Rob Reiner pays tribute to ‘guiding light’ Carl Reiner

Rob Reiner has paid tribute to his father Carl Reiner following his death on Monday.The Hollywood icon passed away from natural causes at the age of 98 on Monday, and his actor/director son Rob was among the first to share his heartache at the news. “…

Rob Reiner has paid tribute to his father Carl Reiner following his death on Monday.

The Hollywood icon passed away from natural causes at the age of 98 on Monday, and his actor/director son Rob was among the first to share his heartache at the news.

“Last night my dad passed away,” he shared in a post on Twitter on Tuesday. “As I write this my heart is hurting. He was my guiding light.”

Famous friends of The Dick Van Dyke Show creator paid their respects on social media, including Mel Brooks, his close friend and frequent collaborator.

“Carl was a giant, unmatched in his contributions to entertainment,” he shared on Twitter. “Whether he wrote or performed or he was just your best friend – nobody could do it better. He’ll be greatly missed. A tired cliche in times like this, but in Carl Reiner’s case it’s absolutely true. He will be greatly missed.”

Bette Midler, who starred in Carl’s 1997 film That Old Feeling, wrote: “The great #CarlReiner has gone to that Show of Shows in the sky. I worked with him, loved him, and consider myself one of the luckiest people in the world to have once attended lunch with his hilarious, guarrulous (sic) gang…” while Dick Van Dyke, who worked with the actor on the U.S. sitcom from 1961 to 1966, posted: “100% pure mensch (person of integrity and honour). We love you so much.”

Carl’s longtime friend Alan Alda shared a photo of the pair with Brooks, and wrote: “His talent will live on for a long time, but the loss of his kindness and decency leaves a hole in our hearts. We love you, Carl.”

George Clooney also fondly remembered Carl, who portrayed conman Saul Bloom in the Ocean’s Eleven film trilogy: “Carl Reiner made every room he walked into funnier, smarter, kinder.

“It all seemed so effortless. What an incredible gift he gave us all. His was a life well lived and we’re all the better for it. Rest in peace my friend.”

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Kathy Bates ‘hit the big time’ working with Clint Eastwood

Kathy Bates finally felt like she had “hit the big time” when she worked with Clint Eastwood on Richard Jewell.The 71-year-old actress, who began her career in Hollywood back in 1970, told Deadline that despite a long and successful career, she only fe…

Kathy Bates finally felt like she had “hit the big time” when she worked with Clint Eastwood on Richard Jewell.

The 71-year-old actress, who began her career in Hollywood back in 1970, told Deadline that despite a long and successful career, she only felt like she’d “hit the big time” when she got the chance to work with the Oscar-winning director.

“I said to Clint, ‘I’ve been doing this for 50 years, but I finally feel like I hit the big time,’” she recalled. “And I don’t mean with all the marching bands and the confetti, I mean, working with another incredible director, and doing a story that matters.”

Bates, who won an Oscar in 1990 for her terrifying portrayal of obsessed fan Annie Wilkes in Misery, confessed that despite working with filmmakers such as Rob Reiner, James Cameron and Sam Mendes, she was starstruck and “extremely nervous” when meeting Eastwood.

Recalling her first-ever encounter with the 89-year-old, Bates said she asked him why he wanted to make a movie about Richard Jewell, the security guard who was wrongly accused of planting a bomb at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia.

“At first he looked up with those eyes and I thought, ‘Oh God, here we go.’ Then he said, ‘Well, I think it’s a movie I’d like to see.’ He was so angry at how Richard had been treated. He felt this was an American tragedy, and that it needed to be told,” she explained.

Bates, who plays Jewell’s mother Bobi in the movie, insisted that her portrayal was not an impersonation, but was inspired by her real-life character.

“We sat and talked for two or three hours and I recorded her voice,” she shared. “I had to, as an actor, create a character of Bobi, otherwise it would have been robotic. You can’t just go in and try to mimic somebody.”

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Jerry O’Connell’s dad convinced him Stand By Me would never be a hit

Jerry O’Connell feared his breakout movie Stand by Me would be a huge flop when he watched it in an empty cinema with his grandparents.The actor had the time of his life on the set of director Rob Reiner’s 1986 film when he was 11, but his dad felt sur…

Jerry O’Connell feared his breakout movie Stand by Me would be a huge flop when he watched it in an empty cinema with his grandparents.

The actor had the time of his life on the set of director Rob Reiner’s 1986 film when he was 11, but his dad felt sure the project would never see the light of day and urged young Jerry not to tell school pals about it when he returned to New York from the summer shoot in Oregon.

And his father appeared to be right when Stand by Me eventually hit theatres the following summer.

“I was going into seventh grade in the New York City public school system and my dad said, ‘Don’t go around telling people you’re in a movie because when it doesn’t come out…,'” O’Connell recalled during a recent 92nd Street Y event in the Big Apple. “I literally forgot about it.

“They released it the following summer to seven theatres in the country… and I went with my grandparents to the noon matinee and it was empty, which wasn’t a very good sign.”

But things started looking up for the young star as he was leaving.

“The lady who sold us our tickets said, ‘Hey, hold on a second. Were you in that movie? Movie stars don’t have to pay,’ and she gave us our money back,” the 45-year-old remembered. “She stopped me before I left and said, ‘Hey, I see a lot of movies and that’s gonna be a big movie.'”

O’Connell still has great memories of the summer he spent with Reiner and castmates River Phoenix and Corey Feldman too, adding, “I had been called hyperactive and heard Ritalin thrown around at parent/teacher conferences: ‘He’s disruptive and speaks without raising his hand.’ I couldn’t control it and all of that behaviour was encouraged by Rob Reiner. It was the most freeing place at the age of 11. I felt like me.”

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Carol Kane: ‘There’s no need to remake The Princess Bride’

Veteran funnywoman Carol Kane will never be part of a The Princess Bride remake, because she doesn’t think there’s any need to reboot perfection. With so many Hollywood studios greenlighting revamps of classic films like A Star is Born, Aladdin, Dumbo…

Veteran funnywoman Carol Kane will never be part of a The Princess Bride remake, because she doesn’t think there’s any need to reboot perfection.

With so many Hollywood studios greenlighting revamps of classic films like A Star is Born, Aladdin, Dumbo and The Lion King, fans of Rob Reiner’s classic fairytale are hoping for the news of a return of characters like Westley, Inigo Montoya, Prince Humperdinck, Fezzik, Miracle Max and Kane’s character Valerie, but she’s hoping Tinseltown leaves the 1987 film well alone.

“I don’t think a movie remake (would work) because I think it’s perfect (as it is),” Kane told Page Six at The Paley Media Center on Thursday (24Jan19). “I would gather that Rob Reiner would say the same and everybody in it would say the same.”

The film also starred Cary Elwes, Mandy Patinkin, Wallace Shawn, Andre the Giant, Christopher Guest, Robin Wright, and Billy Crystal.

“I think that I cannot imagine them doing a remake although now they’re doing remakes of just about everything,” Carol added. “But why remake something that’s perfect the first time around? That’s what I think.”

Reiner gathered his cast together for a 25th anniversary celebration in 2012 – Kane joined the director and many of the film’s stars for the premiere of a restored print of the movie at Alice Tully Hall in New York City.

The screening was held as part of the 2012 New York Film Festival in conjunction with the release of a Blu-ray edition of the cult classic.

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