Diane Keaton’s Annie Hall look inspired by The Godfather shoot

Diane Keaton crafted her iconic Annie Hall look after being introduced to unique fashion choices on the set of The Godfather. The actress, who filmed Francis Ford Coppola’s classic movie in the early 1970s, has now recalled in an interview for the Aug…

Diane Keaton crafted her iconic Annie Hall look after being introduced to unique fashion choices on the set of The Godfather.

The actress, who filmed Francis Ford Coppola’s classic movie in the early 1970s, has now recalled in an interview for the August 2019 issue of InStyle magazine how she discovered a gender-bending sense of style during the shoot.

“The truth is, it was on The Godfather. Dean Tavoularis was the production designer, and he was with this beautiful French girl,” she told the publication of what really led to her the highly sought-after costume. “She had on a hat that was like something you’d see Cary Grant or one of those guys wear. It made me think, ‘Buy hats.’ I thought, ‘God, that would be good. I could do that.’ Which is the story of my life. ‘I could copy this. I could copy that.'”

These days, the star finds it hard to select new clothing without going the traditional route of in-store browsing, admitting she finds online shopping far less appealing.

“My daughter, Dexter, is an online shopper. I think she’s crazy,” she shared. “Part of the great joy is just being in the stores. It’s sad what’s happening to them. They’re just closing, and people are doing exactly what you’re telling me (buying online). It’s like, ‘Stop! How can you do that? You don’t know what it’s going to look like on you!'”

The 73-year-old is also a devotee of several high-end shops that carry “unusual” designers.

“I like Egg in London. Comme des Garcons. Noodle Stories in L.A. Dover Street Market,” she listed. “They carry all these unusual designers doing all kinds of things. I like Thom Browne, and I still love Ralph Lauren suits. They’re so well structured. And (Maison) Margiela.”

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Francis Ford Coppola couldn’t secure finance for Apocalypse Now

Francis Ford Coppola had to finance Apocalypse Now with the money he made from The Godfather as nobody wanted to touch it.The legendary filmmaker’s 1979 masterpiece is one of cinema’s most famous films, but Coppola struggled to get his Vietnam war …

Francis Ford Coppola had to finance Apocalypse Now with the money he made from The Godfather as nobody wanted to touch it.

The legendary filmmaker’s 1979 masterpiece is one of cinema’s most famous films, but Coppola struggled to get his Vietnam war epic made.

At the time, no one had made a feature on the conflict, and the young director found it impossible to secure funding for the movie.

“The Godfather was very formal and classical. The styles of my movies were very, very different,” Coppola said during a recent talk at the Tribeca Film Festival. “So, basically, nobody wanted to do Apocalypse Now, no actors wanted to go to the Philippines, and I was very confused about the situation.

“Ultimately, the deal I did had to guarantee a budget, and I used the money I had earned with The Godfather, so in truth, what happened was that the movie was so uncertain.”

Eventually, Marlon Brando, whose career was revived after Coppola cast him as Don Vito Corleone in 1972’s The Godfather, signed on, along with Martin Sheen and Robert Duvall.

The film went on to win two Oscars and was nominated for a further six – though it ran into trouble during production when it went way over budget, and critics originally called it a disaster.

“My thinking was, ‘Oh, we’re never going to be able to survive this.’ Interest rates in those days, you couldn’t imagine it today, it was over 26 per cent, and I think I owed about $30 million. I didn’t have the kind of money like that at all, and I was just so scared. I had three kids and a family,” the five-time Oscar-winning director recalled.

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Francis Ford Coppola set to direct long-delayed sci-fi movie Megalopolis

Francis Ford Coppola wants to start production on his long-delayed sci-fi epic Megalopolis this year (19).The Oscar-winning filmmaker, who will celebrate his 80th birthday on Sunday (07Apr19), has eyed plans to direct the feature film, a story about th…

Francis Ford Coppola wants to start production on his long-delayed sci-fi epic Megalopolis this year (19).

