Wonder Woman 1984 producer insists movie will get theatrical run

Representatives for Wonder Woman 1984 have shot down a report suggesting the blockbuster will be released straight to video-on-demand due to the coronavirus crisis.Many cinemas around the world have been closed to help curb the spread of Covid-19, with…

Representatives for Wonder Woman 1984 have shot down a report suggesting the blockbuster will be released straight to video-on-demand due to the coronavirus crisis.

Many cinemas around the world have been closed to help curb the spread of Covid-19, with the release of numerous upcoming blockbusters being postponed until movie theatres re-open.

The Wonder Woman sequel, starring Gal Gadot as the superhero, is still set for release on 5 June, but a report published last week speculated it would skip the cinemas altogether and head straight for streaming or digital services.

This report was swiftly denied by studio Warner Bros., with president of domestic distribution, Jeff Goldstein, telling The Wrap, “We’re looking to release the movie theatrically, that’s our plan.”

Charles Roven, a producer on the film, also told the publication, “It’s ludicrous if you consider how big a movie this is… Everybody recognises that, as interesting as streaming might be, if you want a huge, global worldwide box office, you’ve got to release it in a movie theater.”

Representatives for Warner Bros. also confirmed to IndieWire that they remain committed to giving the DC Comics movie, directed by Patty Jenkins, a full theatrical run.

Many movies that were showing in cinemas at their time of closure, such as The Hunt, Emma, and The Invisible Man, have received early digital releases. On Friday, Disney bosses also announced that they were following suit by making their latest Disney/Pixar animation Onward available to buy digitally that day. It will be available on Disney+ on 3 April for U.S. customers.

“While we’re looking forward to audiences enjoying our films on the big screen again soon, given the current circumstances, we are pleased to release this fun, adventurous film to digital platforms early for audiences to enjoy from the comfort of their homes,” said director Dan Scanlon and producer Kori Rae.

In addition, Paramount executives have decided to release The Lovebirds, a comedy starring Issa Rae and Kumail Nanjiani, on Netflix after postponing its original 3 April cinema release.

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Trolls World Tour to debut at home and in cinemas simultaneously

Animated sequel Trolls World Tour will be released on home entertainment and cinemas on the same day due to the impact the coronavirus crisis is having on theatrical releases.After big blockbusters such as No Time to Die, Fast and Furious 9, A Quiet Pl…

Animated sequel Trolls World Tour will be released on home entertainment and cinemas on the same day due to the impact the coronavirus crisis is having on theatrical releases.

After big blockbusters such as No Time to Die, Fast and Furious 9, A Quiet Place Part II, and Mulan postponed their releases, the animation, which features a voice cast led by Anna Kendrick and Justin Timberlake, was thought to be the next studio release, with it scheduled to hit cinemas on 10 April.

However, on Monday, Universal Pictures representatives announced that they would be making the movie available on home entertainment and in cinemas on the same day.

In addition, they are also going to make films still showing in cinemas, such as horrors The Hunt, The Invisible Man, and period drama Emma, available on-demand from Friday.

“That’s right folks – due to…um…things happening in the world, we are releasing @TheInvisibleMan for streaming this Friday,” tweeted Leigh Whannell, the director of The Invisible Man. “So those who wanted to catch it in theatres but couldn’t will be able to view it from the safety of their biohazard containment zones (couch or bed).”

The films will be available for a 48-hour rental period at a suggested price of $19.99 (£16) each in the U.S. and for similar prices internationally.

The decision is a huge blow to cinemas, which have been forced to close or reduce seating in some areas due to new social distancing rules implemented to help halt the spread of Covid-19. The news follows a difficult box office weekend, with the North American box office plummeting to a two-decade low.

As a result, Warner Bros. executives have decided to make Birds of Prey, starring Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn, available for digital purchase early, on 24 March. Disney bosses also made Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker available for digital purchase almost a week early and put Frozen II on their streaming service, Disney+, three months earlier than expected.

