Chanel to stop using fur and exotic skins in collections

Chanel will no longer use fur and exotics skins in fashion collections.In recent months, major brands including Coach, Versace, Michael Kors, Gucci, and Burberry, have ditched fur from their lines, with a number of other companies, such as Nike, ASOS, …

Chanel will no longer use fur and exotics skins in fashion collections.

In recent months, major brands including Coach, Versace, Michael Kors, Gucci, and Burberry, have ditched fur from their lines, with a number of other companies, such as Nike, ASOS, Topshop, H&M, and Puma all committing to banning exotic skins.

Now, executives at Chanel have joined the initiative, pledging to discard of fur or exotic animal skins in any future ranges.

“We are continually reviewing our supply chains to ensure they meet our expectations of integrity and traceability,” a representative said in a statement. “In this context, it is our experience that it is becoming increasingly difficult to source exotic skins which match our ethical standards.”

At present, exotic skins used in Chanel products include lizard, snake, stingray, and crocodile. A number of purses featuring exotics skins are still available to buy on the Paris-based label’s website, including a python and gold metal mini flap bag, costing $5,830 (£4,580), and a small BOY Chanel handbag with lizard and calfskin which is priced at $7,945 (£6,240).

Bruno Pavlovsky, president of Chanel fashion, said the decision to ditch animal-derived fabrics was in part due to the difficulty in finding products which were ethically and sustainably sourced. In addition, he explained that very little fur had ever been used in either Chanel founder Coco Chanel’s lines or current creative director Karl Lagerfeld’s work.

“You look at old collections, there was not much fur,” he told WWD.

Regarding Chanel’s initiative, a spokesperson for animal advocacy group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) praised the luxury label.

“Recent advancements in textiles have made faux fur and vegan leather nearly indistinguishable from animal pelts and skins, far more sustainable, and infinitely customisable, meaning there’s simply no reason to breed and kill animals for fashion,” they said.

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Jean Paul Gaultier to stop using fur

Jean Paul Gaultier is ditching the use of “deplorable” fur products.The designer made the announcement on French television over the weekend (10-11Nov18), labelling the ways animals are killed for their fur “absolutely deplorable”.”I’m going to…

Jean Paul Gaultier is ditching the use of “deplorable” fur products.

The designer made the announcement on French television over the weekend (10-11Nov18), labelling the ways animals are killed for their fur “absolutely deplorable”.

“I’m going to fix that, I’ve used it since I started, using old furs, recycling, sometimes. The fur is often more sensual than faux fur, it’s unfortunate to say,” Gaultier reportedly acknowledged on channel Canal +. “But we can find other ways to warm up, so maybe that will allow us to go to a creative part that will not hurt.”

Gaultier is the latest fashion designer to pledge to go fur-free, following in the footsteps of brands Coach, Gucci and Versace among many others.

Bosses at animal rights charity People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) have been celebrating the good news.

“The corks are popping at PETA’s headquarters after Jean Paul Gaultier announced live on French television last night that he won’t be using fur in future collections, admitting that the ways animals are killed for their fur are ‘absolutely deplorable’,” Sascha Camilli, European Projects Manager for PETA told website Livekindly.

“This decision is a sign of changed times, as most people no longer wish to wear anything from animals who were cruelly caged, electrocuted, bludgeoned to death or caught in steel traps, left to die slowly and painfully–the way coyotes are still being killed for the trim on Canada Goose jackets. Fur today is as dead as the poor animals it was stolen from, and any designers not clued up enough to see that may as well hang up their sewing needles now.”

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Diane von Furstenberg to cease use of fur and angora

Diane von Furstenberg will no longer use fur or angora in fashion collections.In recent months, executives at luxury houses including Versace, Michael Kors, Burberry and Gucci have all pledged to ditch fur and other animal products. Now, fashion desig…

Diane von Furstenberg will no longer use fur or angora in fashion collections.

In recent months, executives at luxury houses including Versace, Michael Kors, Burberry and Gucci have all pledged to ditch fur and other animal products.

Now, fashion designer Diane von Furstenberg has committed to ceasing production and use of fur, as well as exotic skins, mohair, and angora – the downy coat produced by the Angora rabbit – in all upcoming ranges.

