Gisele Bundchen ‘optimistic’ fashion industry can become sustainable

Gisele Bundchen is hopeful the fashion industry will be able to become much more sustainable.The Brazilian supermodel has opened up about her environmental activism in a new interview with U.S. Marie Claire magazine, and while there’s still significant…

Gisele Bundchen is hopeful the fashion industry will be able to become much more sustainable.

The Brazilian supermodel has opened up about her environmental activism in a new interview with U.S. Marie Claire magazine, and while there’s still significant work to be done, she’s confident that designers such as Stella McCartney are leading a rising wave of green fashion.

“I am optimistic about the fashion industry becoming more sustainable. Some fashion brands are shifting to use sustainable fabrics and being thoughtful in their approach to production, but there is still a lot of work to be done,” Gisele explained. “The fashion industry has the power to be a leader on a global scale and allocate resources toward the use of natural ingredients, sustainable materials, naturals dyes, and much more.

“Some fashion houses have started to incorporate real change. It’s my hope that more designers and brands will follow.”

The 39-year-old, who this year is celebrating her 11th year as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Environment Program, also revealed that she’s planning to plant 40,000 trees in her native Brazil in honour of her upcoming 40th birthday.

“Given the forest fires in the Amazon, the bush fires in Australia, and the devastating impact around the world, reforestation efforts are more crucial than ever,” she insisted.

And Gisele, who shares two children and a stepson with her husband Tom Brady, is determined to teach her family that they can help the planet too, and ensures they all use water filters, reduce plastic use, and take their own shopping bags.

“We do our best, but it can be challenging when it comes to living completely green – and that’s OK. I always remind my kids that every choice we make has an impact on our planet and that we always need to try our best; that’s what matters,” the star added.

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Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh join 2020 LVMH Prize jury

Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh are to help judge the 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers competition.Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designers …

Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh are to help judge the 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers competition.

Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designers competition open to designers from around the world who have produced at least two collections and who are under 40.

On Tuesday, organisers announced that this year’s winner will be announced at an event held at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris on 5 June, with McCartney and Louis Vuitton menswear designer Abloh among the panel.

Singer Rihanna, who launched her Fenty clothing label in partnership with the luxury conglomerate last year, will also be on the jury.

“For this seventh edition, I am delighted to announce the arrival of Virgil Abloh, former Prize finalist, Robyn Rihanna Fenty, and Stella McCartney in the jury of the LVMH Prize,” said Delphine Arnault, executive vice president of Louis Vuitton, in a statement. “They will be joining our prestigious panel which includes: Jonathan Anderson, Kris Van Assche, Nicolas Ghesquiere, Maria Grazia Chiuri, Marc Jacobs, Clare Waight Keller as well as Sidney Toledano, Jean-Paul Claverie and I. I wish to thank them for their involvement and their support to young creation. The prize is an incredible opportunity for these young designers to be appraised by them and to enjoy their advice.”

Those in the running for the 2020 LVMH Prize include New York-based designer Peter Do, British-Indian designer Supriya Lele, British menswear designer Priya Ahluwalia of Ahluwalia, French menswear designer Charaf Tajer of Casablanca, Emma Chopova and Laura Lowena of womenswear brand Chopova Lowena, London-based menswear designer Nicholas Daley, South African womenswear designer Sindiso Khumalo, and Japanese womenswear designer Tomotaka Koizumi of Tomo Koizumi.

The winner will take home $340,000 (£260,000) and receive support from executives at the company for 12 months.

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Stella McCartney swaps models for animal mascots at fall 20 show

Stella McCartney highlighted animal welfare at her latest fashion show by swapping some of the models for furry mascots.The British designer has been a trailblazer when it comes to sustainability in the industry, having committed to using eco-friendly …

Stella McCartney highlighted animal welfare at her latest fashion show by swapping some of the models for furry mascots.

The British designer has been a trailblazer when it comes to sustainability in the industry, having committed to using eco-friendly and cruelty-free materials in all of her products.

On Monday, McCartney unveiled her fall/winter 2020 collection at the Opera Garnier as part of Paris Fashion Week, with the presentation attracting the likes of Janelle Monae, Shailene Woodley, Caitriona Balfe, Ashley Benson, and Isabelle Huppert – though she stunned the crowd by having people dressed as cows, foxes, alligators, rabbits, and a horse walk the runway alongside the regular models.

