Adam Lambert had ’70s-inspired suits custom-made for Velvet video

Adam Lambert can’t get enough of the ’70s-inspired suits he wears in his latest music video.The Whataya Want from Me singer recently dropped his new single Velvet, with the tune featuring on his fourth studio album of the same name.In the accompanying …

Adam Lambert can’t get enough of the ’70s-inspired suits he wears in his latest music video.

The Whataya Want from Me singer recently dropped his new single Velvet, with the tune featuring on his fourth studio album of the same name.

In the accompanying clip, Adam plays a tailor looking for love, and when they were coming up with ideas for the concept, the star and director Charlotte Rutherford immediately knew they wanted iconic Savile Row tailor Edward Sexton to create a series of boldly coloured outfits in order to perfectly convey the disco/glam rock vibe.

“A lot of the suits that I’ve been wearing lately were designed by a tailor in the U.K. – Edward Sexton. He made suits for Elton John and Mick Jagger, so that kind of inspired me to think, ‘Why don’t I act as a tailor?'” he recalled in a video interview for Harper’s Bazaar. “I love when clothes make you feel like there’s an occasion happening. Whether you’re socialising or working it tells a story, it communicates something to the people you are interacting with.”

In the video, Adam sports a custom-made crimson number and a blue velvet suit with green silk ruffled shirt. However, the white suit he donned during a wedding sequence was from his own wardrobe – with the look transformed via the help of some playful accessories.

“With the solo stuff right now, the sound has a look. Again, it’s this retro-inspired thing. There’s a little dash of ’70s New York pimp to it all. That’s what the album sounds like to me. I think that Velvet is a celebration. It has a lot of joy, I needed that to be part of the video. I want people to see the playfulness,” the 38-year-old smiled, adding that he hopes the video inspires his fans to get creative with their outfits. “To see us playing dress up. It always cracks me up the phrase, ‘I love that, I could never pull it off.’ That’s my favourite thing when I hear that. I go, ‘That’s nonsense.’ All you have to do to pull it off is have the desire to try it on. It’s tuning out what anyone else things. It’s dressing for yourself.”

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Stella McCartney ‘not a fan’ of cleaning clothes

Stella McCartney is “not a fan” of cleaning her clothes too often.With a focus on using sustainable and vegan-friendly fabrics, the British designer has expanded her brand since launching in 2001 to include swimwear, footwear, children’s clothes, and a…

Stella McCartney is “not a fan” of cleaning her clothes too often.

With a focus on using sustainable and vegan-friendly fabrics, the British designer has expanded her brand since launching in 2001 to include swimwear, footwear, children’s clothes, and activewear.

But while McCartney always appears impeccably dressed whenever she makes an appearance at an event, she has now shared that she does her best to avoid over-washing her garments.

“Basically, in life, rule of thumb: if you don’t absolutely have to clean anything, don’t clean it,” she said in an interview for The Observer. “I wouldn’t change my bra every day and I don’t just chuck stuff into a washing machine because it’s been worn. I am incredibly hygienic myself, but I’m not a fan of dry cleaning or any cleaning, really.”

McCartney went on to explain that she learned about the care of luxury fabrics during a stint studying the work of tailors on London’s Savile Row.

“And the rule on a bespoke suit is you do not clean it. You do not touch it. You let the dirt dry and you brush it off,” the 47-year-old insisted.

Elsewhere in the chat, McCartney spoke about her new company headquarters on Old Bond Street and the launch of her All Together Now collection, which was inspired by her father Paul McCartney and The Beatles’ 1968 film Yellow Submarine.

She also emphasised her commitment to sourcing eco-friendly materials, though confessed the process can be quite the challenge.

“If everyone else was sustainable, we could have a level playing field, so it does feel unfair – but it’s my choice and I believe very much in my reasons for working in that way. You know what? It’s not like I’m here for an easy life,” she added.

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Christian Dior exhibition to be staged at London’s V&A Museum

An exhibition of Christian Dior designs is to be staged at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.Based on the major exhibition Christian Dior: Couturier du Reve, organised by officials at the Musee des Arts Decoratifs in Paris, the retrospective wil…

An exhibition of Christian Dior designs is to be staged at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

Based on the major exhibition Christian Dior: Couturier du Reve, organised by officials at the Musee des Arts Decoratifs in Paris, the retrospective will be reimagined for the V&A next year (19).

Spanning 1947 to the present day, Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams, will trace the history and impact of one of the 20th century’s most influential couturiers, and the six artistic directors who have succeeded him, including John Galliano, Raf Simons and Maria Grazia Chiuri.

“Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams celebrates one of the most ingenious and iconic designers in fashion history. Reimagining this hugely popular exhibition from Paris – as the largest fashion exhibition the V&A has undertaken since Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty – will shed new light on Dior’s fascination with Britain,” said Tim Reeve, deputy director of the V&A, in a statement. “The V&A holds one of the largest and most important fashion collections in the world, and we are delighted to be able to reveal highlights from our outstanding collection alongside those from the remarkable archive of the House of Dior, for this spectacular exhibition.”

In addition to the original retrospective, the V&A exhibition will also include a section dedicated to designer Christian Dior’s links to Britain, such as his fascination with traditional gardens and penchant for Savile Row suits.

The brand new section will investigate Dior’s creative collaborations with influential U.K. manufacturers, and his most notable British clients, such as author Nancy Mitford, ballet dancer Margot Fonteyn and Princess Margaret.

“More than seventy years after its founding, the V&A’s exhibition will celebrate the enduring influence of the House of Dior and uncover Dior’s relationship with Britain,” added Oriole Cullen, fashion and textiles curator at the V&A.

Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams will run from 2 February until 14 July (19).

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