Tyler, the Creator unveils tennis-inspired collection for Lacoste

Tyler, the Creator has created a tennis-inspired collection for French fashion label Lacoste.The rapper, real name Tyler Okonma, is not only making his mark in the hip-hop world but also the style scene, having started clothing company Golf Wang back i…

Tyler, the Creator has created a tennis-inspired collection for French fashion label Lacoste.

The rapper, real name Tyler Okonma, is not only making his mark in the hip-hop world but also the style scene, having started clothing company Golf Wang back in 2011.

Now, Tyler has teamed up with executives at Lacoste, founded by tennis player Rene Lacoste and Andre Gillier in 1933, and come up with the Lacoste × Golf Le Fleur line, which fuses his personal style with classic tennis culture.

“Outsider. Polymath. Iconoclast. Bad boy. Just to name a few of Tyler, The Creator’s many qualities,” a brand spokesperson said of the 28-year-old. “The California-based musician, revered for his production and directing skills, is also notorious for his off-centre creative statements, that fittingly describe the unique outfits he puts together.”

The 16-piece line features colour blocking and retro references, with key items including thick cotton polo shirts, buttoned T-shirts, sweatshirts, shorts, bucket hats, a tracksuit, as well as a classic varsity jacket.

Influenced by an ’80s-style colour palette, each of the fabrics has a fun name.

“The colours themselves were renamed to express singularities produced by surprising multi-shades or complementary side tints. Don’t say dusty pink, say ‘litchi’. Beige becomes a mineral ‘geode’. Forget about off-white; here we are talking ‘mascarpone,'” they added.

Even Lacoste’s iconic crocodile logo has been reworked and features an embroidered poppy flower in its jaw.

The Lacoste × Golf Le Fleur collection will drop in stores on 17 July in the brand’s physical and online stores and in concept boutiques around the world.

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Lacoste unveils Keith Haring-inspired capsule collection

Lacoste has launched a capsule collection inspired by the work of late artist Keith Haring.The New York-based painter and muralist, known for his pop art and graffiti-like motifs as well as for addressing political and societal themes, died at the age …

Lacoste has launched a capsule collection inspired by the work of late artist Keith Haring.

The New York-based painter and muralist, known for his pop art and graffiti-like motifs as well as for addressing political and societal themes, died at the age of 31 in 1990 from AIDS-related complications.

Designers at Lacoste are now honouring the street art star with the Keith Haring x Lacoste line, available in select stores and online from 27 March (19).

“A street art genius of the 1980s, Keith Haring is known for the simplicity of his line, his bright colours outlined in black and his animated figures who express his energy, zest for life and spontaneity: common values shared with the French company, which pays homage to the unique world and vision of this pioneer who had already understood the importance of combining art and fashion,” a brand rep said in a statement.

The collection features Haring’s famous figures on polo shirts, T-shirts, sweatshirts, dresses, and swimsuits, with the design also appearing on the lining of a bomber jacket, a sneaker or a reversible tote bag. In addition, the artist’s Barking Dog and Heart drawings are displayed on a T-shirt or discretely applied on the collar of a polo shirt or the back of a tennis shoe.

“When some people follow the codes, others break them and play with them, like (tennis player and brand co-founder) Rene Lacoste when he cut the sleeves of his shirt to create the polo shirt. The streets of New York’s East Village remember the man who used their walls the way others use a canvas. Lacoste pays tribute to Keith Haring the artist and unveils an artistic and socially conscious collection,” they added.

A number of other brands have harnessed Haring’s designs in recent collections, including fashion labels Alice + Olivia and Tommy Hilfiger, as well as footwear company Toms.

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New Lacoste boss Louise Trotter finds harmony in mixing fashion and sportswear

New Lacoste boss Louise Trotter doesn’t consider fashion and sportswear to be separate entities, and has found “harmony” in bringing them together.Former Joseph designer Louise was appointed as creative director of the French fashion brand back in Octo…

New Lacoste boss Louise Trotter doesn’t consider fashion and sportswear to be separate entities, and has found “harmony” in bringing them together.

Former Joseph designer Louise was appointed as creative director of the French fashion brand back in October (18). She’s been working hard on her first collection for Lacoste since then and will present it at the Tennis Club de Paris on Tuesday (05Mar19).

Ahead of the show, Louise spoke to WWD about her ambitions when moving over to Lacoste, and whether or not she’s achieved any of them so far.

“Lacoste has always been a fashion brand with a sportswear heritage,” she mused. “It’s always been where we’ve played. In fact, what’s unique about Lacoste is that it’s always been in this space where people can’t necessarily say it’s just that. Most heritage brands live off their heritage, looking at their craft, retro thinking.

“Lacoste is heritage but it’s always been forward thinking, looking at how to innovate. It’s also a French brand, and French culture is all about opposites. I find harmony in mixing the fashion element and the sportswear. Our lives today are constantly about movement and motion, so for, me I don’t see them as separate entities.”

Upon joining Lacoste, Louise looked back through the brand’s archives and found herself drawn into the story of Rene Lacoste and how he started the label. So when it came to creating her own range, Louise wanted to ensure that it still had the same, strong “brand values” as previous offerings.

“In life, it’s not about the end result, it’s about the journey,” the designer said. “The journey is as important to me as the finish line. When I think about the values of winning sport in the correct way, through tenacity, hard work, commitment, fair play, joy, and taking those into life, that was the first hook for me. I believe that’s the right way to live your life, and with regards to the political climate right now, those values for me are even more important.”

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