The Oscar-winning filmmaker, who will celebrate his 80th birthday on Sunday (07Apr19), has eyed plans to direct the feature film, a story about the aftermath and reconstruction of New York City after a mega-disaster, for many years, though abandoned the project after the September 11 terror attacks in 2001.

Coppola had confirmed that he had shelved Megalopolis in 2007 but indicated that he was open to returning to the concept, and on Wednesday, he told a reporter at Deadline that he was not only ready to make the movie, but would direct it too.

“I plan this year to begin my longstanding ambition to make a major work utilising all I have learned during my long career, beginning at age 16 doing theatre, and that will be an epic on a grand scale, which I’ve entitled Megalopolis,” he said. “It is unusual; it will be a production on a grand scale with a large cast. It makes use of all of my years of trying films in different styles and types culminating in what I think is my own voice and aspiration.”

Coppola went on to explain that Megalopolis would not be a “mainstream” film, and that he intends to kick off production in the near future.

According to Deadline, the film’s script is completed, and The Godfather director has already begun “informal” talks with potential stars, with British actor Jude Law apparently among the names being discussed.

The news comes as Coppola is gearing up to release Apocalypse Now: Final Cut on 28 April as part of the Tribeca Film Festival. The new, never-before-seen restored version of the 1979 war film, which starred Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, and Martin Sheen, comes 40 years after the original and 18 years after the extended version, Apocalypse Now Redux.

Coppola has most recently acted as executive producer on films like 2013’s The Bling Ring and 2012’s On the Road, and wrote and directed 2011’s Twixt.

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Francis Ford Coppola pens introduction to 50th anniversary edition of The Godfather novel

Francis Ford Coppola has written a heartfelt introduction to the 50th anniversary edition of Mario Puzo’s novel The Godfather. The story served as the basis for the director’s 1972 film of the same name and the Oscar winner has expressed his love for …

Francis Ford Coppola has written a heartfelt introduction to the 50th anniversary edition of Mario Puzo’s novel The Godfather.

The story served as the basis for the director’s 1972 film of the same name and the Oscar winner has expressed his love for the source material and how it changed his life in the newly-released prologue.

“After the success of the movie The Godfather, I was in seventh heaven, the young man who’d caught lightning in a bottle,” he writes. “It was a heady time and a shock to a shy kid from Queens, a perpetually bad student who had been temporarily paralyzed by polio.”

Coppola reflects on his initial aversion to the book, which he dismissed as “a potboiler (work of art made solely for money) filled with sex and silliness” after reading it for the first time, but upon further reflection he connected to the family element on the story and decided it should be the main focus of his big screen adaptation.

“I knew I was being considered to direct it and my first reaction was to turn it down,” he adds. “But needing the money and a film offer very badly, I decided to read it again and this time make careful notes. What I discovered was that lurking within was a great story, almost classical in its nature; that of a king with three sons, each of whom had inherited an aspect of his personality. I thought that if I could just extract that part of the book and make the film about that, then I could work up some enthusiasm for it.”

The 79 year old also shares warm memories from his personal relationship with the author, who he grew close to during production.

“As much as I admired his talent, his way of expressing himself on and off the page, I just loved to be around him,” he writes. “I loved him like a favorite uncle. He was so much fun to be with, so warm and wise, funny and affectionate.”

Puzo died in 1999 at the age of 78.

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Emilia Wickstead shows off a glamorous side to gangsters at LFW

Emilia Wickstead presented her interpretation of mobster chic at London Fashion Week on Monday (18Feb19).The New Zealand-born designer is known for dressing the regal and the royal, including The Crown’s Olivia Colman and Catherine, Duchess of Cambri…

Emilia Wickstead presented her interpretation of mobster chic at London Fashion Week on Monday (18Feb19).

