Tessa Thompson tried on 50 costumes for Men in Black: International

Tessa Thompson went through 50 options before selecting her Men in Black: International costume.The 35-year-old actress worked closely with veteran costume designer Penny Rose to select the perfect look for her character M, who wears a stylish yet prac…

Tessa Thompson went through 50 options before selecting her Men in Black: International costume.

The 35-year-old actress worked closely with veteran costume designer Penny Rose to select the perfect look for her character M, who wears a stylish yet practical look modelled after the signature black suits that appear in the franchise.

For the reboot of the hit films, Rose opted to reimagine the items with the help of British designer Paul Smith, and they put together 50 jacket and pants options for Thompson to try out, with the star ultimately settling on pieces she could easily move in.

“Together, we decided that the two-button, double-breasted, longer jacket – with the big kick-pleat at the back – would be far more impressive for all the action work,” she told Fashionista.com. “It moves very well.”

When it came to footwear, Rose decided the 10-inch height difference between Thompson and her co-star Chris Hemsworth, who portrays Agent H, called for heels and selected comfortable yet empowering lace-up work boots by Naked Wolfe that she described as “fairly elegant”.

Rose also experimented when it came to Emma Thompson’s costume as Agent O, pairing a blazer designed by Smith with a custom-made pencil skirt featuring peplum detailing.

“It made her feel a little saucy and a little bit cheeky,” Rose added. “We wanted to give it a twist and make it a bit seductive, if you like.”

Men in Black: International, also starring Liam Neeson and Rebecca Ferguson, is now showing in cinemas.

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Paul Smith flew to be with Japanese staff after 2011 tsunami

Paul Smith jumped on a flight and flew to Japan after the 2011 tsunami and earthquake hit to be with his staff.The quintessential English designer has a massive presence in the Asian country, something he attributes to his “real affection for the cultu…

Paul Smith jumped on a flight and flew to Japan after the 2011 tsunami and earthquake hit to be with his staff.

The quintessential English designer has a massive presence in the Asian country, something he attributes to his “real affection for the culture”.

And when Japan was struck by the devastating natural disaster in March 2011, which claimed the lives of over 15,000 people, Paul didn’t hesitate in getting himself over there.

“It was around the time that some of my staff and I usually fly out there. Our trip was cancelled, but I still wanted to go by myself,” he told Mr Porter. “The plane was empty – just me and a handful of people going home to their families. I had to go, to be there with my staff, to say, ‘I’m with you. I understand.’ It made such a difference to them, and to me.”

Estimating that he has visited Japan at least 100 times, Paul has drawn on the nation for a spring collection for Mr Porter.

Made up of a series of printed short-sleeved shirts and shorts covered in flowers and cranes, the designer drew on styles he saw in old Japanese textile books.

“Even now, I still get excited when I go (to Japan),” the 72-year-old smiled.

And when asked why he’s enjoyed so much success in the nation compared to other designers, he ventured: “I came with a different attitude. I think a lot of the others fell by the wayside because they weren’t curious about the culture here; they didn’t try and immerse themselves in the way of life.”

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Paul Smith outfitted entire cast of Men in Black: International movie

Paul Smith suited and booted the entire Men in Black: International cast for the franchise’s new film.The alien-fighting agency features for a fourth time in F. Gary Gray’s upcoming movie, which hits cinemas this summer, with Chris Hemsworth and Tessa …

Paul Smith suited and booted the entire Men in Black: International cast for the franchise’s new film.

The alien-fighting agency features for a fourth time in F. Gary Gray’s upcoming movie, which hits cinemas this summer, with Chris Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson leading the cast, taking over from Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones, who last appeared 2012’s Men in Black 3.

Costume designer Penny Rose turned to her frequent collaborator Smith to outfit the cast, with the project marking a first for the designer.

“We’ve never provided clothes for an entire film,” Smith smiled to WWD. “(Penny’s) been coming to us for many years, mostly in the London shop. She’ll usually use six suits here, or two things there. But not 140!”

“He has a very original style that transcends all ages,” said Rose, adding that for the latest film she wanted “to raise the sartorial bar” for the stars and background players alike.

Rebecca Ferguson, Liam Neeson and Emma Thompson also feature.

And although the suits needed are all black, the British designer, known for his love of colour, has added touches of his signature style in the form of monster-patterned silk linings and multi-stripe socks peeking out from Hemsworth’s pant legs.

As well as the cast’s costumes, Smith is also rolling out a retail collection inspired by the film, which hits stores on 22 May.

The line, priced between $55 (£43) to $1,560 (£1,229), includes suits, dress shirts, sunglasses, pug-shaped button studs, monster-printed hoodies, leather accessories, socks and ties.

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Donatella Versace: ‘Trust your instincts when embarking on a career in fashion’

Donatella Versace has warned emerging designers they will encounter both good and bad advisors when trying to make it in the industry.As part of an advice piece for hot new fashion talent, a long list of established names have shared their seasoned wis…

Donatella Versace has warned emerging designers they will encounter both good and bad advisors when trying to make it in the industry.

