Mass exodus of Roberto Cavalli employees at Florence HQ

More than 100 Roberto Cavalli employees at the fashion house’s headquarters in Florence, Italy have quit ahead of a planned move to Milan.More than 50 staff will relocate, but over half of the 170 workers have decided to walk away from their jobs, with…

More than 100 Roberto Cavalli employees at the fashion house’s headquarters in Florence, Italy have quit ahead of a planned move to Milan.

More than 50 staff will relocate, but over half of the 170 workers have decided to walk away from their jobs, with unions Femca Cisl and Filctem Cgil Firenze releasing a statement explaining why.

“The Florentine headquarters of the company will disappear, we are losing a huge professional and human patrimony, in addition to a resource for the territory,” a union representative said. “We remain worried about the industrial future of the brand – there are numerous suppliers in Tuscany – and the workers also appear to be concerned, since more than 100 have decided to quit rather than move to the Milan headquarters. The workers have fought as much as they could to convince the company to renounce closing the plant in Sesto Fiorentino, and we thank the local institutions that have been close to us.”

WWD reports that staff have agreed to a preliminary adhesion to a social plan. It will see them resign and be compensated with eight to 11 months of wages, depending on the length of their employment.

The move is expected to begin in September.

In April 2019, bosses closed all stores across North America as they embarked on a major restructure.

Italian designer Roberto Cavalli founded his eponymous label in 1970, and became known for his use of bold and bright animal prints.

Since 2015, Cavalli has owned only a small share of the company, with Dubai-based property developer Hussain Sajwani finalising a sale of the troubled brand in November, from Italian private equity fund Clessidra SGR.

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Jessica Simpson slams former Vogue editor for ‘body shaming’ her in Met Gala article

Jessica Simpson has slammed “nauseating” comments made about her figure by a former Vogue editor in an article about the Met Gala.To commemorate the prestigious annual event, which was due to be held on Monday but has been indefinitely postponed in lig…

Jessica Simpson has slammed “nauseating” comments made about her figure by a former Vogue editor in an article about the Met Gala.

To commemorate the prestigious annual event, which was due to be held on Monday but has been indefinitely postponed in light of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, the fashion bible published a comprehensive “oral history” of the Met Gala, which featured input from celebrities, designers, and models.

In the lengthy article, former Vogue creative digital director Sally Singer recalled an interaction between Jessica and her then-boyfriend John Mayer at the Poiret: King of Fashion-themed ball back in 2007.

She suggested the singer’s breasts “maybe fell out” of her plunging, beaded Roberto Cavalli gown while she was on the red carpet, and said that the wardrobe malfunction allegedly got worse once Jessica was seated for dinner.

“At dinner it was suddenly like, whoa, Jessica Simpson’s breasts are across from me at the dinner table and they are on a platter and I’m looking at them,” Sally wrote. “And John Mayer was putting his hands on them at the dinner table. He kind of reached down and I just remember thinking, ‘Oh, celebrities, feel free to play here. That’s what’s going on.'”

However, the 39-year-old hit back at the “inaccurate” article in a post on Instagram on Tuesday and vented her frustration by uploading a copy of the iconic picture of Sophia Loren glaring at Jayne Mansfield’s bosom at a Hollywood party in 1957.

“Feeling a little like Jayne Mansfield after reading this (inaccurate!) oral history of the #MetBall where I am body shamed by #SallySinger,” Jessica wrote, noting that she has battled body issues her whole life. “To read this much-anticipated article about the classiest fashion event there is and have to be shamed by another woman for having boobs in 2020 is nauseating.”

However, editors at Vogue quickly issued an apology to the star, insisting the article was never intended to cause her to feel personally attacked.

“We are sorry that Jessica felt body-shamed by the anecdote in our Met piece,” they commented. “That was never our intent, but we understand her reaction and we apologise for including it.”

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Roberto Cavalli sale finalised

Troubled fashion house Roberto Cavalli has officially been purchased by a Dubai-based property developer.Bosses at the Italian fashion label, known for its exotic prints and sand-blasted jeans, announced in late March that they were closing all stores …

Troubled fashion house Roberto Cavalli has officially been purchased by a Dubai-based property developer.

Bosses at the Italian fashion label, known for its exotic prints and sand-blasted jeans, announced in late March that they were closing all stores across North America and were seeking to make a deal with creditors to keep the company going while they searched for an investor.

