Edward Norton didn’t want to ruin friendship with Thom Yorke over Motherless Brooklyn score

Edward Norton dropped plans to get Thom Yorke to score his new movie Motherless Brooklyn as he feared it would wreck their friendship.The Fight Club actor originally wanted the Radiohead frontman to pen around 75 minutes of jazz music for the period dr…

Edward Norton dropped plans to get Thom Yorke to score his new movie Motherless Brooklyn as he feared it would wreck their friendship.

The Fight Club actor originally wanted the Radiohead frontman to pen around 75 minutes of jazz music for the period drama, which he directs and stars in, but instead turned to Wynton Marsalis, a legend of the genre, to write most of the film’s music, with Yorke contributing one track, Daily Battles.

Speaking to The Guardian, the actor revealed that they decided not to work together as the musician felt a little upset with the use of his score in Luca Guadagnino’s 2018 horror Suspiria and he didn’t want a similar situation to ruin their friendship.

“Not to say that we don’t love Luca,” Norton said. “But Thom came off Suspiria feeling so burned.”

Explaining their decision to limit their collaboration to one song, he added: “The last thing you want with somebody you know is to get into a bloody situation. That’s the nightmare of all nightmares.”

Before turning to Marsalis, Norton considered Yorke’s Radiohead bandmate Jonny Greenwood but he learned from the guitarist and composer’s longtime collaborator Paul Thomas Anderson that Greenwood’s working style would not have gelled well with his.

“(Anderson) said: ‘If you expect any iterative back-and-forth flow with Jonny, this is a mirage. He just sends me what he’s got and says: ‘Good luck to you’…And, well, no. That wouldn’t work for me,” the 50-year-old recalled.

Norton and Yorke nearly worked together on the same movie two decades ago – as the No Surprises hitmaker was offered the chance to score Fight Club. However, he turned the opportunity, with the musician explaining, “Got the email. Got the script. And I was just too f**ked up in the head to do it.”

Motherless Brooklyn debuted in cinemas earlier this month.

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Martin Scorsese defends criticism of Marvel movies

Martin Scorsese has elaborated on his criticism of the Marvel movies in an opinion piece for The New York Times.The Irishman director, 76, sparked a huge backlash by calling the movies “not cinema” in an interview with Britain’s Empire magazine.Scorses…

Martin Scorsese has elaborated on his criticism of the Marvel movies in an opinion piece for The New York Times.

The Irishman director, 76, sparked a huge backlash by calling the movies “not cinema” in an interview with Britain’s Empire magazine.

Scorsese addressed the controversy in an article published in The New York Times on Monday, claiming he did not want to attack the artistry of those involved, but stating that they are not to his taste and are crowding other types of films out of cinemas.

“Many franchise films are made by people of considerable talent and artistry,” the movie legend wrote in his op-ed. “You can see it on the screen. The fact that the films themselves don’t interest me is a matter of personal taste and temperament.

“I know that if I were younger, if I’d come of age at a later time, I might have been excited by these pictures and maybe even wanted to make one myself. But I grew up when I did and I developed a sense of movies – of what they were and what they could be – that was as far from the Marvel universe as we on Earth are from Alpha Centauri.”

The director went on to describe his love of Alfred Hitchcock’s films and compared their spectacular set-pieces to current comic book blockbusters.

However, he also stated that modern blockbuster franchises are “market-researched, audience-tested, vetted, modified, revetted and remodified until they’re ready for consumption” – unlike those of auteur directors like Spike Lee, Kathryn Bigelow, or Paul Thomas Anderson.

Defending his decision to criticise Marvel, the famed director explained that even iconic auteurs like himself were struggling to get their films into cinemas – as he’d had to turn to Netflix to make his new gangster epic The Irishman.

“We have a theatrical window, which is great,” he complains. “Would I like the picture to play on more big screens for longer periods of time? Of course I would. But no matter whom you make your movie with, the fact is that the screens in most multiplexes are crowded with franchise pictures.”

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