Jonathan Anderson tapped to create Moncler Genius line

Jonathan Anderson has been added to Moncler Genius’ roster of designers.The designer, who serves as creative director of his own label JW Anderson and Spanish fashion house Loewe, is to create garments for the lifestyle brand’s annual drop of capsule c…

Jonathan Anderson has been added to Moncler Genius’ roster of designers.

The designer, who serves as creative director of his own label JW Anderson and Spanish fashion house Loewe, is to create garments for the lifestyle brand’s annual drop of capsule collections.

“The Moncler Genius creative hub evolves and announces its 2020 line-up welcoming JW Anderson with his arrestingly clever vision of gender-defying fashion,” a Moncler representative said. “The Northern Irish designer brings a unique design aesthetic that offers a modern interpretation of masculinity and femininity through a cross-pollination of menswear and womenswear.”

Anderson will be joining Sergio Zambon and Veronica Leoni for 2 Moncler 1952, Sandro Mandrino for 3 Moncler Grenoble, Simone Rocha, Craig Green, Matthew Williams of 1017 ALYX 9SM, Fragment Hiroshi Fujiwara, Richard Quinn, and Poldo Dog Couture, in working with the company.

In addition, designers at Moncler are collaborating with the team at luggage brand Rimowa on a “bold new travel concept”.

Moncler chief executive officer Remo Ruffini has achieved great success with the guest designer model, which was first introduced three years ago, with company leaders thrilled with the ongoing interest.

“The values are solid and the shapes change constantly. It is a place where contemporary shapers of culture belonging to the world beyond Moncler are invited, in order to have other points of view on what the house stands for. Rapidity is the key,” they added. “The needs and the tastes of contemporary customers change at lightning speed. Fashion itself endlessly changes and morphs: Moncler Genius is a seismographer, and this is why it is always in flux.”

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Felicity Jones: ‘Headbands are the ultimate accessory’

Felicity Jones has named the humble headband as her ultimate fashion accessory.The Aeronauts actress always looks glamorous whenever she steps out onto the red carpet, typically opting for dramatic gowns and chic suits. But when it comes to her hair, F…

Felicity Jones has named the humble headband as her ultimate fashion accessory.

The Aeronauts actress always looks glamorous whenever she steps out onto the red carpet, typically opting for dramatic gowns and chic suits.

But when it comes to her hair, Felicity can’t go past a simple headband, such as Inca’s Black Padded Velvet Alice Headband.

“Headbands are practical: They can hide your hair if you haven’t washed it for a couple of days, which is always very useful. And they can dress up an outfit, if you’re feeling that it needs a bit more of an edge. They’re just kind of classic and timeless,” she told New York Magazine’s The Strategist. “If I have a black velvet headband or bow, I’m very happy. Occasionally, I’m partial to navy velvet, as well.”

Felicity went on to note that she would love to own a dark green headband, but she is yet to discover the perfect one. Elsewhere in the chat, the star noted that she adores dresses by Simone Rocha and always keeps a stash of Cle de Peau Beaute’s The Serum in her beauty kit.

“What I’ll often do is use it with a facial roller; I put it on overnight and it really feels like it’s deeply moisturising. I won’t do that every night – sometimes I just use a moisturiser – but if I’ve been flying and my skin is particularly dehydrated, or if I’m staying in a hotel with lots of air conditioning, then I’ll use this as a stronger overnight moisture treatment,” the 36-year-old, who serves as an ambassador for the skincare brand, shared. “I can also use it on my eyebrows – you know when you brush eyebrows to get that slick, slightly catwalk-y look to them? I like to use it for that.”

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British Fashion Council launching new award for designers

Officials at the British Fashion Council (BFC) have launched a new award for designers.In the run-up to The Fashion Awards 2019, set to take place on 2 December at the Royal Albert Hall in London, council members have announced that they are introducin…

Officials at the British Fashion Council (BFC) have launched a new award for designers.

In the run-up to The Fashion Awards 2019, set to take place on 2 December at the Royal Albert Hall in London, council members have announced that they are introducing the Designers’ Designer Award. The award coincides with the establishment of the BFC Membership Programme and has been created to spotlight the British designer businesses that have made a global impact in the past year through creativity in product design, campaigns, and collaborations.