After months of speculation over who may take over the company, it was reported in July that executives at Vision Investments, part of the DICO Group, were in negotiations to acquire the Florence-headquartered brand, and on Thursday, the transaction was completed. Financial details of the deal weren’t shared.

“We are excited about carrying forward the incredible legacy of the Roberto Cavalli brand. DICO has a long and fruitful association with Roberto Cavalli, and I believe that the brand resonates with our idea of luxury. I am happy to announce that the transaction was executed swiftly and that we will ensure stability in management,” said Hussain Sajwani, chairman of DAMAC Properties, in a statement. “At DICO Investments, we aspire to own internationally recognised brands, and this acquisition marks a significant step in our strategy.”

Sajwani, an Emirati billionaire property developer, founded real estate development company DAMAC Properties in 2002. Based in Dubai, the company provides residential, commercial and leisure properties and has presences across the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan, Lebanon, Oman, and the U.K.

Since 2015, managers at the Italian private equity fund Clessidra SGR controlled Roberto Cavalli with a 90 per cent stake, along with other minor partners, including the designer himself.

Former Versace executive Gian Giacomo Ferraris was brought onboard in July 2016 to help turn around the company, and following the departure of creative director Peter Dundas, British designer Paul Surridge was employed as head designer in May 2017. However, Surridge confirmed plans to exit his post in March, and a successor has not yet been named.

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Balmain’s Olivier Rousteing discovers birth mother in new documentary

Olivier Rousteing has reached out to his birth mother as part of a new documentary.The French designer began his career at Roberto Cavalli, before replacing Christophe Decarnin as creative director at Balmain in 2011 when he was just 25. Since then, Ro…

Olivier Rousteing has reached out to his birth mother as part of a new documentary.

The French designer began his career at Roberto Cavalli, before replacing Christophe Decarnin as creative director at Balmain in 2011 when he was just 25.

Since then, Rousteing’s career has gone from strength to strength, but he has continued to have questions about his birth parents, and as part of Anissa Bonnefont’s new film Wonder Boy, the fashion star located his adoption file and discovered his mother’s identity.

“There’s all this talk about inclusivity and diversity, and I’m the first to fight for it, but how could I fight for it without knowing myself where I was from?” he said in an interview with The New York Times. “I thought I had to face not only my own roots, but my question about why my mother didn’t want me.”

Rousteing was adopted at 12 months old and had a happy childhood in Bordeaux. He and his family had always assumed he was biracial and his parents “were very in love” but couldn’t stay together because of their age. Yet, the designer was stunned to find out that this wasn’t the case.

“She was Somalian and he was Ethiopian, which means I am African-African… I’m black,” the 34-year-old revealed, adding that his mother was very young when he was born and still lives in France.

Rousteing did not share further details about his biological parents, though he did write a letter for social workers to give to his mother. He is unsure what he will do if she responds.

The designer will unveil his spring/summer 2020 collection for Balmain on Friday. Wonder Boy is to be broadcast in France on 16 October and hit cinemas the following month.

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Roberto Cavalli acquired by Dubai-based property developer

Troubled fashion house Roberto Cavalli has been acquired by a Dubai-based property developer.Bosses at the Italian brand, known for its exotic prints and sand-blasted jeans, announced in late March that they were closing all stores across North America…

Troubled fashion house Roberto Cavalli has been acquired by a Dubai-based property developer.

Bosses at the Italian brand, known for its exotic prints and sand-blasted jeans, announced in late March that they were closing all stores across North America and were seeking to make a deal with creditors to keep the company going while they searched for an investor.

After months of speculation over who may take over the label, editors at WWD reported on Tuesday that executives at Vision Investment Co. LLC had signed a “binding agreement” with those at the Florence-based Roberto Cavalli to “acquire 100 per cent” of the company.

Vision Investment Co. is overseen by Hussain Sajwani, an Emirati billionaire property developer, who is the founder and chairman of real estate development company DAMAC Properties. Based in Dubai, the company provides residential, commercial and leisure properties and has presences across the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan, Lebanon, Oman, and the U.K.

As the deal is a complex one, with some aspects to be approved by a court in Milan, the fashion publication reported that lawyers for Cavalli need to make an agreement with creditors by early August, with the arrangement to be finalised the following month.

No financial details about the deal have been announced.

Since 2015, Italian private equity fund Clessidra SGR has controlled Roberto Cavalli with a 90 per cent stake, along with other minor partners, including the Florentine designer himself.