“I am so excited that technology has provided us a way to feel as glamorous with faux fur,” she said in a statement, while DVF chief executive officer Sandra Campos added: “It’s time for us to make this change and accept responsibility to ensure that we don’t promote killing animals for the sake of fashion. We are committed to supporting the shift to a more ethical and sustainable fashion industry by providing the consumer with innovative and sophisticated alternatives.”

Concerned with the ethical and environmental impact of using farmed fur in fashion collections, and answering the consumer’s desire for ethical fashion, bosses at the company have partnered with officials at the Humane Society of the United States and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) to end the exploitation of animal fur in fashion.

In addition, executives are working on a sustainability roadmap with partners at the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) and will also be focusing on developing innovative textiles as fur substitutes.

Accordingly, animal rights advocates at PETA have praised Furstenberg’s decision.

“PETA is toasting DVF’s compassionate, business-savvy decision to scrap fur and angora,” a representative said. “The company has joined a long list of fashion brands that recognise that fur is dead. We’re calling on any out-of-touch retailer still selling coats, collars, and cuffs made from tormented animals to get with the times and do the same.”

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Pamela Anderson begs Prada to stop using fur

Pamela Anderson has called on Prada designer Miuccia Prada to stop using fur in the brand’s products.The 51-year-old, who describes herself as a “naughty vegan” because she eats croissants in her adopted home country of France, has been a dedicated ani…

Pamela Anderson has called on Prada designer Miuccia Prada to stop using fur in the brand’s products.

The 51-year-old, who describes herself as a “naughty vegan” because she eats croissants in her adopted home country of France, has been a dedicated animal rights activist since childhood.

She often works with officials at nonprofit group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) to fight for the cause, and has once again teamed up with them in a bid to stop Prada’s fur output.

“I have long admired your creativity – and Prada’s timeless nylon bag – but I was disappointed to learn from my friends at PETA that instead of going fur-free, Prada has chosen merely to reduce the amount of animal pelts that it sells,” Pamela wrote. “A ‘ gradual’ reduction is no consolation to animals who are languishing inside tiny cages on fur farms and being anally electrocuted and skinned alive for their fur right now. Please, I urge you to drop fur immediately.

“‘Humane fur’ is like ‘merciful murder’: It doesn’t exist. Even in countries that participate in the fur industry’s Origin Assured programme – which claims that animals are treated ‘humanely’ before they’re slaughtered – investigations by PETA and other animal-protection groups have repeatedly shown that cruelty is rampant.”

Prada has recently reaffirmed to PETA its commitment “to a gradual and concrete reduction in the marketing of these products which, to date, represent less than 0.1 per cent of the entire production.”

However, Pamela wants them to put an end to the practice entirely.

Other brands which have gone fur-free recently include Burberry, Gucci, Versace, Michael Kors and Ralph Lauren.

It was also announced earlier this week that the Los Angeles City Council has agreed to ban the sale of fur in the American city.

Pamela also suggested that Prada officials meet with Dan Mathews, senior vice president of PETA.

“(He) can help guide you and your team – in italiano fluente – toward a fur-free future. At the very least, please reveal the names of your fur suppliers so that the public can see what practices Prada is supporting by continuing to sell fur,” she noted.

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London Fashion Week goes fur-free

London is to become the first Fashion Week to ditch fur.Following news that Burberry, under new chief creative officer Riccardo Tisci, has joined the many labels vowing to ditch garments made from the animal product, it seems bosses at the British Fash…

London is to become the first Fashion Week to ditch fur.

Following news that Burberry, under new chief creative officer Riccardo Tisci, has joined the many labels vowing to ditch garments made from the animal product, it seems bosses at the British Fashion Council (BFC) have taken on board the altered attitude to fur.

Council chief executive Caroline Rush said, after announcing that the BFC is going 100 per cent fur-free, the move “highlights a trend we have seen over the past few years, with more and more brands deciding to use alternative materials to fur”.

The BFC’s commitment to go fur-free comes after English singer Paloma Faith, on behalf of the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), urged bosses at the bi-annual fashion event to ban animal fur.

“The BFC shouldn’t be endorsing a material whose production is deemed so cruel that it is outlawed in the U.K.,” she stated. “With the vast number of cutting-edge, eco-friendly faux furs available on the market today, I’m sure you’ll agree that there’s no longer any excuse for killing animals for their fur.”

After hearing the news her plea had worked, an excited Paloma tweeted: “I am so overwhelmed and elated that fur has been banned from london fashion week (sic)! Progress!”