“What we try to do here at Stella is to sugarcoat a powerful, meaningful message in a little bit of humour and fun, to make our point in a palatable and digestible way so that people listen,” the 48-year-old commented of the concept to The Guardian. “These animals are the ingredients of everyone else’s fashion shows. We are the only luxury fashion house in the world that isn’t killing animals on the runway. I wanted to make that point, but in a joyous way.”

Elsewhere, McCartney made efforts to reduce environmental impacts by reusing seating, sharing invites digitally, repurposing walls, and planting trees. As for the fashion, the designer took inspiration from the work of Russian-born French artist and illustrator Erte, with some of his archival works used for the first time as fashion prints.

“Erte’s artistic vision is translated into Stella’s aesthetic vocabulary. Featuring a compelling tension created by the feminisation of masculine clothing, sculptural silhouettes, and minimal embellishments are balanced with natural textures,” the show notes read. “True to Stella, the palette includes terrestrial tones of mineral, clay, sand, charcoal, walnut, and navy alongside punches of lilac and ginger.”

Highlights of the range included a dark dress with silver beading on the bodice, cosy coats, and oversized suiting.

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Amber Valletta appointed British Vogue’s sustainability editor

Amber Valletta has been named as British Vogue’s first-ever sustainability editor. The model/activist is known for championing sustainability, environmental protection, and speaking out against waste and climate change, with her even getting arrested …

Amber Valletta has been named as British Vogue’s first-ever sustainability editor.

The model/activist is known for championing sustainability, environmental protection, and speaking out against waste and climate change, with her even getting arrested at the Fire Drill Fridays climate change protest in Washington D.C. last year.

Valletta, 46, will now be putting her passion to good use in her new role as contributing sustainability editor, a new position at the publication. She will report to editor-in-chief Edward Enninful and help drive the magazine’s coverage about sustainability and the fashion industry’s impact on the environment.

“British Vogue is disrupting the entire fashion industry and it’s never been a more exciting time to join Edward and the team as contributing sustainability editor to support the positive conversations happening across the industry right now. I look forward to driving the momentum forward on sustainability at British Vogue,” she said in a statement.

Enninful added that he was thrilled to have Valletta onboard, given her level of expertise in the area.

“I’m thrilled to have Amber Valletta join British Vogue as contributing sustainability editor, honouring the British Vogue values of challenging the status quo, where she will help to shape and change conversations around the most pressing issue of our time: sustainability,” he shared. “Amber’s expertise around key environmental issues mixed with her love of fashion makes her the perfect voice to drive these conversations forward.”

Valletta follows in the footsteps of Livia Firth, co-founder and creative director of Eco-Age and founder of the Green Carpet Challenge, who was given a similar position at Vogue Arabia earlier this year. Designer Stella McCartney is also a sustainability adviser for luxury goods conglomerate Moet Hennessy – Louis Vuitton (LVMH).

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Adidas pledges to end plastic waste by 2024

Executives at Adidas have announced an ambitious plan to cut back on plastic waste.With sustainability and protecting the environment now at the forefront of many consumers’ minds, and plastic waste proving to be one of the biggest polluters of oceans …

Executives at Adidas have announced an ambitious plan to cut back on plastic waste.

With sustainability and protecting the environment now at the forefront of many consumers’ minds, and plastic waste proving to be one of the biggest polluters of oceans around the world, bosses at the German sportswear giant have committed to minimising use of the product through innovation and partnerships.

“We believe that through sport we have the power to change lives, and we are dedicated to creating that change,” said James Carnes, vice president of brand strategy. “Since 1998, we’ve been developing and introducing innovations to End Plastic Waste. Our commitment to eliminate the use of virgin polyester in our products by 2024 helps us get one step closer to being a more circular company.”

Since 2012, leaders at Adidas have backed sustainability-focused partners such as environmental organisation Parley for the Oceans and designer Stella McCartney.

But over the next decade, they are pledging to do much more, with 50 per cent of all polyester used in products to be recycled this year, key U.S. sports partners will transition to sustainable uniforms next year, and in 2024, Adidas will use only recycled polyester in all products across the business. Bosses hope to achieve climate neutrality by 2050.