Former Versace executive Gian Giacomo Ferraris was brought onboard in July 2016 to help turn around the company, and following the departure of creative director Peter Dundas, British designer Paul Surridge was employed as head designer in May 2017. However, Surridge confirmed plans to exit his post in March, and a successor has not yet been named.

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Peter Dundas: ‘My brand is a happy one’

Peter Dundas’ sole aim for his namesake label is to be known as a happy brand.Norwegian designer Dundas launched his eponymous fashion house two years ago with a bang – creating Beyonce’s custom looks at the 2017 Grammy Awards.Explaining his design phi…

Peter Dundas’ sole aim for his namesake label is to be known as a happy brand.

Norwegian designer Dundas launched his eponymous fashion house two years ago with a bang – creating Beyonce’s custom looks at the 2017 Grammy Awards.

Explaining his design philosophy, the former Roberto Cavalli head told WWD that he’s all about fun.

“There are different ways of communicating with the media nowadays. It’s not checking in with fashion weeks for years and years anymore,” he mused.

“There are designers who express intellect, art and sometimes sadness through fashion, but I want the Dundas brand to be a happy brand. And I want my woman to feel that way with her life, too.”

Evangelo Bousis, his business and life partner, echoed Dundas’ sentiments, and added that the brand is multifaceted.

“Dundas is not just a red carpet brand. There are so many layers to Dundas. We do lots of leather, and we do daywear, too. In our mind, we are a lifestyle brand and a Dundas woman has many faces,” he stated.

Earlier this month, Dundas, who also served as the artistic director of Emilio Pucci, unveiled the new D6 collection, which was inspired by the animals and nature of Africa.

Explaining why he took his cue from wild animals, especially big cats, he shared: “When I was launching the brand, I didn’t know what to put, so I put elements of a black panther into it. Now, every collection has a bit of black panther in it.”

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Stella Maxwell’s dishes top detox advice

Stella Maxwell’s top tips for detoxing is to drink lots of water and eat a fresh and clean diet.The model has to look perfect for her job, where she poses for the likes of Victoria’s Secret, Max Factor and Roberto Cavalli, but away from work, Stell…

Stella Maxwell’s top tips for detoxing is to drink lots of water and eat a fresh and clean diet.

The model has to look perfect for her job, where she poses for the likes of Victoria’s Secret, Max Factor and Roberto Cavalli, but away from work, Stella likes to let her hair down from time to time.

To combat any effects of partying, Stella has a foolproof way to getting back to looking her best, which she shared in a chat with W magazine.

“Drink plenty of water, eat fresh and clean. And remember to get rest when you can. It’s tempting to stay out late, but they call it beauty rest for a reason!” she smiled to the publication.

The catwalk beauty, who has previously dated Kristen Stewart and was rumoured to have hooked up with Miley Cyrus, also dished on her best travel hacks, which she has learned through years of travelling the globe for modelling gigs.

“Allow for sleep on your flights. Make sure you pay attention to what type of water your putting on your skin when you travel, as water changes from city to city. Travel with your own soaps,” she listed.

And the 28-year-old, who admits she’s obsessed with Miranda Kerr’s KORA Organics line, opened up about her bedtime beauty regime, which is as simple as always washing her face before going to sleep.

“And if you put something toxic into your body, it’s going to reflect on your body,” she added.

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Roberto Cavalli closes all stores in North America

Roberto Cavalli bosses have closed all stores across North America as they embark on a major restructure.The Italian fashion house, known for its exotic prints and sand-blasted jeans, has faced financial struggles in recent months, with executives conf…

Roberto Cavalli bosses have closed all stores across North America as they embark on a major restructure.

The Italian fashion house, known for its exotic prints and sand-blasted jeans, has faced financial struggles in recent months, with executives confirming on Friday (29Mar19) that they were seeking to make a deal with creditors to keep the company going while they searched for an investor, though by Monday all eight stores and four outlets in the U.S., including boutiques in upscale locations in Beverly Hills and Manhattan, had been shuttered.

And on Monday, a Cavalli spokesperson announced that Art Fashion Corporation – the name of the brand’s U.S. subsidiary – would liquidate under Chapter 7 of the bankruptcy code by 4 April as part of a concerted attempt to save the business.

Approximately 93 employees have had their contracts terminated, while New York-based Salvatore Tramuto, the chief executive officer of the North American branch, has resigned.