The New Zealand-born designer is known for dressing the regal and the royal, including The Crown’s Olivia Colman and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge. But her London Fashion Week Fall/ Winter 19 show had a much less British feel, with Wickstead taking her inspiration from the Mafia, more specifically, Mary Corleone, played by Sofia Coppola in 1991 movie The Godfather Part III.

Mannish cuts dominated, with brown overcoats, a belted wool jumpsuit in the same chocolate shade, and suit trousers all with a distinct gangster flair to them.

“I was engrossed in the film! I don’t know how many times I watched it. A lot,” Wickstead said backstage, according to British Vogue.

“I wanted it to feel like that Sicilian gangster world, the lighting, the space, I even fell in love with the wicker chairs.”

Mobster glamour gave way to couture-esque gowns, in bold shades of yellow, green, blue and red. The glamorous pieces appeared in a variety of cuts, as well as colours, like a showstopping off-the-shoulder floor-sweeping red gown and a voluminous leopard print dress with a neckline slashed to the navel.

Christopher Kane also showed on Monday, showcasing his usual youthful edge in his latest collection.

Taking his inspiration from people’s personal fetishes, there were lots of shiny, fluffy and lacy fabrics on display. His “cupcake skirts” seen on a variety of dresses as peplums and as standalone skirts, were a highlight.

“Really pronounced. Lots of crinoline to make them more exaggerated. That shape is so good. That cupcake felt really good. That elevation, almost like a balloon,” he said of the cut.

On Tuesday, Zandra Rhodes Richard Quinn and Bethany Williams, the recipient of the second Queen Elizabeth II Prize for Design, will help bring London Fashion Week to a close.

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James Cameron fed up of Marvel’s Avenger movies

Filmmaker James Cameron is counting on cinema-goers soon experiencing “Avenger fatigue” as he is fed up of the Marvel superhero movies. The Oscar-winning director admits he is weary of the sheer volume of comic book adaptations currently being release…

Filmmaker James Cameron is counting on cinema-goers soon experiencing “Avenger fatigue” as he is fed up of the Marvel superhero movies.

The Oscar-winning director admits he is weary of the sheer volume of comic book adaptations currently being released – with the majority all revolving around male egos.

“I’m hoping we’re going to start getting Avenger fatigue,” Cameron complained at a press event to promote his new documentary show, AMC Visionaries: James Cameron’s Story of Science Fiction.

“Not that I don’t love the movies. It’s just, come on, guys, there are other stories to tell besides, you know, hypogonadal males without families doing death-defying things for two hours and wrecking cities in the process,” he added.

Cameron, who recently drew criticism for slamming Patty Jenkins’ Wonder Woman blockbuster for focusing on “an objectified icon”, would instead prefer to see movies with more depth, just like his four planned Avatar sequels, which he compares to the iconic The Godfather trilogy, directed by Francis Ford Coppola.

“I found myself as a father of five, starting to think about what would an Avatar story be like if it was a family drama, if it was The Godfather,” the 63-year-old explained. “Obviously very different genre…, but I got intrigued by that idea. So, that’s really what it is. It’s a generational family saga.”

He reveals the forthcoming movies are “very different” to the first Avatar film, which starred Sam Worthington and Zoe Saldana, and has gone on to make more than $2.7 billion at the box office worldwide since its release in 2009.

“Now, it’s the same type of setting, and there’s the same respect for the shock of the new, that we want to show you things that not only you haven’t seen, but haven’t imagined. I think that’s absolutely critical to it. But the story’s very different,” he said. “It’s a continuation of the same characters, but what happens when warriors that are willing to go on suicide charges, and leap off cliffs onto the back of big orange toruks (airborne predatory animals), what happens when they grow up and have their own kids? It becomes a very different story.

“Now the kids are the risk-takers and the change-makers. So, it’s interesting, but it makes sense to me. Everybody’s either a parent, or they had parents at the very least, and if you look at the big successful franchises now, they’re pretty much uninterested in that.”

Avatar 2 is scheduled for release in December, 2020.

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