Kristin Scott Thomas to be honoured at British Independent Film Awards

Kristin Scott Thomas is to receive a special honour at the 2019 British Independent Film Awards (BIFAs). The English Patient actress will receive the Richard Harris Award for her outstanding contribution to British film at the Old Billingsgate in Londo…

Kristin Scott Thomas is to receive a special honour at the 2019 British Independent Film Awards (BIFAs).

The English Patient actress will receive the Richard Harris Award for her outstanding contribution to British film at the Old Billingsgate in London on 1 December.

“To be recognised in memory of the great and unequalled Richard Harris is very special, and a true honour,” Thomas said in a statement to Variety. “I am proud beyond measure to be receiving this award and joining the ranks of many famously and undeniably brilliant and talented actors.”

The Richard Harris Award, named after the late Irish actor, has previously been presented to the likes of Judi Dench, Daniel Day-Lewis, Emma Thompson, Julie Walters, Jim Broadbent, and Chiwetel Ejiofor.

“Kristin Scott Thomas has created many memorable characters in iconic British films,” said Harris’ son, Chernobyl star Jared Harris. “Whether she is making us laugh, cry or shake in our shoes, it is always in that inimitable Kristin Scott Thomas way. The Richard Harris Award at this year’s BIFAs is richly deserved.”

The Four Weddings and a Funeral star has received three BIFA nominations throughout her career, for her supporting roles in Easy Virtue, Nowhere Boy, and The Invisible Woman.

The Personal History of David Copperfield, Armando Iannucci’s comedic take on Charles Dickens’s classic novel, was revealed as the top contender when the nominations were read out at the end of October.

It landed 11 nominations, in categories such as Best British Independent Film, Best Screenplay, Best Actor for Dev Patel and Best Supporting Actor and Actress for Hugh Laurie and Tilda Swinton, respectively. It will have close competition from Wild Rose, In Fabric, and The Souvenir.

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Ralph Fiennes doesn’t like shouting at actors on set

Ralph Fiennes has adopted a persuasive attitude as a director.The English Patient star recently stepped behind the camera for the third time, for The White Crow, a biopic of Soviet ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev.Although the 56-year-old admits he often i…

Ralph Fiennes has adopted a persuasive attitude as a director.

The English Patient star recently stepped behind the camera for the third time, for The White Crow, a biopic of Soviet ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev.

Although the 56-year-old admits he often insists actors stick to his vision, the mild-mannered star likes to gently urge rather than shout and scream.

“I know I’m quite vocal,” he tells British magazine Reader’s Digest. “I sometimes have to say, ‘No it has to be like this’. But I think the thing to say, ‘Yes, that’s interesting but what happens if we go here? One of the basic things about directing is not to close a door. You don’t want to close down the confidence of an actor who’s exploring and that’s really important.”

Ralph has modelled his softly spoken style on his English Patient director, the late Anthony Minghella – whom he credits with allowing him to open up as an actor.

“Anthony Minghella had a very particular, gentle, probing style,” he explains. “I think he genuinely wanted to see what an actor could reveal for him, and bring to a line or moment.”

Another inspiration was his writer mother Jennifer’s attitude to his decision to go into acting – one she fully supported when he told her while studying at London’s Chelsea College of Art.

He adds: “The art school atmosphere was designed to push you to be inquisitive and curious and something about it gave me the confidence to say, ‘This is what I need to do’. Once I said that to my mother, it was as if she’d been waiting for me to say it. She was completely behind it.”

The White Crow is in cinemas now.

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