As part of an advice piece for hot new fashion talent, a long list of established names have shared their seasoned wisdom to help budding stars as they begin their journey.

For Versace head Donatella, who took over the label when her brother, brand founder Gianni Versace, was killed in 1997, she shared that you shouldn’t shut out people close to you who are not in fashion.

“People will talk, judge your ideas and your decisions,” she told i-D magazine. “You will have good and bad advisors. Trust in your instincts, listen to what the people you trust have to tell you and then make up your mind. Sometimes it is useful to share ideas and thoughts with people you trust who are not from the industry; it is incredible what fresh outlooks you can get from somebody that is not involved with the fashion business!”

As for English designer Paul Smith, he said knowing all aspects of the industry is a big bonus when it comes to longevity.

“Know your stuff!” he enthused. “Jobs in the fashion industry are many and varied so think carefully about which particular part of the industry you’re interested in and get completely immersed in it. Learn everything you can about the different opportunities available and get practical experience. Throughout my career I’ve done everything from shifts in the warehouse to working in the shops, all those experiences are so important.”

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Daniel Day-Lewis worked with Paul Smith for Phantom Thread

Daniel Day-Lewis took a job with British designer Paul Smith’s fashion house to help him prepare for his role in Phantom Thread. The Lincoln star, who played dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock in the 2017 film, is known for his method acting and Smith revea…

Daniel Day-Lewis took a job with British designer Paul Smith’s fashion house to help him prepare for his role in Phantom Thread.

The Lincoln star, who played dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock in the 2017 film, is known for his method acting and Smith reveals he came to him to learn all about the skills and terminology behind fashion design.

”I’m a mate of Daniel Day-Lewis and he dresses really well,” Smith tells Table Manners with Jessie Ware. “He worked with our tailor for a week and then he went off to work in a couturier in New York I think as well.”

”He was only with us for five days I think, just to learn the terms… they’re not scissors they’re sheers you know…” he adds.

The Oscar winner announced Phantom Thread, which garnered critical acclaim, would be his last film.

”Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor,” a statement from the actor’s representative read. “He is immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences over the many years. This is a private decision and neither he nor his representatives will make any further comment on this subject.”

The 61 year old subsequently explained he was not as confident in the value of his most recent movies.

”It’s settled on me, and it’s just there…,” he said. “I dread to use the overused word ‘artist’, but there’s something of the responsibility of the artist that hung over me. I need to believe in the value of what I’m doing. The work can seem vital. Irresistible, even. And if an audience believes it, that should be good enough for me. But, lately, it isn’t.”

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Paul Smith: ‘Why do budding designers think fashion equals crazy?’

Paul Smith wonders why fashion students often favour “crazy” designs over the practical.The British designer launched his eponymous label in 1970 and today has expanded into over 70 countries around the world. He was even awarded a knighthood by Queen …

Paul Smith wonders why fashion students often favour “crazy” designs over the practical.

The British designer launched his eponymous label in 1970 and today has expanded into over 70 countries around the world. He was even awarded a knighthood by Queen Elizabeth II for his services to fashion in 2000.

Smith has become renowned for his modern tailoring, and though he believes he isn’t a “revolutionary” designer, he sees value in everyday, practical clothing that other fashionistas have overlooked.

“(I meet fashion students who) want to do extreme clothing because they have to justify this idea that design equals crazy things, when actually it’s about pleasant, easygoing things,” he explained in an interview with The Times.

Smith first garnered a reputation for his quality men’s clothing, but started to design for women in 1993 and recently released a new 15-piece Tuxedo collection for ladies.

Celebrities including Charlize Theron, Katie Holmes and Karlie Kloss have previously been snapped wearing his pieces, though the 72-year-old is adamant that his success is not a result of his ability as a designer.

“I think I have done OK because I am not a great designer and I am not a great businessman, but I can do both,” he mused. “Whereas some people have amazing creativity, but are hopeless with common sense.”

Aside from his new women’s suits, Smith recently entered into a three-year licensing agreement with British luxury eyewear brand Cutler and Gross, after their one-off collaboration in May (18) proved a success. He told WWD that the aim was to grow and strengthen the label’s position in the luxury eyewear market with a particular focus on optical frames, though sunglasses will be featured.

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Burberry burns excess stock worth millions each year – report

Burberry reportedly burned over $36 million (£28 million) worth of stock in the past year.Reporters at The Times have investigated what big name brands do with old stock, and in shocking findings, discovered that Burberry, which is helmed by new chief…

Burberry reportedly burned over $36 million (£28 million) worth of stock in the past year.

Reporters at The Times have investigated what big name brands do with old stock, and in shocking findings, discovered that Burberry, which is helmed by new chief creative officer Riccardo Tisci, gets rid of large amounts of stock every year, with a staggering $117 million (£90 million) destroyed in the past five years.

Burberry executives admitted to the publication that they burn unwanted stock. However, they claimed to work with “specialist incinerators” that are able to harness the energy from the process.