Those nominated for the 2019 prize are Christopher Kane for Christopher Kane, Jonathan Anderson for JW Anderson, Margaret Howell for Margaret Howell, Roksanda Ilincic for Roksanda, and Simone Rocha for Simone Rocha.

“The creativity shown over the past year by the winner of this award is considered to have moved the needle in increasing their positive brand perception in 2019,” a BFC representative commented.

Meanwhile, the BFC Membership Programme has been founded to support the BFC’s mission to encourage collaboration and inclusivity, inviting designers to come together in support of the fashion ecosystem.

When it comes to the other awards, Bottega Veneta, Gucci, Jacquemus, Loewe, and Prada have been nominated in the Brand of the Year category, while Gucci’s Alessandro Michele, Bottega Veneta’s Daniel Lee, JW Anderson and Loewe creative director Jonathan Anderson, Dior Men’s Kim Jones, and Prada’s Miuccia Prada are all in the running for Designer of the Year.

Top models Adesuwa Aighewi, Adut Akech, Adwoa Aboah, Kaia Gerber, and Winnie Harlow are competing for the Model of the Year prize, while it was previously announced that Giorgio Armani will be bestowed with the Outstanding Achievement Award and Naomi Campbell will take home the Fashion Icon Award.

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Paloma Faith begs London Fashion Week to ditch fur

Paloma Faith has called on London Fashion Week to go fur-free.The prestigious fashion event kicks off in the U.K. capital from 14 September (18), and will showcase the latest collections from labels including Victoria Beckham, Simone Rocha and Burberry…

Paloma Faith has called on London Fashion Week to go fur-free.

The prestigious fashion event kicks off in the U.K. capital from 14 September (18), and will showcase the latest collections from labels including Victoria Beckham, Simone Rocha and Burberry.

However, Paloma has called upon the British Fashion Council (BFC) to implement meaningful change and forbid animal fur being used as part of any of the week’s events.

Teaming up with officials at People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the singer has sent a letter to the BFC pointing out that there is no longer a market for fur in Britain.

“The BFC shouldn’t be endorsing a material whose production is deemed so cruel that it is outlawed in the U.K.,” she wrote. “With the vast number of cutting-edge, eco-friendly faux furs available on the market today, I’m sure you’ll agree that there’s no longer any excuse for killing animals for their fur.”

This is not the first time Paloma has teamed up with animal rights organisation, having been tapped by PETA in 2014 to narrate a video exposing routine cruelty in the international fur trade.

Elsewhere in the letter, the Lullaby hitmaker also praised the efforts of British brands such as Stella McCartney and Vivienne Westwood, whose designs are 100 per cent fur-free.

“I’m proud to be from a country that leads the way with the world’s most exciting and compassionate designers and brands. Please respond to the progress we’re seeing for animals by introducing a no-fur policy at the BFC,” she implored the council.

A recent PETA poll found that 95 per cent of designers with a show or presentation at London Fashion Week in February didn’t use fur in their autumn/winter 2018 collections, including Burberry and Mulberry.

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Comme des Garcons launching direct-to-consumer brand

Comme des Garcons is gearing up to unveil a new direct-to-consumer brand.The fashion house was founded in Tokyo by Rei Kawakubo in 1969, with the label building up a reputation for its predominant use of black and distressed fabrics. In recent years, K…

Comme des Garcons is gearing up to unveil a new direct-to-consumer brand.

The fashion house was founded in Tokyo by Rei Kawakubo in 1969, with the label building up a reputation for its predominant use of black and distressed fabrics.

In recent years, Kawakubo has expanded Comme des Garcons to include casual line Comme des Garcons Play and menswear range Comme des Garcons Homme, with brand bosses now set to add another online-based category.

“Nobody knows yet, but what I can tell you is it’s going to be Internet-based,” said Comme des Garcons chief executive officer Adrian Joffe at the opening party for a Dover Street Market boutique in Beijing last week (ends01Apr18), adding that the “simple” range of men’s and womenswear will eventually be stocked in six stores around the world.

Further details about the line are being kept under wraps, including a potential release date. However, Joffe confirmed that Kawakubo was taking a hands-on approach and will even have a role in designing the website for the new label.