The news comes after actor Jonah Hill announced he had directed Adidas Originals’ new team-themed campaign, titled Change Is a Team Sport, earlier this week. The advertisement features a diverse range of stars, including skater Jennifer Soto, actress Yara Shahidi, entertainer Kerwin Frost, K-pop sensation Blackpink, and Pharrell Williams.

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Amber Valletta hoping to fund sustainability documentary

Amber Valletta is looking to fund a documentary about sustainability in fashion. The model/actress is an outspoken advocate for the environment and climate change, with her even getting arrested last year for taking part in the Fire Drill Fridays prote…

Amber Valletta is looking to fund a documentary about sustainability in fashion.

The model/actress is an outspoken advocate for the environment and climate change, with her even getting arrested last year for taking part in the Fire Drill Fridays protests in Washington, D.C.

Valletta now hopes to take her passion and knowledge of the issues and channel them into a documentary titled The Changing Room, which would be aimed at fashion consumers.

“We want to educate and entertain fashion consumers on sustainability. Fashion has such an opportunity to be a change agent,” she told Porter magazine.

For those looking to shop ethically, Valletta recommends making luxury investments for staple items that can be worn again and again.

“Everyone can wear a tank top or a great T-shirt. Have a blouse or two. In general, luxury brands don’t overproduce, so they’re safe bets. I believe in a great blazer, a pair of boots, and tennis shoes. They’re my go-tos,” the 45-year-old advised.

Valletta, who took environmental-related classes at New York University in the early 2000s, is well aware that the fashion industry is lagging far behind others when it comes to sustainability and she remains confused by brands who don’t advertise their ethical efficiency.

“They’re afraid they’re not doing enough. My response is to at least put it on tags, like ingredients. The lack of transparency is causing us to stay in the 20th century. We’re already 20 years into the 21st century!” she commented.

Valletta recently teamed up with fashion designer Stella McCartney, another sustainability champion, to star in a Mother Earth-inspired fashion campaign that highlights the power of plants.

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Amber Valletta stars in Mother Earth-themed Stella McCartney campaign

Amber Valletta is fronting Stella McCartney’s Mother Earth-themed summer 2020 campaign.Like the British fashion designer, the model/actress is a vocal campaigner for sustainability in fashion, and has also been taking part in the Fire Drill Friday prot…

Amber Valletta is fronting Stella McCartney’s Mother Earth-themed summer 2020 campaign.

Like the British fashion designer, the model/actress is a vocal campaigner for sustainability in fashion, and has also been taking part in the Fire Drill Friday protests against climate change held in Washington, D.C.

Now, McCartney has tapped Valletta to star in her latest marketing imagery, which highlights the power of plants.

“The power of plants is seen in their resistance and constant renewal. Plant life will continually overcome diversity to grow, restore and regenerate,” a representative for the brand commented. “Humankind has had a long and important symbiotic relationship with plants, and they are a resource for many of our products. The new campaign images highlight that plant life has been on earth for 700 million years and despite the continued devastation of climate change, plants will continue to evolve and thrive.”

In one image captured by photographer Johnny Dufort, the 45-year-old poses in a green field while wearing a white shirt with a mask of leaves attached to her face. In another, she models a floral print dress in a lush forest setting.

“Enveloped in a lush living carpet of green, model Amber Valletta embodies everything the collection stands for; luxuriant, brave, defiant and fierce,” they added. “Wearing a photographic print of wild daisies shot by Stella herself, captured on her bicycle rides through the English countryside, the daisy’s natural beauty is placed onto flowing silk dresses with shots of binding colour bringing the fabric to life.”

To mark the launch of the campaign, McCartney is also launching the Plant Power face filter with Instagram.

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Stella McCartney launching biodegradable denim collection

Stella McCartney is gearing up to launch a collection of biodegradable denim.The British designer has been a trailblazer when it comes to sustainability in the fashion industry and creates all of her pieces using eco-friendly and cruelty-free materials…

Stella McCartney is gearing up to launch a collection of biodegradable denim.

The British designer has been a trailblazer when it comes to sustainability in the fashion industry and creates all of her pieces using eco-friendly and cruelty-free materials.

Now, McCartney has announced that she has partnered with bosses at Italian manufacturer Candiani to create a range of biodegradable, stretch denim using plant-based yarns for her autumn 2020 line.

The collection features 10 pieces in two styles made with Candiani’s patented COREVA Stretch Technology, which is created using organic cotton wrapped around a natural rubber core. The resulting fabric is free from plastics and micro-plastic.

