Rosamund Pike explains the importance of Armani clothes

Rosamund Pike favours Armani clothes because they allow her “true form” to be revealed.The English actress has her pick of designers when it comes to dressing for glitzy showbiz events, but you’ll often find her wearing pieces from Giorgio Armani’s nam…

Rosamund Pike favours Armani clothes because they allow her “true form” to be revealed.

The English actress has her pick of designers when it comes to dressing for glitzy showbiz events, but you’ll often find her wearing pieces from Giorgio Armani’s namesake label.

She sat front row at the designer’s Milan Fashion Week show on Saturday (23Feb19), and opened up about why she’s such a big fan of the Italian label.

“At Armani, there’s a way the clothes follow the body that means your true form is revealed,” she enthused to The Guardian. “I felt that the first time I ever put on a pair of Armani trousers when I did my Bond film. I thought: ‘this works for my body'”.

The Gone Girl actress was in a tailored black suit for the Fall/ Winter 19 presentation, and was joined by Naomi Watts and Austin Mahone at the show.

She also spoke about the importance of clothes as a whole.

“Clothes have their own energy. They should never feel like costume. You should be able to buy into the energy of a good suit or a wonderful dress. Wearing them should feel effortless,” she smiled.

Elsewhere on Saturday, Glenn Close was feted at Armani’s Beverly Hills boutique ahead of Sunday night’s Oscars.

Samuel L. Jackson, Jeff Goldblum and Sara Sampaio were among the stars who turned out for the stylish event, which was held after Close scooped the Best Female Lead at the Film Independent Spirit Awards.

“Mr. Armani was the first designer to work with me,” she said to the Los Angeles Times.

Close, who lost out to Olivia Colman for the Best Actress Oscar, added to WWD: “The first important blazer I bought was a black, double-breasted Armani, it was in the Eighties when they had those amazing shoulders. And then the first fancy dress I borrowed was from Armani, for the first Kennedy Center honours I went to (in 1984). I still have the blazer. I probably have all my Armani suits because all through the ’90s, that’s all that I wore.”

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Hubert de Givenchy was ‘thrilled’ by Clare Waight Keller’s couture plans

Hubert de Givenchy was “thrilled” when Clare Waight Keller told him about her plans to bring couture back to Givenchy.The British designer previously acted as artistic director of Chloe, but jumped ship to the French luxury house in early 2017, where s…

Hubert de Givenchy was “thrilled” when Clare Waight Keller told him about her plans to bring couture back to Givenchy.

The British designer previously acted as artistic director of Chloe, but jumped ship to the French luxury house in early 2017, where she succeeded Riccardo Tisci.

Shortly after Waight Keller landed the role at Givenchy, she went and met the company’s original couturier, who founded the label in 1952, at his home, and was pleased to find that he was on board with her vision.

“He’d heard that I was bringing back couture, and he was really thrilled,” she recalled to Vogue magazine of speaking to Givenchy, who died at the age of 91 in March 2018. “He said, ‘That is the heart of my house. That’s where I was the most happy, working with the clients. That was the dream part of the work for me.'”

Waight Keller went on to explain that bringing back haute couture was a huge commitment, and “an expensive” project to undertake. However, it appears to have paid off, as celebrities including Charlize Theron and Rosamund Pike have worn Givenchy numbers to red carpet events, while Meghan, Duchess of Sussex chose a bespoke gown for her wedding to Prince Harry last May.

“She’s a strong woman – she knows what she wants,” the 48-year-old shared of her royal client. “It was really an absolute joy working with her.”

Elsewhere in the chat, Waight Keller spoke about the pressure to put together 10 collections a year for the house, and how she has hired new craftspeople to assist in the atelier.

And she divulged that her colleagues were surprised to find that she works in direct contrast to former designer Tisci, who now helms U.K. heritage house Burberry.

“Riccardo worked completely differently to me extremely last-minute,” she noted. “So he needed enormous teams of temporary people just to make sure it happened. I prefer working in a little bit more of a managed way with smaller teams of more senior people.”

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Rosamund Pike: ‘Starring in A Private War sometimes felt too big a responsibility’

Rosamund Pike sometimes worried she was taking on a job “too big” when she was preparing to play late journalist Marie Colvin in A Private War.In the drama, the Gone Girl actress plays American journalist Colvin, who worked as a foreign affairs corresp…

Rosamund Pike sometimes worried she was taking on a job “too big” when she was preparing to play late journalist Marie Colvin in A Private War.

In the drama, the Gone Girl actress plays American journalist Colvin, who worked as a foreign affairs correspondent for The Sunday Times from 1985 until her death in 2012, while she was covering the siege in Syria.

