Dries Van Noten leads call for major changes to fashion calendar

Dries Van Noten is proposing major changes to the fashion calendar amid the coronavirus crisis.The Covid-19 pandemic has hit the clothing industry hard, with factories and stores being forced to temporarily close across the world. However, Van Noten is…

Dries Van Noten is proposing major changes to the fashion calendar amid the coronavirus crisis.

The Covid-19 pandemic has hit the clothing industry hard, with factories and stores being forced to temporarily close across the world.

However, Van Noten is adamant that now might be the time to try and rethink the traditional seasonal fashion calendar.

“When you try to explain how fashion works to people not in fashion, it’s impossible. Nobody can understand it,” the 62-year-old told The New York Times, before noting that he anticipates disruptions to the upcoming drops anyway. “We know fall will deliver late… And we are going to put that on sale in November? Wouldn’t it better to wait until the new year? And then to have the courage to keep the rhythm we establish now?”

Accordingly, Van Noten is spearheading a campaign to better streamline the business, with a group of other designers and global retail bosses also showing their support for the idea.

Members of the group published an open letter on Tuesday in which they insisted the current environment provides the opportunity for a “fundamental and welcome change that will simplify our businesses, making them more environmentally and socially sustainable and ultimately align them more closely with customers’ needs.”

Primarily, they want to put the fall/winter season back to winter (August/January) and spring/summer season back in summer (February/July), create a more balanced flow of deliveries, and discount only at the end of the season.

“Working together, we hope these steps will allow our industry to become more responsible for our impact on our customers, on the planet and on the fashion community, and bring back the magic and creativity that has made fashion such an important part of our world,” they added.

Current signatories include Joseph Altuzarra, Craig Green, Erdem Moralioglu, Marine Serre, Mary Katrantzou, Pierre Hardy, Tory Burch, as well as Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez of Proenza Schouler.

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Jodie Comer has ‘given up’ wearing cosmetics during coronavirus pandemic

Jodie Comer has “given up” wearing cosmetics while in self-isolation during the Covid-19 pandemic.The Killing Eve star is currently holed up at her parents’ house in Liverpool, England, after filming on her movie The Last Duel, starring Adam Driver and…

Jodie Comer has “given up” wearing cosmetics while in self-isolation during the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Killing Eve star is currently holed up at her parents’ house in Liverpool, England, after filming on her movie The Last Duel, starring Adam Driver and Matt Damon, was shut down due to the global coronavirus outbreak.

In a new interview with The New York Times, Jodie confessed that while she’s still sticking to a strict skincare regime, she’s ditched the make-up while practicing social distancing.

“Right now, I’ve just given up. I haven’t worn make-up for the past couple of weeks,” the 27-year-old laughed, adding that she’s gone bare-faced for group chats on Zoom. “When I’m on sets, they’re constantly reapplying make-up. It’s kind of nice to let my skin breathe. That’s my excuse at least!”

The British star also discussed her skincare regime, revealing that she’s come a long way since using baby wipes on her face to remove her make-up.

“When I was in high school, I literally used to baby wipe my face. I’m mortified to admit this,” she explained, adding that while she’s been blessed with good skin, the lockdown is playing havoc with her complexion.

“I’ve always had kind of good skin – I’m really lucky. Now, it’s like, ‘Whoa!’ I know, I know, I’m trying to not be a drama queen,” she quipped. “Being indoors so much more probably doesn’t help and disturbs everything a bit. I think there’s something to letting the sun be on skin.”

Jodie is a brand ambassador for Noble Panacea, and has been using their eye cream, serum, and moisturiser to keep her oily combination skin under control.

“The moisturiser has such a gorgeous consistency. It feels like there’s a thin layer that continues to moisturise all day,” she gushed. “I try to exfoliate once a week. I use the Clarisonic tool with the different brushes. I usually do that on Sunday.”

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Victoria’s Secret boss to step down as part of major brand shake-up

Victoria’s Secret boss Leslie Wexner is to step down from his role at the brand as part of a major overhaul.The U.S. lingerie label has taken a hit in recent years, with critics calling out executives for failing to promote inclusivity and diversity in…

Victoria’s Secret boss Leslie Wexner is to step down from his role at the brand as part of a major overhaul.

The U.S. lingerie label has taken a hit in recent years, with critics calling out executives for failing to promote inclusivity and diversity in the annual fashion shows.

In addition, Wexner has faced criticism relating to his friendship with disgraced former financial manager, Jeffrey Epstein, and following an expose published in The New York Times earlier this month, former chief marketing officer Ed Razek was accused of inappropriate conduct during his 36-year stint at the company, allegations he denied.