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Leigh Whannell worked hard to scare audiences with The Invisible Man

Director Leigh Whannell had to make The Invisible Man more mysterious because modern audiences are “harder to scare”.The 43-year-old Australian filmmaker, who also wrote the adaptation of H.G. Wells’ 1897 classic novel, chose to centre his film on do…

Director Leigh Whannell had to make The Invisible Man more mysterious because modern audiences are “harder to scare”.

The 43-year-old Australian filmmaker, who also wrote the adaptation of H.G. Wells’ 1897 classic novel, chose to centre his film on domestic abuse in an effort to terrify modern cinemagoers.

The original science fiction novel followed the story of Griffin, a reclusive scientist who has devoted himself to inventing a way to become invisible, while Whannell’s movie focuses on the perspective of Cecilia Kass, played by Elisabeth Moss, who tries to escape her abusive boyfriend, wealthy scientist Adrian Griffin.

And when asked why he centred the story on the victim of the Invisible Man, the writer and director said he wanted to avoid concentrating on the same themes that Wells did in his novel.

“I just felt like the original novel was more of a character study. It was about how this person’s experiment on themselves drove them to madness, which is really interesting,” he told Yahoo.

“I think there was a lot psychologically that Wells could’ve gone into,” Whannell added, before admitting that he restructured the movie’s themes to try and scare modern-day audiences.

“It’s hard to scare them. It’s hard to out-think them and so immediately, I thought, ‘I have to make the Invisible Man more mysterious than he’s been in the past,'” he shared.

The Invisible Man, also starring Oliver Jackson-Cohen and Storm Reid, is in cinemas now.

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Leigh Whannell prefers to create practical scare effects

The Invisible Man director Leigh Whannell prefers to use practical effects instead of computer-generated ones because he likes to be able to tell if a scare works during the shoot.The Saw co-creator’s latest project is a modern adaptation of H.G. Wells…

The Invisible Man director Leigh Whannell prefers to use practical effects instead of computer-generated ones because he likes to be able to tell if a scare works during the shoot.

The Saw co-creator’s latest project is a modern adaptation of H.G. Wells’ classic novel, which stars Elisabeth Moss as Cecilia Kass, a woman haunted by her abusive ex, who has managed to develop technology to make himself invisible.

Oliver Jackson-Cohen, who plays her ex Adrian Griffin, or his stunt double wore a green suit on set and would then be edited out in post-production, so Whannell was determined to make the scares and stunts happen so the cast and crew could react to them in the moment.

“You know what’s awesome in scary movies is doing things in camera. I would hate to be doing a scare scene in a horror movie and (then) have to wait for the end result,” he told The Hollywood Reporter. “I would hate to have someone react to a tennis ball on a C-stand and wait five months for the monster to appear… I’ll always push, push, push to do it in camera on the set so that you get it.”

The Upgrade filmmaker compared landing a scare on a horror movie set to making sure a joke works on a comedy movie and explained that doing it practically meant he could tell when he had the perfect take.

“It needs to work in the room,” the filmmaker explained. “I don’t want to put it together in editing, and I need to get it right now on the set… You can just tell by the take that goes right. So, yeah, it was all practical and in camera with a little bit of CGI help at the end.”

The Invisible Man is cinemas now.

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Elisabeth Moss helped edit The Invisible Man script to ensure female perspective

Elisabeth Moss carefully read over Leigh Whannell’s The Invisible Man script to ensure it did right by the female point of view.The Handmaid’s Tale star appears in the upcoming movie as Cecilia Kass, who manages to escape an abusive relationship but so…

Elisabeth Moss carefully read over Leigh Whannell’s The Invisible Man script to ensure it did right by the female point of view.

The Handmaid’s Tale star appears in the upcoming movie as Cecilia Kass, who manages to escape an abusive relationship but soon finds herself being stalked by her ex, who has found a way to make himself invisible.

Speaking to Esquire magazine, Moss revealed the Saw filmmaker asked her to look over his screenplay, which is based on a novel by H. G. Wells, to make sure what he wrote felt accurate from a woman’s perspective.

“I mean, this was written by a man. He wrote it brilliantly. It’s a beautiful script and what’s on the screen is very, very close to what he wrote. But he also had the intelligence to ask me, as soon as I was cast: ‘Can you please tell me what I did wrong here? What did I miss? You’re a woman, you’re coming at this from a completely different perspective. What can I put in here that will be true to being a female?'” she recalled.