“In a world where resources are diminishing and landfills are overflowing with discarded garments, it’s our duty to look for renewable resources, in addition to biodegradable and compostable materials,” said Alberto Candiani, owner of the Candiani family mill. “Denim has to take the lead as the indigo flag of this revolution, and we are thrilled to be working alongside Stella McCartney to share our innovation and beliefs with the wider fashion industry.”

In addition, the new denim fabric will be dyed with a biodegradable ingredient derived from mushrooms and seaweed called Kitotex Vegetal, and Indigo Juice, which keeps the indigo superficial on the yarn.

“Both of these technologies reduce the consumption of water, energy, and chemicals used in the dyeing and laundry processes,” a representative for the brand added.

McCartney’s autumn 2020 collection will drop in May.

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Tom Ford ‘quite torn’ over eco-friendly fashion

Tom Ford has admitted he’s “quite torn” about changing his designs and materials to become sustainable.In a new interview with his friend Livia Firth for Vogue Arabia, the designer discussed the cruelty-free fashion movement and the ways in which his f…

Tom Ford has admitted he’s “quite torn” about changing his designs and materials to become sustainable.

In a new interview with his friend Livia Firth for Vogue Arabia, the designer discussed the cruelty-free fashion movement and the ways in which his fellow designers such as Stella McCartney are championing vegan-friendly products.

Ford was asked by eco-activist Firth about how he’s making his luxury clothes sustainable, and he opened up on his struggle to combine his chic ideas with alternative materials.

“I’m quite torn. I’m torn over natural leather and fur versus fake, because fake fur takes thousands of years to biodegrade whereas fur biodegrades in six months,” he explained, adding that he also still uses polyester, which is produced using harmful chemicals and high emissions. “If you’re using real fur then there’s the cruelty to animals, which is horrible, but you could also use fur that is a food by-product. But then, of course, you’re polluting the planet because of the methane from the cattle. So, what is the best solution?”

While the 58-year-old did reveal he has changed the finishing lacquers used on his collections and is cutting down on packaging, he also confessed that he isn’t addressing the problems fast fashion is creating, despite serving as chairman of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA).

“For me, with the kind of customer I have, fashion has not changed. I’m still making jackets in the way they would’ve been made 75 years ago and I’m doing the same with evening dresses,” Ford stated. “I don’t address a lot of the problems that fast fashion certainly has to address or be held accountable for. In my niche of an industry it has not changed, except the packaging.”

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Stella McCartney ‘proud’ to design Joaquin Phoenix’s awards season tuxedo

Stella McCartney is “proud” to have designed Joaquin Phoenix’s sustainable awards season suit. The 45-year-old star beat the likes of Adam Driver, Antonio Banderas, Christian Bale, and Jonathan Pryce to win the Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama p…

Stella McCartney is “proud” to have designed Joaquin Phoenix’s sustainable awards season suit.

The 45-year-old star beat the likes of Adam Driver, Antonio Banderas, Christian Bale, and Jonathan Pryce to win the Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama prize for his portrayal of iconic comic book villain Joker in the film of the same name at the Golden Globe Awards in Los Angeles on Sunday.

Phoenix wore a black tuxedo by the British designer and accompanied the outfit with a crisp white shirt, black bow tie, and Garrett Leight California Optical sunglasses.

Accordingly, McCartney praised the actor for choosing a custom-made tuxedo that was created with sustainable materials that haven’t been tested on animals, in keeping with her vegetarian brand’s ethos, and wearing the same outfit for the whole awards season.

“This man is a winner… wearing custom Stella because he chooses to make choices for the future of the planet and all of its creatures,” she wrote on Instagram besides photos of Phoenix with his award. “He has also chosen to wear this same Tux for the entire award season to reduce waste. I am proud and honoured to join forces with you Joaquin, keep inspiring and keep shining your light x Stella.”

The Golden Globe winner, who is a vegan and an animal rights campaigner, has previously worn McCartney designs on the red carpet. He sported one of her tuxedos to the premiere of Joker at the Venice Film Festival in August and when he won the Best Actor prize at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival in France for his performance in You Were Never Really Here.

Phoenix took his animal rights campaigning one step further this year, as he successfully lobbied Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) officials to serve a vegan meal at the prizegiving on Sunday. His representative confirmed the news to New York Post’s gossip column Page Six.

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