But on Thursday, Wexner announced he would be departing his positions of chief executive officer and chairman of the board of L Brands, the parent company of Victoria’s Secret. The 82-year-old will remain a member of the board as Chairman Emeritus.

“Les Wexner is a retail legend who has built incredible brands that are household names around the globe. His leadership through this transition exemplifies his commitment to further growth of Bath & Body Works and Victoria’s Secret and driving overall shareholder value,” said Allan Tessler, lead independent board director, in a statement.

Furthermore, leaders at the company have confirmed that they have made a deal to sell a 55 per cent stake in Victoria’s Secret to a private equity fund called Sycamore Partners.

After taking into account certain liabilities, Sycamore bosses will purchase a 55 per cent interest in Victoria’s Secret for approximately $525 million (£407 million), while L Brands will retain a 45 per cent stake.

“Sycamore, which has deep experience in the retail industry and a superior track record of success, will bring a fresh perspective and greater focus to the business,” added Wexner. “We believe that, as a private company, Victoria’s Secret will be better able to focus on longer-term results. We are pleased that, by retaining a significant ownership stake, our shareholders will have the ability to meaningfully participate in the upside potential of these iconic brands.”

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Leomie Anderson praises Victoria’s Secret amid scandal

Leomie Anderson has praised bosses at Victoria’s Secret for supporting her outspoken nature even as the lingerie company battles an ongoing scandal.The British model began walking in the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show in 2015, and after making four con…

Leomie Anderson has praised bosses at Victoria’s Secret for supporting her outspoken nature even as the lingerie company battles an ongoing scandal.

The British model began walking in the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show in 2015, and after making four consecutive appearances, was promoted to Angel status last year – although the 2019 event was cancelled as part of a plan to overhaul the firm, which has been criticised for its lack of diversity and inclusivity.

However, in a new interview with Refinery29, Anderson, a champion of diversity, defended the brand and praised executives for allowing her to speak her mind on social media.

“Victoria’s Secret is a brand that I really love working with because they’ve allowed me to be myself,” she explained. “Funnily enough, a bunch of people want to talk about the lack of diversity (but) they’re a brand that has never tried to silence me or make me feel uncomfortable with the fact that I’m very vocal on issues.

“I know a lot of brands, big brands, steer clear of anybody who says anything that’s even remotely political. I know brands who are scared of girls who put #BlackLivesMatter on social media. So, the fact that Victoria’s Secret supports me in what I have to say really meant a lot to me.”

Anderson also added that there was also a practical reason why she was excited to become an Angel.

She said, “A lot of models dream of getting a contract because our job is so volatile. I want to have something stable.”

It is unclear if the model’s interview took place before or after The New York Times published an expose earlier this month.

In the piece, Ed Razek, the former chief marketing officer of Victoria’s Secret parent company, L Brands, was accused of harassment, bullying, and perpetuating a culture of misogyny. He has denied all the allegations.

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Cyndi Lauper defends Victoria’s Secret amid misogyny scandal

Cyndi Lauper has defended Victoria’s Secret as the embattled lingerie brand faces a misogyny scandal.Executives at the U.S. label, who cancelled the annual fashion show last year, are facing increasing demands to overhaul the entire company following t…

Cyndi Lauper has defended Victoria’s Secret as the embattled lingerie brand faces a misogyny scandal.

Executives at the U.S. label, who cancelled the annual fashion show last year, are facing increasing demands to overhaul the entire company following the publication of an expose by The New York Times which detailed claims of inappropriate conduct against former chief marketing officer Ed Razek.

The 71-year-old, who has denied all allegations, was accused of harassment, bullying, and perpetuating a culture of misogyny.

However, despite the scandal, pop icon Cyndi has come out to defend the lingerie firm.

The Girls Just Want to Have Fun hitmaker told WWD that Victoria’s Secret makes affordable underwear for women who “don’t have a lot of money”.

“Women who don’t have money can go into a store and buy some pretty underwear and feel good,” she added.

The brand has also come under fire for not using a diverse mix of models, with Razek also courting controversy with his comments about plus-size and transgender women before he left his role in August.

Speaking with WWD, Cyndi shared her belief that the brand doesn’t have to showcase an inclusive range of models because it’s “a show”.

“It’s not what real people look like. They have these models; they do all this stuff. It’s a show,” she explained. “You gotta give everybody a break with all of this precious s**t. Do you want to look like a Barbie doll? We all had Barbie dolls when we were little. Guess what? When I took her ponytail out, the little b***h was bald… So what am I supposed to do? I know it’s bulls**t. Nobody has a body shaped like that.”