“Most men that I’ve dealt with, and worked with, have that frame of mind. So, I think that is important, and I think that most smart men know that. But there are some dummies out there.”

Moss

She also revealed that Whannell spoke to victims of domestic abuse to help inform his script.

“Leigh had already spoken to victims of abuse, so he shared what he had learned with me. And I’ve done my own research over the years, especially with Handmaid’s Tale. So, I’ve been, unfortunately, looking at it for a while,” the 37-year-old explained.

The Invisible Man hits cinemas from Friday.

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Elizabeth Banks to direct and star in Invisible Woman

Elizabeth Banks has signed on to direct and star in Invisible Woman. The actress and moviemaker is following up Charlie’s Angels, her recent directorial effort, by directing, starring and producing Invisible Woman, which is based on her own original p…

Elizabeth Banks has signed on to direct and star in Invisible Woman.

The actress and moviemaker is following up Charlie’s Angels, her recent directorial effort, by directing, starring and producing Invisible Woman, which is based on her own original pitch to executives at Universal Pictures, according to Deadline.

Banks will produce alongside her husband Max Handelman for their Brownstone Productions banner from a script written by The Girl on the Train’s Erin Cressida Wilson. She will also reportedly play the character who turns invisible.

The project is completely different and separate from the upcoming psychological horror The Invisible Man, which stars Elisabeth Moss as a widow of an abusive husband who fears he might still be around. That film, directed by Leigh Whannell, is set for release in February.

Universal was known for its monster movies between the 1920s and 1950s, with films such as Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, and Creature from the Black Lagoon.

Studio executives hoped to reboot these films and create a shared universe similar to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but they abandoned that idea after 2017’s The Mummy was a box office failure. They subsequently decided to focus on individual, original monster stories that have less connection between films.

As such, Last Christmas’ Paul Feig is writing and directing a monster movie titled Dark Army from his own pitch and Rocketman’s Dexter Fletcher is helming Renfield, a new take on Dracula’s henchman.

Banks made her directorial debut with Pitch Perfect 2 in 2015 and followed it up with the recent Charlie’s Angels, starring Kristen Stewart, Ella Balinska and Naomi Scott. She is also attached to direct TV movie The Greater Good.

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Johnny Depp disappears from The Invisible Man reboot – report

Johnny Depp is reportedly no longer attached to appear in the planned reboot of The Invisible Man. The Pirates of the Caribbean star initially boarded the Universal Studios project in 2016, signing on to revamp H.G. Wells’ classic tale of a chemist wh…

Johnny Depp is reportedly no longer attached to appear in the planned reboot of The Invisible Man.

The Pirates of the Caribbean star initially boarded the Universal Studios project in 2016, signing on to revamp H.G. Wells’ classic tale of a chemist who embarks on a killing spree after using a dangerous drug that renders him invisible, but it appears Depp has since stepped down from the role of the crazed leading man, according to Variety.

The news emerges as studio officials reveal they have tapped Insidious: Chapter 3 director Leigh Whannell to take charge of the monster remake, reuniting him with Blumhouse Productions boss Jason Blum, who also produced the filmmaker’s 2015 supernatural hit and 2018 thriller Upgrade.

“Throughout cinematic history, Universal’s classic monsters have been reinvented through the prism of each new filmmaker who brought these characters to life,” said Peter Cramer, Universal’s president of production. “We are excited to take a more individualised approach for their return to screen, shepherded by creators who have stories they are passionate to tell with them.”

Wells’ novel has been adapted for the screen numerous times since it was published in 1897, with the most famous film version released in 1933, starring Claude Rains as The Invisible Man.

The reboot is intended to be part of the studio’s monster movies revamp series, which began with the 2017 release of The Mummy, featuring Tom Cruise as Nick Morton and Russell Crowe as Dr. Henry Jekyll.

However, the big-budget blockbuster fell flat with critics and was considered a box office bomb after projected losses were reported to be up to $95 million (£72 million), despite grossing $410 million (£312 million) worldwide.

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