Rosamund had to change a lot about herself to transform into Colvin, and she admitted to Marie Claire magazine that she was daunted by the enormous responsibility of the role as she was preparing for the shoot.

“At the end of film, Marie says, ‘Fear comes later when it’s all over.’ And now I’ve done it, sometimes I think, ‘How did I have the audacity?'” Rosamund said. “There were definitely times I felt at a loss in the preparation; that it was too big, that there was too much to change. The voice, the smoking, the head gestures, her laugh, her walk, her brain… everything, really.”

The British actress had plenty of insight from people who knew Colvin well, such as photographer Paul Conroy, who joined her in warzones, to journalist Rosie Boycott and politician Jane Bonham-Carter.

Rosamund explained that her and director Matthew Heineman gradually won people over by proving that they were staying true to Colvin’s story.

“There’s a horrible fear that you’ve dared to tread in their dear friend’s shoes, and that can make you feel quite apologetic at times, although in this case, I’m not apologetic because we’ve made the film with the fiercest integrity,” she continued. “Gradually, people trusted that Matt and I were committed to depicting their friend truthfully and not for any Hollywood-isation.”

The actress has been nominated for a Golden Globe for her work in A Private War, but will face stiff competition from Lady Gaga, Melissa McCarthy, Glenn Close and Nicole Kidman for the best dramatic actress in a film prize.

A Private War, which also stars Jamie Dornan as Conroy, hits U.K. cinemas from 1 February (19).

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Givenchy’s Clare Waight Keller reflects on momentous year

Givenchy’s Clare Waight Keller has reflected on her momentous year in fashion.The British designer previously acted as artistic director of Chloe, but jumped ship to Givenchy in early 2017, where she succeeded Riccardo Tisci. Regarding her first full…

Givenchy’s Clare Waight Keller has reflected on her momentous year in fashion.

The British designer previously acted as artistic director of Chloe, but jumped ship to Givenchy in early 2017, where she succeeded Riccardo Tisci.

Regarding her first full year at the French luxury fashion house, Clare has now shared that she has attempted to cater for the modern woman’s every wardrobe need, from suits to couture gowns.

“I think it’s very instinctive because I share a lot of facets of what other women want within their loves and consequently their wardrobe,” she told U.K. Harper’s Bazaar magazine. “I travel every week, so I know what that means in terms of how you think about the way you dress, and I am meeting people that are on a very high level, such as CEOs, as well as working in the atelier, so I’ve got an entire panorama of the daily activities of a working woman.”

Celebrities including Rihanna, Kendall Jenner, Rosamund Pike and Rebel Wilson have all worn Clare’s designs this year, but one of her most high-profile clients has to be Meghan, Duchess of Sussex.

The designer outfitted the former Suits actress in an elegant custom-made gown for her wedding to Prince Harry in May (18), and has created various other outfits for the new royal, including the black one-shoulder dress she wore to The Fashion Awards earlier this month, when Clare won Designer of the Year in the womenswear category.

“What was wonderful is that you build such an intimate relationship, because it’s so personal, there’s nothing else in the way, there’s no entourage. And it makes a very human connection, which is lovely… I think it really embodied her, and her values,” the 48-year-old shared of working with Meghan.

And while Clare is always looking to keep Givenchy fresh, she is adamant that she will always honour the tradition of founder Hubert de Givenchy, who passed away at the age of 91 in March.

“I feel really lucky and privileged that I managed to see him,” she smiled.

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Rosamund Pike worked with real refugees in A Private War

Rosamund Pike has opened up about the emotional impact of working with real refugees in new film A Private War.The British actress portrays Marie Colvin, a journalist who worked as a foreign affairs correspondent for British newspaper The Sunday Times …

Rosamund Pike has opened up about the emotional impact of working with real refugees in new film A Private War.

The British actress portrays Marie Colvin, a journalist who worked as a foreign affairs correspondent for British newspaper The Sunday Times from 1985 until her death in 2012, in the biographical drama directed by Matthew Heineman.

Much of the movie was shot in Jordan, with Rosamund now sharing how she was able to meet with Syrians, Iraqis, Libyans and Sri Lankans who had fled to the nation during wartime and how their stories deeply influenced her performance.

“(For one scene set) in the besieged city of Homs (in western Syria) there was one basement where all the women and children who were sheltering from gunfire were huddling together, and we recreated that basement in our set in Jordan,” she recalled during an interview with Collider. “And I walked into it and Matt said, ‘Ninety per cent of these women are from Homs, for 90 per cent of them, this was their truth.’ And (he) pointed out certain women that were prepared to tell their story and what I got was their truth and so the emotional impact of that was huge. It was a very, very blurred line between fiction and reality.”