In a poll, PETA found that 95 per cent of designers with a show or presentation at London Fashion Week in February (18) didn’t use fur in their autumn/winter 2018 collections, including Burberry and Mulberry.

Fashion Week shows kick off in the British capital on 14 September, following on from presentations in New York.

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Paloma Faith begs London Fashion Week to ditch fur

Paloma Faith has called on London Fashion Week to go fur-free.The prestigious fashion event kicks off in the U.K. capital from 14 September (18), and will showcase the latest collections from labels including Victoria Beckham, Simone Rocha and Burberry…

Paloma Faith has called on London Fashion Week to go fur-free.

The prestigious fashion event kicks off in the U.K. capital from 14 September (18), and will showcase the latest collections from labels including Victoria Beckham, Simone Rocha and Burberry.

However, Paloma has called upon the British Fashion Council (BFC) to implement meaningful change and forbid animal fur being used as part of any of the week’s events.

Teaming up with officials at People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the singer has sent a letter to the BFC pointing out that there is no longer a market for fur in Britain.

“The BFC shouldn’t be endorsing a material whose production is deemed so cruel that it is outlawed in the U.K.,” she wrote. “With the vast number of cutting-edge, eco-friendly faux furs available on the market today, I’m sure you’ll agree that there’s no longer any excuse for killing animals for their fur.”

This is not the first time Paloma has teamed up with animal rights organisation, having been tapped by PETA in 2014 to narrate a video exposing routine cruelty in the international fur trade.

Elsewhere in the letter, the Lullaby hitmaker also praised the efforts of British brands such as Stella McCartney and Vivienne Westwood, whose designs are 100 per cent fur-free.

“I’m proud to be from a country that leads the way with the world’s most exciting and compassionate designers and brands. Please respond to the progress we’re seeing for animals by introducing a no-fur policy at the BFC,” she implored the council.

A recent PETA poll found that 95 per cent of designers with a show or presentation at London Fashion Week in February didn’t use fur in their autumn/winter 2018 collections, including Burberry and Mulberry.

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Ralph Lauren to stop using mohair in all garments

Ralph Lauren will no longer use mohair in any products.Following pressure from officials at animal rights organisation People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), representatives from the Ralph Lauren Corporation, founded by designer Ralph Laur…

Ralph Lauren will no longer use mohair in any products.

Following pressure from officials at animal rights organisation People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), representatives from the Ralph Lauren Corporation, founded by designer Ralph Lauren in 1967, have confirmed that they are ditching mohair, a silk-like fabric or yarn made from the hair of the Angora goat.

The ban will apply to all of the New York-based retail giant’s brands, including Ralph Lauren Home, Polo Ralph Lauren, Chaps, Club Monaco and American Living.

“Because a credible animal welfare standard for sourcing mohair does not currently exist, we will not include it in our product pipeline going forward,” a Ralph Lauren spokesperson said, according to The New York Post.

The decision comes after PETA campaigners conducted an expose of the mohair industry in South Africa, where more than 50 per cent of the world’s mohair is sourced. Video footage depicted shearers working quickly and carelessly, leaving angora goats with gaping wounds.

In addition, unwanted goats were slaughtered in agonising ways – with PETA’s legal team asking law enforcement agencies in the nation to investigate and file charges, as appropriate, for potential violations of the Animals Protection Act.

“PETA’s expose pulled back the curtain on the violent mohair industry, and Ralph Lauren responded by banning the cruelly produced material,” added Anne Brainard, PETA director of corporate affairs, in a statement. “Ralph Lauren has joined the growing list of fashion brands that recognise that today’s shoppers don’t support cruelty to animals in the fashion industry.”

Other fashion brands that have banned mohair include Zara, Gap, Banana Republic, H&M, Topshop, Uniqlo, Diane von Furstenberg and Brooks Brothers, among others.

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Gucci will no longer use angora in its designs

Gucci has announced that it will no longer use angora in its designs.The brand recently joined the likes of fashion houses such as Calvin Klein and Ralph Lauren by pledging to go fur-free, having confirmed the decision last October (17). And on Tuesday…

Gucci has announced that it will no longer use angora in its designs.

The brand recently joined the likes of fashion houses such as Calvin Klein and Ralph Lauren by pledging to go fur-free, having confirmed the decision last October (17).

And on Tuesday (26Jun18), animal rights organisation PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) claimed that the Italian luxury label has also ditched angora – the downy coat produced by the Angora rabbit.