According to editors at Business of Fashion, Art Fashion Corporation has operated at a loss for the past five years, with the company losing approximately $17.8 million (£13.6 million) in 2018, excluding a $13 million (£10 million) marketing budget.

Since 2015, Italian private equity fund Clessidra SGR has controlled Roberto Cavalli with a 90 per cent stake, along with other minor partners, including the Florentine designer himself.

Former Versace executive Gian Giacomo Ferraris was brought onboard in July 2016 to help turn around the company, and following the departure of creative director Peter Dundas, British designer Paul Surridge was employed as head designer in May 2017. However, Surridge confirmed plans to exit his post last week.

“I have given much consideration to this decision and reached the conclusion that the mission I have signed has changed and enters a new direction with a new perspective (sic),” he wrote on his Instagram page. “I now wish to focus on other projects that I put aside in order to achieve our common goals with Roberto Cavalli Group. It has been an honour to work for this iconic Florentine company with a unique heritage.”

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Paul Surridge confirms exit from Roberto Cavalli

Paul Surridge is leaving Roberto Cavalli after almost two years at the brand.The British designer joined the Italian label in May 2017, succeeding Peter Dundas as creative director. However, rumours began to swirl last week (ends24Mar19) that Surridge …

Paul Surridge is leaving Roberto Cavalli after almost two years at the brand.

The British designer joined the Italian label in May 2017, succeeding Peter Dundas as creative director.

However, rumours began to swirl last week (ends24Mar19) that Surridge was looking to exit his post, and on Monday (25Mar19), he took to Instagram to confirm his plans.

“I have given much consideration to this decision and reached the conclusion that the mission I have signed has changed and enters a new direction with a new perspective (sic),” he wrote. “I now wish to focus on other projects that I put aside in order to achieve our common goals with Roberto Cavalli Group. It has been an honour to work for this iconic Florentine company with a unique heritage. I want to thank everyone who has made this journey possible, the internal teams and especially Gian Giacomo Ferraris who has given me outstanding support and will remain a mentor.”

Representatives for Roberto Cavalli Group and chief executive officer Gian Giacomo Ferraris have yet to comment on Surridge’s departure.

In the days leading up to the designer’s exit, editors at WWD reported that his decision was due to a lack of investment in the development and refurbishment of the store network, as well as in marketing and communications. He was also alleged to have been unhappy about the level of support offered to the design team.

“The decision last summer to look for an external investor and, more recently, to not provide any more funding have made the original project impossible, and therefore triggered Paul’s decision to look elsewhere,” one source divulged to the fashion publication.

Prior to joining Cavalli, Surridge predominantly worked in the menswear departments for labels including Prada, Burberry, Calvin Klein, and Jil Sander. In June 2018, the designer unveiled a full menswear line for Roberto Cavalli, and most recently showed a collection as part of Milan Fashion Week in February.

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Paul Surridge rumoured to be leaving Roberto Cavalli

Paul Surridge is reportedly close to resigning from Roberto Cavalli.The English designer joined the label in 2017, succeeding Peter Dundas as creative director.However, sources have told WWD that Surridge is no longer happy in the role and is on the ve…

Paul Surridge is reportedly close to resigning from Roberto Cavalli.

The English designer joined the label in 2017, succeeding Peter Dundas as creative director.

However, sources have told WWD that Surridge is no longer happy in the role and is on the verge of walking away from Roberto Cavalli.

An insider claimed his decision comes down to a lack of investment in the development and refurbishment of the store network as well as in marketing and communications. He is also said to feel the design team has not been supported, as resources have been scarce.

“The decision last summer to look for an external investor and, more recently, to not provide any more funding have made the original project impossible, and therefore triggered Paul’s decision to look elsewhere,” one source divulged.

So far, there has been no official comment on the reports. Surridge enjoyed a career in menswear design before joining Roberto Cavalli, previously holding posts at Prada, Burberry, Calvin Klein, and Jil Sander.

Despite his history in men’s fashion, Roberto Cavalli chief executive officer Gian Giacomo Ferraris was confident Surridge was the perfect fit for the Italian label and commented at the time of his appointment: “I have worked with Paul, and I had the opportunity to appreciate his creative talent as well as his managerial abilities. Paul has a 360-degree vision on brands and branding. He is passionate, mature, and an amazing team player.”

In June 2018, Surridge unveiled a full menswear line for the label. He most recently showed as part of Milan Fashion Week in February.

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