Laura Mulleavy talks enduring influence of cinema on Rodarte’s designs

Rodarte designer Laura Mulleavy credits Hollywood’s influence as shaping her as a designer.The California-based fashion star, who co-founded and runs the label with her sister Kate Mulleavy, is big on movies, which she is certain is down to her life gr…

Rodarte designer Laura Mulleavy credits Hollywood’s influence as shaping her as a designer.

The California-based fashion star, who co-founded and runs the label with her sister Kate Mulleavy, is big on movies, which she is certain is down to her life growing up just next to Tinseltown.

She and Kate once considered moving their brand to America’s fashion capital, New York, but U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour convinced them to stay put.

“Overall, I think there’s always been a strong fashion community in Los Angeles; it’s just been through a different lens,” Laura told The Hollywood Reporter. “We have (James) Galanos and Rudi Gernreich and Bob Mackie, and then you have the history of Hollywood costume design, which is so profound on fashion in general. I always looked to film as something that really affected my view of design and my aesthetic.”

As for which films had a lasting impact on Laura, she insisted that the work of horror director Alfred Hitchcock comes out on top. It was the designer’s mother who introduced her to cinema at a young age, and she has been enthralled with it ever since.

“Hitchcock was a big part of my understanding of fashion design and Hollywood,” she explained. “Vertigo was shot at places I used to go to and I know the areas in San Francisco where The Birds (was shot).

“It’s the same thing in L.A. The street corner in Pasadena is Michael Myers’ house (from Halloween). You know the city through these locations in cinema. Because we responded so much to the visual styling of film, fashion just became a part of what Los Angeles is to us. When you see incredible costumes in a film, it’s a very powerful thing that you never get out of your head.”

© Cover Media

Tippi Hedren is new fortune teller muse for Gucci

Movie veteran Tippi Hedren has landed a major new fashion deal with Gucci. The Birds star, who is mother to Melanie Griffith and the grandmother of Fifty Shades of Grey star Dakota Johnson, will front the style house’s new timepieces and jewellery cam…

Movie veteran Tippi Hedren has landed a major new fashion deal with Gucci.

The Birds star, who is mother to Melanie Griffith and the grandmother of Fifty Shades of Grey star Dakota Johnson, will front the style house’s new timepieces and jewellery campaign.

Hedren, who also runs the Shambala Preserve wildlife sanctuary in California, will portray a fortune teller in the new ads, shot by Colin Dodgson.

Set in Los Angeles, the actress’ mysterious character offers readings to models Victoria Schons, Emily Unkles, Tom Atton Moore and Tex Santos-Shaw.

Tippi isn’t the only member of her acting family to impress Gucci bosses – Johnson was picked to front the Gucci Bloom fragrance campaign by the company’s creative director Alessandro Michele.

A short video features close-ups of the Gucci Ouroboros, GG Running and Le Marche des Merveilles fine jewellery collections and the G-Frame and G-Timeless timepieces – all modelled by the movie legend.

The new campaign comes shortly after Tippi, 88, went public with a severe and painful vertebrae issue.

She told WENN she underwent a 10-hour operation on the vertebrae in her neck in 2014, and spent much of 2015 nursing her pain.

“I had seen my MD (doctor of medicine) to stop my constant headaches and he looked at the MRI and said, ‘How are you holding up your head?'” the veteran actress said. “He showed me the evidence of the problem existed in the vertebrae in my neck. Next minute, I was in the hospital.

“The day after the operation my truly brilliant Dr. Kavenfar explained it would take a full year before I would be feeling well, and for the anaesthesia to leave my body. For eight to nine months I would have to wear a Miami neck brace 24/7… After that, it would take another several months for my vertebrae to heal.”

Tippi admitted her comeback has been slow, adding, “I tried working, several times, but found it exhausting… I didn’t want to believe my MD about that long year it would take for me to feel good again. And I have to remember, I am beginning the last half of my eighties. I keep forgetting that.”

© Cover Media