Stars like Cara Delevingne, Kate Moss, Eddie Redmayne, Emma Watson, James Bay and Romeo Beckham have starred in the English heritage brand’s past campaigns, but it seems the clothes they model are not intended for everyone, with the publication reporting that Burberry, famous for its chequered print and trench coat, and other high end-labels dispose of clothes in a bid to stop them being worn by the “wrong people” after finding their way onto “grey markets” at discounted prices.

In the report, it was noted that Burberry shareholders are not happy with the destruction process, and at the brand’s recent annual meeting, questioned why the clothes and cosmetics were not offered to the company’s private investors.

Since October (17), the label has been donating leather waste to London-based reclaimed brand Elvis & Kresse so they can be turned into new accessories.

Swedish retailer H&M, sports giant Nike and Swiss watchmaker Richemont also destroy old stock, either because garments are in poor condition or to stop them being sold for discount prices.

Speaking to The Times, a representative from Temperley London explained that unwanted stock is donated to charity Women for Women or sent to its discount outlet in Oxford, England. Other labels, including Vivienne Westwood, Paul Smith and Victoria Beckham, chose not to comment.

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Brock Collection eyes international expansion with new licensing deal

Brock Collection is looking to make a major international expansion.The Los Angeles-based fashion brand was established by Laura Vassar Brock and Kristopher Brock in 2014, with the couple quickly winning acclaim for their sophisticated yet whimsical ae…

Brock Collection is looking to make a major international expansion.

The Los Angeles-based fashion brand was established by Laura Vassar Brock and Kristopher Brock in 2014, with the couple quickly winning acclaim for their sophisticated yet whimsical aesthetic and taking home the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Award in 2016.

Now, Laura and Kris are gearing up to make a splash outside of the U.S. and have signed a licensing deal with Onward Luxury Group (OLG), with the intention of making moves within Europe and the Middle East.

“The timing is really crucial for us,” said Laura of the exclusive agreement, according to Business of Fashion. “We’ve reached a place in our business where we’re ready to grow on a different level.”

OLG is based in Italy and is a subsidiary of Japanese group Onward Holdings. As well as producing an eponymous line, the company has made clothes for many major brands, including Calvin Klein, Sonia Rykiel and Paul Smith, while it also owns Jil Sander and Joseph.

Going forward, the Brock Collection designers want to double sales over the next three years and launch an accessories collection.

According to Kris the OLG partnership with allow him and Laura to focus their attention on developing the creative side of their business.

“Before, as any startup, we had our hands in everything,” he said. “The line plans are growing slightly and we’re going to dive deeper into categories that are high-performance, like dresses, knits and denim.”

Celebrity fans of Brock Collection include Margot Robbie, Alicia Vikander, Elizabeth Olsen and Jessica Alba, with the garments currently stocked in retailers such as Neiman Marcus and Net-a-Porter.

Prior to launching their company, Kris sharpened his skills as a tailor while freelance assisting Calvin Klein, Diane von Furstenberg and Tommy Hilfiger, and Laura worked under designer Olivier Theyskens during his tenure at Theory.

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Paul Smith collaborates on eyewear collection in honour of friend Tony Gross

Paul Smith is teaming up with eyewear company Cutler and Gross to pay tribute to friend and co-founder, Tony Gross.The eyewear pioneer passed away in March (18) at the age of 78, and Smith believed that a collaboration with the brand Gross found with p…

Paul Smith is teaming up with eyewear company Cutler and Gross to pay tribute to friend and co-founder, Tony Gross.

The eyewear pioneer passed away in March (18) at the age of 78, and Smith believed that a collaboration with the brand Gross found with partner Graham Cutler was the perfect way to honour his late comrade’s success in the industry.

“I’ve always had enormous admiration for Cutler and Gross. Before we sadly lost him this year, Tony Gross was a personal friend of mine,” Smith shared in an interview with WWD.

This is not the 71-year-old’s first eyewear collaboration, having previously worked with the likes of American brands Oliver Peoples and Oakley.

Smith’s collection with Cutler and Gross, which is considered one of the few pioneering eyewear labels to make eyewear a fashion accessory, will debut during the British brand’s spring/ summer 2019 show during Paris Fashion Week starting in September.

All limited edition designs are unisex and available in eight colours, including black, purple, tortoiseshell, blue and burgundy. Each pair of sunglasses will retail at $400 (£300) and be available for purchase immediately after the catwalk show has drawn to a close.

The frames – a sleek, square style – were produced by hand at Cutler and Gross’ factory in Domegge di Cadore, Italy, and are intended to merge the aesthetics of both brands as one.

“They have been designed to symbolise the meeting of both brands’ DNA, based on the same love of handcrafted, thoughtful design,” smiled Marie Wilkinson, creative director of Cutler and Gross.

The unisex designs echo Smith’s decision to showcase both men’s and womenswear on the same catwalk, and last year decided to ditch his womenswear slot at London’s Fashion Week in favour of a co-ed Paris catwalk. The runway initiate has also been adopted by brands such as Burberry, Tom Ford and Kenzo.

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