wasn’t her intention to suggest her journalist character traded sex for tips in the movie.Clint Eastwood’s new film tells the story of Richard Jewell, a security guard who discovered a bomb and ushered p…

Richard Jewell star Olivia Wilde has insisted it wasn’t her intention to suggest her journalist character traded sex for tips in the movie.

Clint Eastwood’s new film tells the story of Richard Jewell, a security guard who discovered a bomb and ushered people to safety at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. After initially being hailed as a hero, he became one of the most persecuted people in America after a media report, written by Wilde’s character Kathy Scruggs, suggested he may have planted the explosive in the first place.

One scene, in which Scruggs appears to trade sex with an FBI agent, played by Jon Hamm, in order to get her story, has sparked controversy, with bosses of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where Scruggs worked, threatening studio Warner Bros. with a defamation lawsuit over the depiction of their journalists.

On Thursday night, Wilde took to Twitter to praise Scruggs and clarify her intention behind the character.

“Contrary to a swath of recent headlines, I do not believe that Kathy ‘traded sex for tips’. Nothing in my research suggested she did so, and it was never my intention to suggest she had. That would be an appalling and misogynistic dismissal of the difficult work she did,” she wrote. “The perspective of the fictional dramatisation of the story, as I understood it, was that Kathy, and the FBI agent who leaked false information to her, were in a pre-existing romantic relationship, not a transactional exchange of sex for information.”

Wilde, who made her directorial debut with Booksmart earlier this year, admitted that she could not control “the voice and message of the film” as an actor and that her opinions about Scruggs might differ from the filmmakers.

“I cannot speak for the creative decisions made by the filmmakers, as I did not have a say in how the film was ultimately crafted, but it’s important to me that I share my personal take on the matter,” the 35-year-old added.

Richard Jewell, released on Friday, will feature a disclaimer at the end, which reads: “The film is based on actual historical events. Dialogue and certain events and characters contained in the film were created for the purposes of dramatisation.”

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Jon Hamm defends Richard Jewell movie amid defamation battle

Jon Hamm and Paul Walter Hauser are standing by Clint Eastwood’s drama Richard Jewell amid allegations of defamation.Bosses at Warner Bros., the studio behind the film, have expressed their determination to fight the threat of a possible lawsuit from t…

Jon Hamm and Paul Walter Hauser are standing by Clint Eastwood’s drama Richard Jewell amid allegations of defamation.

Bosses at Warner Bros., the studio behind the film, have expressed their determination to fight the threat of a possible lawsuit from the publishers of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution newspaper over the portrayal of late journalist Kathy Scruggs and her colleagues in the film.

The movie, directed by Eastwood, focuses on the events surrounding the discovery of a bomb at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, and Jewell, the security guard who found it and ushered people to safety, but became a suspect after a media report suggested he planted the bomb.

Journalist Scruggs, played by Olivia Wilde, broke the story, and in the film, it’s alleged she traded sexual favours with an FBI agent, played by Hamm, in order to get her story.

At a screening of the movie on Tuesday, the former Mad Men star defended the depiction of Scruggs and other journalists in the movie.

“It’s my understanding that the people making these accusations haven’t seen the film yet,” Hamm said. “I kind of feel like the irony in that is sort of ridiculous. Kathy is portrayed by Olivia in this film as she was, which is an incredibly nuanced individual. To reduce her to this one thing is not fair.

“I think that there were certainly suggestions of impropriety with her character, but there are also some suggestions of impropriety with the character that I play and that’s part of the tragedy of this story.”

Hauser, who portrays the now-deceased Jewell, has also defended the film, stating, “I think the feeling is that it (lawsuit) sorta came out of nowhere. This project has been around for about five years. It was a very famous screenplay. It had Leo (Leonardo DeCaprio) attached to it at some point. They could have done their digging.”

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Alma Har’el calls Golden Globes voters ‘out of touch’ for snubbing female directors

Honey Boy director Alma Har’el has branded Golden Globes voters “out of touch” for failing to nominate any women in the directing and screenwriting categories.Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) officials came under fire on Monday when the nomin…

Honey Boy director Alma Har’el has branded Golden Globes voters “out of touch” for failing to nominate any women in the directing and screenwriting categories.

Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) officials came under fire on Monday when the nominations for the 2020 Golden Globes were announced, revealing that no women had been recognised in the directing and screenwriting categories.

Har’el, who directed Shia LaBeouf’s recent biographical film, spoke to Variety a short time later and called the voting body “out of touch”.