The ethical policy was finalised late last year, according to WWD, though Gucci executives have declined to comment on the news.

According to the charity, the fashion house is one of 330 companies that have opted to go angora-free, and the group are hoping that the influence of creative director Alessandro Michele means the move will encourage others to follow suit, while a PETA spokeswoman claimed that the group is urging Kering – which also owns brands including Saint Laurent and Balenciaga – to ban angora across all its labels.

Gucci, which is well known for its fur lined loafers, announced the fur-free initiative during the 2017 Kering Talk at The London College of Fashion, with CEO Marco Bizzarri pledging a more moral approach to the business.

“Being socially responsible is one of Gucci’s core values, and we will continue to strive to do better for the environment and animals,” he stated. “With the help of HSUS and LAV (animal charities), Gucci is excited to take this next step and hopes it will help inspire innovation and raise awareness, changing the luxury fashion industry for the better.”

Other brands to ditch fur include Armani, Hugo Boss and staunch animal rights campaigner Stella McCartney.

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John Galliano no longer using fur

Designer John Galliano is vowing not to use fur in his clothing lines moving forward. The fashion powerhouse, who is the creative director of Paris-based label Maison Margiela, made the decision after a chance vacation meeting with People for the Et…

Designer John Galliano is vowing not to use fur in his clothing lines moving forward.

The fashion powerhouse, who is the creative director of Paris-based label Maison Margiela, made the decision after a chance vacation meeting with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) senior vice president Dan Mathews.

“I was swimming in the sea with Penelope Cruz in Saint-Tropez,” he told Elle. “And just then, Dan’s face popped out of the water. It was like in (movie) Jaws – very frightening!”

His ocean chat with Mathews and general fashion trends combined to make Galliano realise the use of fur has lost its appeal and is no longer necessary to make a bold style statement.

“You can be outrageous and fun without fur! Come and party with us, you’ll see!

“Fur used to be associated with luxury… What is true luxury today?” he said. “It’s authenticity. And inventiveness… Today we don’t want a product, we want ethics, a firm that defends the values that we admire.”

Matthews also spoke to the publication about Galliano’s choice, explaining the gruesome method in which animals are skinned to make certain items.

“It takes 100 chinchillas to make a coat,” he revealed. “They are killed in China, where the regulations are very weak. It’s a bloodbath. They are electrocuted, their living conditions are abominable.”

The Gibraltar-born designer’s encounter with Matthews has also led him to make a major lifestyle change.

“My life is more balanced,” Galliano said. “I really became a vegetarian in order to get in better shape. I play sports, I take care of myself and I’ve never been more clear-eyed. The energy that I get from having fewer toxins in my body is extraordinary.

“The pressure in the fashion industry is the same, but now I know how to step away and meditate, and my life has gone from black to white!”

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Anjelica Huston donates fur coats to PETA

Anjelica Huston has given her old fur coats “new purpose” by donating them to charity.The Royal Tenenbaums star and longtime animal activist handed over a lynx-fur jacket, a muskrat-trimmed fur coat, a black rabbit hide hat and other items to officials…

Anjelica Huston has given her old fur coats “new purpose” by donating them to charity.

The Royal Tenenbaums star and longtime animal activist handed over a lynx-fur jacket, a muskrat-trimmed fur coat, a black rabbit hide hat and other items to officials at People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) on Tuesday (30Jan18).

The garments and accessories will be transformed into bedding for animals and people who are struggling to keep warm in the winter.

“These coats were given to me decades ago, when I had no idea how animals suffered in the fur trade,” the actress writes in a statement to WENN. “They’ve been sitting in storage for over 20 years. By donating them to PETA, I’ll be giving them a new purpose by providing orphaned wildlife with bedding and helping the homeless keep warm.”

Anjelica’s old coats are going to be sent off to a variety of locations, from Beverly Hills to West Virginia, where homeless residents at the Scott Place Shelter will use the apparel to stay warm.

The Cuddle Coats organisation in Minnesota also benefits from the 66-year-old star’s donation – bosses at the charity plan to cut up the garments to make them into animal beds.

Huston, who was dubbed PETA’s Person of the Year in 2012, is the latest in a long line of celebrities who have gifted their furs to the animal rights group – Mariah Carey, Mary Tyler Moore, Sharon Osbourne and Kim Cattrall have also done so in the past.

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