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Model Alliance demands Victoria’s Secret addresses ‘culture of misogyny’

Members of the Model Alliance have demanded Victoria’s Secret bosses overhaul the entire company following allegations of misogyny.In an expose published in The New York Times over the weekend, models and employees accused former chief marketing office…

Members of the Model Alliance have demanded Victoria’s Secret bosses overhaul the entire company following allegations of misogyny.

In an expose published in The New York Times over the weekend, models and employees accused former chief marketing officer Ed Razek of inappropriate conduct during his 36-year stint at the U.S. lingerie label, with claims relating to harassment and bullying. The 71-year-old has denied all allegations.

In light of The New York Times report, members of the Model Alliance, a non-profit organisation that advocates for the protection of those working in the fashion industry, have sent an open letter to John Mehas, chief executive officer of Victoria’s Secret, calling for him to “take concrete action” in order to change a “culture of misogyny and abuse”.

“We believe that this moment can be a wake-up call for Victoria’s Secret. This is an opportunity to take meaningful steps towards ending these abuses by joining the RESPECT Program, as models have called for since December 2018. The RESPECT Program – a program of the Model Alliance – is the only existing accountability program designed by and for models,” the letter reads. “Models have access to an independent, confidential complaint mechanism, with swift and fair resolution of complaints and appropriate consequences for abusers. Further, RESPECT includes a robust training program aimed toward prevention, to ensure that everyone understands their rights and responsibilities.”

In addition, the letter claims officials at the Model Alliance met with leaders at Victoria’s Secret and its parent company L Brands, including chief communications officer Tammy Roberts Myers, five months ago. But in a follow-up email, Myers allegedly commented that “Victoria’s Secret was not ready to take any concrete steps towards addressing these allegations” and that the company is simply, “In the process of continued learning and listening.”

“The time for listening is long past; it’s time for Victoria’s Secret to take action to protect the people they profit from. Human rights violations can’t be stopped with a corporate rebranding exercise,” the letter concluded.

The document was signed by models including Amber Valletta, Christy Turlington, Robyn Lawley, and Karen Elson, as well as photography duo Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin.

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Karen Elson demands industry overhaul following misogyny claims at Victoria’s Secret

Karen Elson has called for changes to be made in the fashion industry following allegations of misogyny at Victoria’s Secret.In a blistering expose published in The New York Times over the weekend, former boss Ed Razek was accused of inappropriate cond…

Karen Elson has called for changes to be made in the fashion industry following allegations of misogyny at Victoria’s Secret.

In a blistering expose published in The New York Times over the weekend, former boss Ed Razek was accused of inappropriate conduct during his 36-year stint at the U.S. lingerie company.

The 71-year-old, who stepped down last year from his role as chief marketing officer of Victoria’s Secret’s parent company, L Brands, was accused of harassment, bullying, and perpetuating a culture of misogyny, and accordingly, fashion industry figures have begun speaking out over the claims.

Elson took to her Instagram Stories to share her frustration at the “industry-wide problem” and urged her fellow professionals to help her instigate change.

“Just read the @nytimes report on Victoria Secret (sic). Bullying, coercion and outrageous behaviour still regularly occur in fashion. It’s an industry-wide problem not just for models but all in the industry,” the British supermodel fired. “What’s it going to take? More scandals, exposes and lives negatively impacted or a collective coming to our senses to reform the industry for the better?

“It’s a no-brainer for me, and it’s also the decent thing to do, so we can prevent toxic work environments from going unchecked.”

Razek has denied the allegations, which also included a claim that he once made lewd comments about Bella Hadid’s breasts, and insisted elements of the expose have been “taken out of context”.

“I’ve been fortunate to work with countless, world-class models and gifted professionals and take great pride in the mutual respect we have for each other,” he stated.

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Martin Scorsese in no rush to see Joker

Martin Scorsese is in no rush to watch Joker.Last year’s comic book thriller, directed by The Hangover’s Todd Phillips and based on the origin story of the iconic DC Comics villain, followed Joaquin Phoenix’s failed comedian Arthur Fleck as he descende…

Martin Scorsese is in no rush to watch Joker.

Last year’s comic book thriller, directed by The Hangover’s Todd Phillips and based on the origin story of the iconic DC Comics villain, followed Joaquin Phoenix’s failed comedian Arthur Fleck as he descended into madness and chaos and eventually became Batman’s criminal nemesis.