Rosamund went on to describe how she experienced many “confusing” emotions while speaking with the refugees and appreciated how Matthew, who is known for his documentary films like City of Ghosts, spent so much time talking to the locals.

“It changed the energy so much, because Matthew, coming from a documentary background, literally interviewed hundreds of people who were displaced, people from various parts of the conflict region we were covering,” the 39-year-old said. “It was exciting, it was moving, I had so many confusing emotions during that, that it was quite troubling. And that happened again and again.”

A Private War, which also stars Tom Hollander, Jamie Dornan, and Stanley Tucci, is now showing at U.S. cinemas. It is due to open in the U.K. on 1 February 2019.

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Rosamund Pike refused to strip off to win James Bond role

Rosamund Pike refused to strip to her underwear during an audition for her role as a Bond girl in Die Another Day. The British actress was just 21 when she tried out for the role of double agent Miranda Frost in Pierce Brosnan’s final outing as 007 – …

Rosamund Pike refused to strip to her underwear during an audition for her role as a Bond girl in Die Another Day.

The British actress was just 21 when she tried out for the role of double agent Miranda Frost in Pierce Brosnan’s final outing as 007 – a part she eventually won.

In a chat for Audible Sessions, an interview series by Amazon’s audiobook publisher, the star revealed how she was asked to appear in a skimpy outfit and “drop” her dress during her audition for the 2002 film.

Revealing how she refused the request, Rosamund said: “Then on the day – I don’t know where I got the resolve and strength of mind at 21 – but I just thought, ‘Actually, sod that, if they’re going to see me in my underwear, they’d better give me the job.'”

The Gone Girl star, 39, explained that she was told to bring an evening dress to the audition and chose a costume her mother wore as an opera singer. However, the film’s costume designer then told her that the role required her to wear a more revealing outfit.

Rosamund explained: “He said, ‘That’s a very beautiful dress, but in Bond films we wear things a little more like this.’ And he held up three pieces of string and I realised I was way out of my depth.”

Although she agreed to put on the skimpier Bond girl dress, the star refused to go any further, adding: “So I put on this shimmering sheath, or whatever was the order of the day, but I didn’t drop it.”

Despite her worries about her initial audition and the male-dominated nature of the Bond films, the star said she had no problems on set – a fact she puts down to the franchise being produced by Barbara Broccoli – who refused to tolerate the kind of sexism recently exposed by the #MeToo movement.

“I look back over my experience on the Bond film and think, my goodness Barbara Broccoli was way ahead of all this #MeToo movement,” she said. “There wasn’t an ounce of feeling uncomfortable while I was on that set.”

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Rosamund Pike prefers to ‘disappear’ into her characters

Rosamund Pike prefers to hide behind her characters onscreen.The British actress gained fame after winning an Oscar nomination for her starring role in 2014’s Gone Girl, but has shied away from flashier, blockbuster roles in favour of more independent …

Rosamund Pike prefers to hide behind her characters onscreen.

The British actress gained fame after winning an Oscar nomination for her starring role in 2014’s Gone Girl, but has shied away from flashier, blockbuster roles in favour of more independent fare.

She is currently enjoying a run of playing real-life people, from Ruth Williams Khama in A United Kingdom to the title role in upcoming Marie Curie biopic Radioactive, and Rosamund admits she enjoys “hiding in plain sight”.

“I’m the kind of actor who’s more interested in disappearing than putting myself out there all the time,” she told Britain’s Total Film magazine. “I suppose the bona fide movie stars (are different), someone like Tom Cruise, who knows their brand very well and puts that energy out there again and again in a very brilliant way. I’m much more interested in disappearing and hiding in plain sight.”

She reveals that since her nomination the “floodgates are wide open” and she’s been offered roles that are better than ever. She’s therefore ended up working on back-to-back films, which have included western Hostiles, in which she plays a mother who loses her family in a Comanche Indian attack.

When it came to shooting the film, Rosamund, 39, admitted she disappeared into the character so much that she found the process quite traumatic.

“I had to live in a very, very dark place for a while,” she said. “It felt real. When I re-watch that, I feel it was something I lived rather than something I acted in.”

Her other upcoming roles include A Private War, in which she plays American war journalist Marie Colvin, and Entebbe, in which she plays Brigitte Kulhmann, a German-born terrorist who hijacked a plane from Tel Aviv to Paris in 1976.

However, she isn’t just after dark roles, as she revealed to the magazine that she wrote to director Rob Marshall asking to be considered for Mary Poppins Returns, without realising the role had already gone to Emily Blunt.

“(I said), ‘Just so you know, I would really love to be Mary Poppins’,” she confessed. “It’s worth putting your hat in the ring sometimes.”

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