Temperley London unveils debut handbag collection

Alice Temperley has unveiled Temperley London’s very first collection of handbags.The British designer is known for her vintage-inspired gowns and embellished minidresses, with her celebrity clients including the likes of Penelope Cruz, Halle Berry, Ev…

Alice Temperley has unveiled Temperley London’s very first collection of handbags.

The British designer is known for her vintage-inspired gowns and embellished minidresses, with her celebrity clients including the likes of Penelope Cruz, Halle Berry, Eva Mendes, and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge.

However, Temperley has now decided to branch out into the world of accessories, dropping six new styles of bags.

“I am excited for everyone to see what we have created and hope everyone loves the designs as much as I do,” she commented, while a brand representative stated: “We are excited to announce the launch of our new accessories collection which will be showcased for the first-time during London Fashion Week and is available to pre-order online now. The collection is focused on timeless elegance, featuring six functional and iconic styles available in three classic colours; Somerset Green, Burnt Umber and Black. Designed to become a classic staple of the Temperley London woman, taking her from day to night.”

The winter 2020 range includes the Alice Handbag, a classic everyday style, the Florence Circle Bag, an on-trend round bag, and the Clementine Tote bag.

The items, which are named after members of the designer’s family, are priced from $840 – $1,822 (£650-£1,400) and are now available to pre-order.

“We thought long and hard, not only to identify the right supply chain and high standard of quality required, but also to be able to understand what our loyal clients were expecting from us,” chief executive officer Luca Donnini added.

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Extinction Rebellion activists stage ‘funeral’ at London Fashion Week

Extinction Rebellion activists staged a “funeral” procession on the last day of London Fashion Week.The socio-political movement was established in May 2018, with members seeking to protest against climate breakdown and biodiversity loss, and the demon…

Extinction Rebellion activists staged a “funeral” procession on the last day of London Fashion Week.

The socio-political movement was established in May 2018, with members seeking to protest against climate breakdown and biodiversity loss, and the demonstrations ramped up in April, when activists occupied five prominent sites in central London.

Organisers at Extinction Rebellion took aim at the U.K. fashion industry by convening in Trafalgar Square on Tuesday evening, with participants wearing veils and funeral attire.

After marching through the streets, the protest concluded with people gathering around two black coffins and throwing flowers to symbolise the “death” of fast fashion and to “grieve for all that is lost”.

“Fashion is one of the most polluting industries in the world; it is also one of the most influential. During fashion month, the industry travels to global destinations to parade, see and buy fashion but London Fashion Week also sets a global precedent,” a spokesperson said in a statement. “It helps create the desire that results in the consumption of fast fashion and beyond. Fashion should be a cultural signifier of our times, yet the industry still adheres to an archaic system of seasonal fashion, adding pressure to relentlessly create new fashion from new materials.”

Last week, Extinction Rebellion protesters also conducted “die-ins” outside of the main entrance of the official trade show, with members donning white dresses featuring “bleeding hearts” glued to the front.

Officials at the British Fashion Council have not issued an official statement in response to the protests.

Temperley London, Molly Goddard, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi, Victoria Beckham, Emilia Wickstead, Erdem, and Burberry all held presentations during London Fashion Week.

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Burberry burns excess stock worth millions each year – report

Burberry reportedly burned over $36 million (£28 million) worth of stock in the past year.Reporters at The Times have investigated what big name brands do with old stock, and in shocking findings, discovered that Burberry, which is helmed by new chief…

Burberry reportedly burned over $36 million (£28 million) worth of stock in the past year.

Reporters at The Times have investigated what big name brands do with old stock, and in shocking findings, discovered that Burberry, which is helmed by new chief creative officer Riccardo Tisci, gets rid of large amounts of stock every year, with a staggering $117 million (£90 million) destroyed in the past five years.

Burberry executives admitted to the publication that they burn unwanted stock. However, they claimed to work with “specialist incinerators” that are able to harness the energy from the process.

Stars like Cara Delevingne, Kate Moss, Eddie Redmayne, Emma Watson, James Bay and Romeo Beckham have starred in the English heritage brand’s past campaigns, but it seems the clothes they model are not intended for everyone, with the publication reporting that Burberry, famous for its chequered print and trench coat, and other high end-labels dispose of clothes in a bid to stop them being worn by the “wrong people” after finding their way onto “grey markets” at discounted prices.

In the report, it was noted that Burberry shareholders are not happy with the destruction process, and at the brand’s recent annual meeting, questioned why the clothes and cosmetics were not offered to the company’s private investors.

Since October (17), the label has been donating leather waste to London-based reclaimed brand Elvis & Kresse so they can be turned into new accessories.

Swedish retailer H&M, sports giant Nike and Swiss watchmaker Richemont also destroy old stock, either because garments are in poor condition or to stop them being sold for discount prices.

Speaking to The Times, a representative from Temperley London explained that unwanted stock is donated to charity Women for Women or sent to its discount outlet in Oxford, England. Other labels, including Vivienne Westwood, Paul Smith and Victoria Beckham, chose not to comment.

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