Phillips revealed in several interviews that Joker was heavily inspired by the Oscar-winning filmmaker’s movies Taxi Driver from 1976 and The King of Comedy from 1982.

However, when asked if he’d seen the critically-acclaimed movie, Scorsese said he was in no hurry to check it out.

“I saw clips of it. I know it. So it’s like, why do I need to? I get it. It’s fine,” the 77-year-old told The New York Times.

He also acknowledged that Joker contained many homages to his own work, and revealed he had passed on an offer from Phillips to become involved, though his longtime collaborator Emma Tillinger Koskoff served as producer on the movie instead.

Scorsese previously discussed turning down the opportunity to direct Joker in an interview with the BBC last year, and said it was due to “personal reasons” that he decided to step away from the comic book project.

“I thought about it a lot over the last four years and decided I did not have the time for it,” he explained. “It was personal reasons why I didn’t get involved, but I know the script very well. It has a real energy and (in) Joaquin, you have remarkable work.”

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Martin Scorsese defends criticism of Marvel movies

Martin Scorsese has elaborated on his criticism of the Marvel movies in an opinion piece for The New York Times.The Irishman director, 76, sparked a huge backlash by calling the movies “not cinema” in an interview with Britain’s Empire magazine.Scorses…

Martin Scorsese has elaborated on his criticism of the Marvel movies in an opinion piece for The New York Times.

The Irishman director, 76, sparked a huge backlash by calling the movies “not cinema” in an interview with Britain’s Empire magazine.

Scorsese addressed the controversy in an article published in The New York Times on Monday, claiming he did not want to attack the artistry of those involved, but stating that they are not to his taste and are crowding other types of films out of cinemas.

“Many franchise films are made by people of considerable talent and artistry,” the movie legend wrote in his op-ed. “You can see it on the screen. The fact that the films themselves don’t interest me is a matter of personal taste and temperament.

“I know that if I were younger, if I’d come of age at a later time, I might have been excited by these pictures and maybe even wanted to make one myself. But I grew up when I did and I developed a sense of movies – of what they were and what they could be – that was as far from the Marvel universe as we on Earth are from Alpha Centauri.”

The director went on to describe his love of Alfred Hitchcock’s films and compared their spectacular set-pieces to current comic book blockbusters.

However, he also stated that modern blockbuster franchises are “market-researched, audience-tested, vetted, modified, revetted and remodified until they’re ready for consumption” – unlike those of auteur directors like Spike Lee, Kathryn Bigelow, or Paul Thomas Anderson.

Defending his decision to criticise Marvel, the famed director explained that even iconic auteurs like himself were struggling to get their films into cinemas – as he’d had to turn to Netflix to make his new gangster epic The Irishman.

“We have a theatrical window, which is great,” he complains. “Would I like the picture to play on more big screens for longer periods of time? Of course I would. But no matter whom you make your movie with, the fact is that the screens in most multiplexes are crowded with franchise pictures.”

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Dolly Parton always sleeps with her make-up on

Dolly Parton always sleeps with her make-up on in case of an emergency during the night.The Hollywood superstar is never seen in public without her signature blonde locks perfectly coiffed and a full face of cosmetics. However, Dolly has now shared tha…

Dolly Parton always sleeps with her make-up on in case of an emergency during the night.

The Hollywood superstar is never seen in public without her signature blonde locks perfectly coiffed and a full face of cosmetics. However, Dolly has now shared that she goes to bed with her make-up on, especially when travelling out of town.

“I clean my face in the mornings,” she commented in an interview with The New York Times. “You never know if you’re going to wreck the bus, you never know if you’re going to be somewhere in a hotel and there’s going to be a fire. So, I leave my make-up on at night and clean my face in the morning.”

In the chat, Dolly also discussed the new Wildwood Grove extension of her Dollywood theme park in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.

But the Jolene singer has yet to go on any of the rides, mostly because she’s worried about messing up her hair or outfit.

“I don’t ride the rides. I never have. I have a tendency to get motion sickness. Also, I’m a little bit chicken. With all my hair I got so much to lose, like my wig or my shoes. I don’t like to get messed up. I’m gonna have some handsome man mess it up, I don’t want some ride doing it,” the 73-year-old laughed.

While most dermatologists agree it is best for skin health to remove all make-up before hitting the hay, Dolly isn’t the only celebrity to follow in her footsteps.

Last year, Kim Kardashian confessed in a discussion with Busy Philipps that she regular sleeps with full glam.

“Oh, all the time,” the reality star said. “Like even if I can’t have glam the next day, I’ll sleep perfectly and maybe I’ll redo my skin, but I try to salvage it for two days.”

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