“It’s obvious they have no awareness at all,” she said. “They’re immersed in this perpetuated activity of basking in male excellence and overseeing this whole new world we’re trying to build with new voices of women and people of colour being part of the conversation… They don’t pay attention to new voices or value them in the same way they value men they are familiar with.

“There were so many films this year that connected with audiences and critics as well as performed at the box office, and this group is out of touch and doesn’t see any of us. Zero women scriptwriters. Zero best films by women. Zero women directors nominated. I will not live my life as a filmmaker who plans to keep working subjected to a group of voters that doesn’t see us.”

Har’el, who called for the creation of a separate female director category, gave a shoutout to her fellow filmmakers, including Greta Gerwig, Olivia Wilde, and Lorene Scafaria, on Twitter after the nominations were announced and told her followers, “These are not our people and they do not represent us. Do not look for justice in the awards system.”

“I take your love over awards any day of the year. I wouldn’t trade the film we made for any other film on any other awards list,” she added.

In its 77-year history, just five female directors have been nominated for Golden Globes, with only Barbra Streisand winning for 1984’s Yentl. In response to the backlash, HFPA president Lorenzo Soria issued a statement insisting, “We don’t vote by gender. We vote by film and accomplishment.”

The 2020 Golden Globes will take place on 5 January.

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Olivia Wilde defends depiction of journalist character in Richard Jewell

Olivia Wilde has defended the depiction of her journalist character in Clint Eastwood’s new movie Richard Jewell following criticism over the suggestion she slept with a source.The movie is based on the events of the 1996 Summer Olympics bombing in Atl…

Olivia Wilde has defended the depiction of her journalist character in Clint Eastwood’s new movie Richard Jewell following criticism over the suggestion she slept with a source.

The movie is based on the events of the 1996 Summer Olympics bombing in Atlanta, and focuses on the true story of security guard Jewell, played by Paul Walter Hauser, who saved thousands of lives during the incident, but is vilified by the press who falsely report that he was a terrorist.

Wilde portrays Kathy Scruggs, who was a reporter for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and in one scene, her character offers to sleep with FBI agent Tom Shaw, played by Jon Hamm, for information about the bombing. Kevin Riley, the current editor-in-chief of the publication, criticised the film for its portrayal of the late journalist, stating that the suggestion she traded sex for information was “offensive and deeply troubling in the #MeToo era.”

Wilde defended the depiction of Scruggs in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter on Monday.

“I have an immense amount of respect for Kathy Scruggs… I feel a certain responsibility to defend her legacy – which has now been, I think unfairly, boiled down to one element of her personality, one inferred moment in the film,” she said.

“I think people have a hard time accepting sexuality in female characters without allowing it to entirely define that character,” the actress continued. “We don’t do that to men, we don’t do that to James Bond – we don’t say James Bond isn’t a real spy because he gets his information sometimes by sleeping with women as sources. This is very specific to female characters, we’ve seen it over and over again, and I think that Kathy Scruggs is an incredibly dynamic, nuanced, dogged, intrepid reporter. By no means was I intending to suggest that as a female reporter, she needed to use her sexuality.”

Richard Jewell is released on 13 December.

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Olivia Wilde applauds airline bosses for restoring Booksmart’s lesbian love scenes

Olivia Wilde is celebrating after Delta airline bosses promised to restore edited same-sex love scenes in her feature directorial debut Booksmart.The actress-turned-filmmaker was shocked to learn a pivotal lesbian sex scene and a mention of the word “v…

Olivia Wilde is celebrating after Delta airline bosses promised to restore edited same-sex love scenes in her feature directorial debut Booksmart.

The actress-turned-filmmaker was shocked to learn a pivotal lesbian sex scene and a mention of the word “vagina” had been cut from the movie for a recent in-flight screening, while the word “f**k” was not removed.

She vented about the censored movie in a series of social media posts and urged airline officials to cut ties with representatives at a third-party company who censor films shown in the air.

Her plea has since been heard by Delta executives, who have promised to make it right – for both Booksmart and Elton John biopic Rocketman, which features gay love scenes.

In a statement issued to The Hollywood Reporter, Delta spokesperson Emma Protis said, “We are immediately putting a new process in place for managing content available through Delta’s in-flight entertainment.

“Studios often provide videos in two forms: a theatrical, original version and an edited version. We selected the edited version and now realise content well within our guidelines was unnecessarily excluded from both films. We are working to make sure this doesn’t happen again.”

Protis also revealed that studio chiefs behind the two projects were providing Delta with their own special cuts of the movies.

Responding to the development, Wilde took to Twitter and wrote, “Thank you, @delta”.

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