As well as having Comme des Garcons boutiques in Tokyo, Paris, New York, Hong Kong, Seoul, Singapore and Manila, the company has its clothes and accessories stocked in its market-based department store Dover Street Market in London, the market’s original location, New York, Tokyo and Singapore.

The boutiques also stock pieces from Balenciaga, Celine, Gucci, Junya Watanabe, Lanvin, Marni, Raf Simons, Saint Laurent and Vetements. Irish designer Simone Rocha also has her creations sold at Dover Street Market stores and has noted that the partnership has had a positive impact on her business.

“They have so much respect for young designers, and at the same time a huge amount of respect for heritage. Being a part of that is really special,” she told the publication.

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Anna Wintour: ‘Fashion Week does get a little repetitive’

Anna Wintour says that Fashion Week has become stuck in its ways.The U.S. Vogue editor was interviewed by her own publication on her London Fashion Week highlights after the event came to a close on Tuesday (20Feb18). Having sat front row for many of t…

Anna Wintour says that Fashion Week has become stuck in its ways.

The U.S. Vogue editor was interviewed by her own publication on her London Fashion Week highlights after the event came to a close on Tuesday (20Feb18).

Having sat front row for many of the catwalk show over the last six days, as well as in New York the week before, the fashion mogul opened up about the repetitive nature of Fashion Week.

“Fashion has to be about change and I think the show and the ritual of going to all the shows has become very stuck,” the 68-year-old said in a video posted on Vogue’s website. “You may see beautiful shows but because it’s always the same it does get a little repetitive.”

However, Anna went on to reveal that she’s been inspired by many of the collections that were unveiled by designers in both London and New York and applauded the individuals for helping to keep things fresh on the catwalk.

“The fact that we’re now seeing generations both in London and New York wanting to question everything and do it differently, how exciting and wonderful is that? That’s what fashion should be about,” she smiled.

The industry expert, who has been editor-in-chief of the famous fashion glossy since 1988, heaped praise on a number of British brands who showcased their latest lines in London, such as Erdem and Simone Rocha.

She was particularly complimentary towards Burberry’s fall/winter show, which marked the last collection by chief creative officer and president Christopher Bailey.

“It was an incredible last show. I think he summed up everything he believes in whether it’s gay rights, optimism, the spirit of youth, the spirit of London streets,” Anna said of the 46-year-old’s “emotional” final catwalk spectacle.

Anna also sat pride of place next to Queen Elizabeth II at Richard Quinn’s show on the final day of London Fashion Week. The designer was honoured with the inaugural Queen Elizabeth II Award for British Design, and his show marked the first time the Queen has ever taken in a Fashion Week presentation.

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Pierpaolo Piccioli tapped as part of Moncler’s new design supergroup

Pierpaolo Piccioli, Simone Rocha and Craig Green are among the eight new designers tapped by Moncler for its Genius design team.Following the departures of Giambattista Valli and Thom Browne from the Italian label’s Gamme Rouge and Gamme Bleu lines in …

Pierpaolo Piccioli, Simone Rocha and Craig Green are among the eight new designers tapped by Moncler for its Genius design team.

Following the departures of Giambattista Valli and Thom Browne from the Italian label’s Gamme Rouge and Gamme Bleu lines in November (17), Moncler has now unveiled a new design team initiative.

There will now be eight lines under the Moncler umbrella, headed up by Valentino designer Piccioli, Rocha, Green, Karl Templer, Sandro Mandrino, Kei Ninomiya, Hiroji Fujiwara and Francesco Ragazzi.

“A couple of years ago I saw this world is really changing,” said brand owner Remo Ruffini, according to Vogue.com. “This world is really much more fast. I don’t think there are seasons anymore, and I don’t think that shows (that look forward) six months’ time really help with the customer. And I said we have to do something new, I wanted to change the model of the business.”

A Moncler Genius show will be held on 20 February (18) at the Moncler Genius Building in Milan, the night before the city’s Fashion Week kicks off.

Talking about his new design job, Piccioli shared his excitement.

“The spirit of the project is something daring: It emphasises the value of creativity and talent,” he praised. “It is something challenging for me to work with totally different materials and the totally different DNA of the brand. Yes, it was like stretching my legs. The other designers are very interesting. But I said yes at the very beginning before I knew who they were. I’ve known Remo for some time, and I appreciate his way of thinking and managing the company.”

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