Olivier Theyskens named creative director of Azzaro

Olivier Theyskens has been appointed the creative director of French fashion house Azzaro.The Belgian designer launched his namesake brand back in 1998, but shuttered the line after four years to take up stints at Rochas, Nina Ricci, and Theory. Theysk…

Olivier Theyskens has been appointed the creative director of French fashion house Azzaro.

The Belgian designer launched his namesake brand back in 1998, but shuttered the line after four years to take up stints at Rochas, Nina Ricci, and Theory.

Theyskens rebooted his own label in 2016, and after several seasons showing in Paris, he has now been tapped by bosses to reinvigorate the company founded by Loris Azzaro in 1967.

“Loris Azzaro left behind a considerable, very inspiring legacy,” he said in a statement. “I am excited, thrilled and honoured to have the opportunity of bringing my vision to this legendary, iconoclastic House, for which freedom and pleasure remain ever-as-contemporary founding values. I would like to carry on this atypical universe through my collections while infusing them with my own perspective.”

Theyskens, known for his dark yet romantic aesthetic and use of the colour black, will unveil his debut line for Azzaro during Paris Couture Week in July.

In addition to overseeing the brand’s workshop in the French capital, he will continue to work on collections for his own fashion house.

Accordingly, Azzaro’s chief executive officer, Gabriel de Linage, is excited to see what the 43-year-old brings to the label.

“His renowned talent, experience and creative vision will empower the house’s future with spirit and sparkle,” he praised. “Olivier Theyskens has a unique ability to immerse himself in a legacy and to revisit it in a contemporary verve. His fondness for asserted sensuousness and the flowing contrasts of materials and cuts naturally echo the style of Loris Azzaro and his emblematic muses. We are thrilled to welcome him to our house and to our historical workshops.”

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Brock Collection eyes international expansion with new licensing deal

Brock Collection is looking to make a major international expansion.The Los Angeles-based fashion brand was established by Laura Vassar Brock and Kristopher Brock in 2014, with the couple quickly winning acclaim for their sophisticated yet whimsical ae…

Brock Collection is looking to make a major international expansion.

The Los Angeles-based fashion brand was established by Laura Vassar Brock and Kristopher Brock in 2014, with the couple quickly winning acclaim for their sophisticated yet whimsical aesthetic and taking home the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Award in 2016.

Now, Laura and Kris are gearing up to make a splash outside of the U.S. and have signed a licensing deal with Onward Luxury Group (OLG), with the intention of making moves within Europe and the Middle East.

“The timing is really crucial for us,” said Laura of the exclusive agreement, according to Business of Fashion. “We’ve reached a place in our business where we’re ready to grow on a different level.”

OLG is based in Italy and is a subsidiary of Japanese group Onward Holdings. As well as producing an eponymous line, the company has made clothes for many major brands, including Calvin Klein, Sonia Rykiel and Paul Smith, while it also owns Jil Sander and Joseph.

Going forward, the Brock Collection designers want to double sales over the next three years and launch an accessories collection.

According to Kris the OLG partnership with allow him and Laura to focus their attention on developing the creative side of their business.

“Before, as any startup, we had our hands in everything,” he said. “The line plans are growing slightly and we’re going to dive deeper into categories that are high-performance, like dresses, knits and denim.”

Celebrity fans of Brock Collection include Margot Robbie, Alicia Vikander, Elizabeth Olsen and Jessica Alba, with the garments currently stocked in retailers such as Neiman Marcus and Net-a-Porter.

Prior to launching their company, Kris sharpened his skills as a tailor while freelance assisting Calvin Klein, Diane von Furstenberg and Tommy Hilfiger, and Laura worked under designer Olivier Theyskens during his tenure at Theory.

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Guillaume Henry departing Nina Ricci

Guillaume Henry is leaving Nina Ricci after a three-year stint as creative director.Rumours swirled during Paris Fashion Week earlier this month (Mar18) that the French designer was set to depart the luxury house, though brand bosses rebuffed the specu…

Guillaume Henry is leaving Nina Ricci after a three-year stint as creative director.

Rumours swirled during Paris Fashion Week earlier this month (Mar18) that the French designer was set to depart the luxury house, though brand bosses rebuffed the speculation.

However, representatives confirmed on Thursday that Henry is exiting the company.

“After three years of mutually gratifying creative collaboration, Nina Ricci and Guillaume Henry have together decided that the designer will depart the House after the presentation of the fall-winter 2018-19 collection,” they said, referring to the show held on 2 March.

Until Henry’s replacement is employed, upcoming collections will be designed by team members at the label’s in-house studio. In his final range for Ricci, the designer offered up military-inspired coats, capes, camisoles made in metallic fabrics and slinky slip dresses.

Henry studied at the Institut Francais de la Mode before working for the likes of Givenchy, Paule Ka, and Carven, where he acted as creative director from 2009 until 2014. Henry was appointed to the top role at Ricci in January 2015, succeeding Peter Copping, and winning over a number of A-list fans including Gigi Hadid, Beyonce Knowles and Queen Letizia of Spain.

Other designers to previously helm the Paris-based label include Lars Nilsson and Olivier Theyskens.

The fashion house was founded by Maria ‘Nina’ Ricci in 1932, and has been owned by Spanish fashion conglomerate Puig, which also operates the Carolina Herrera and Paco Rabanne brands.

Editors at WWD have reported that Henry’s exit was a consequence of his frustration over investment in Ricci by Puig executives. However, chief executive officer Marc Puig previously told the fashion publication that they were focusing on “organic” growth.

“The way we see it, there’s a portfolio with a significant number of brands already, and within those brands there is the potential to keep growing in different (categories), whether it’s fragrance or fashion,” he shared.

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