Jodie Foster to direct Mona Lisa theft movie

Jodie Foster is set to direct a film about the 1911 theft of Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa.The project will be based on Seymour Reit’s 1981 book The Day They Stole the Mona Lisa, which delves into how Vincenzo Peruggia, an employee of the Louvre museum…

Jodie Foster is set to direct a film about the 1911 theft of Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa.

The project will be based on Seymour Reit’s 1981 book The Day They Stole the Mona Lisa, which delves into how Vincenzo Peruggia, an employee of the Louvre museum in Paris, had managed to steal the portrait and walk out with it hidden under his coat.

Confirming the news to Deadline at the Sundance Film Festival in Utah, producer Jeffrey Soros noted that he expects the film to be a thrilling drama.

“This happened in 1911, and it was the thing that made the Mona Lisa so famous… We have got a whole new script for Jodie Foster to direct,” he told the publication. “This is in the mould of (classic movie) The Thomas Crown Affair… It is a fun story, and the crime itself is not sophisticated. Our story mixes truth and fiction, and the focus is on the characters behind orchestrating the theft.”

An Italian patriot, Peruggia believed the famous painting should be exhibited in Italy, and ultimately kept it in his apartment for two years before being caught trying to sell it to an art dealer in Florence. The Mona Lisa was returned to the Louvre in 1914, with Peruggia serving six months in prison over the crime.

Screenwriter Bill Wheeler, known for his work on films like Queen of Katwe, Ghost in the Shell, and The Lego Ninjago movie, will pen the script.

Meanwhile, the film marks Foster’s next major directing gig, with the Oscar-winning actress previously having helmed 1991’s Little Man Tate, 1995’s Home for the Holidays, 2011’s The Beaver, and 2016’s Money Monster.

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A Clockwork Orange title designer Pablo Ferro dies aged 83

Pablo Ferro, famed for his iconic title design work on movies such as A Clockwork Orange and Bullitt, has died at the age of 83.The Cuban-American award-winning designer died of complications from pneumonia on Friday (15Nov18) in Sedona, Arizona, his f…

Pablo Ferro, famed for his iconic title design work on movies such as A Clockwork Orange and Bullitt, has died at the age of 83.

The Cuban-American award-winning designer died of complications from pneumonia on Friday (15Nov18) in Sedona, Arizona, his family confirmed, according to editors at The Hollywood Reporter.

Ferro, a self-taught artist whose signature style incorporated montage-like title sequences, creative stylistic typefaces, and quick-cut editing, worked on over 100 films including Stanley Kubrick classics A Clockwork Orange and Dr. Strangelove, Steve McQueen’s Bullitt, Men In Black, and The Thomas Crown Affair (1968), and served as a supervising editor on the music video for Michael Jackson’s 1983 hit Beat It.

Ferro, who was raised on his grandfather’s farm in Cuba, moved to New York City with his family when he was 12. He began his career in design in the mid-’50s, working with Disney animator Vladimir ‘Bill’ Tytla, who became his mentor.

He was also a contemporary of late Marvel founder Stan Lee, working with him early in his career on a series of sci-fi and adventure comics.

In the ’60s he and fellow artists Fred Mogubgub and Lew Schwartz launched their own company, creating visuals for advertising campaigns, before he got the call from Kubrick which kick-started his career in Hollywood.

Ferro’s work in title design has appeared in a dozen Academy Award-winning movies including Philadelphia and Good Will Hunting, and has also won him numerous Clio awards for creative excellence in advertising, design and communication, and a DGA Excellence in Film Award.

He later went on to create Pablo Ferro Films, served as a creative consultant on Hal Ashby’s 1983 Rolling Stones concert film Let’s Spend the Night Together and directed his own 1992 feature Me Myself and I, starring George Segal and JoBeth Williams.

The designer is survived by his former wife, Susan, as well as his children Joy Ferro-Moore and Allen Ferro.

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Toni Garrn tapped to front Hugo Boss’ heritage-inspired collection

Hugo Boss has tapped Toni Garrn to front a new capsule collection inspired by the brand’s heritage.The luxury label has designed a new line called Boss ‘Made in Germany’, a 12-piece capsule for men and women all envisioned and manufactured in the natio…

Hugo Boss has tapped Toni Garrn to front a new capsule collection inspired by the brand’s heritage.

The luxury label has designed a new line called Boss ‘Made in Germany’, a 12-piece capsule for men and women all envisioned and manufactured in the nation.

Chief brand officer Ingo Wilts told WWD that the brand was “proud to be the biggest premium fashion-maker in Germany” and wished to celebrate its origins in the latest limited-edition project.

The collection has been based on Hugo Boss’ signature tailoring and used exclusively developed Italian fabrics to reinvigorate six pieces for men and six for women.

Men’s garments include a checked double-breasted coat, a twill suit, a crewneck sweater and an embossed leather bomber jacket, while women are able to purchase items such as a checked pencil dress, a wool mohair mixed rollneck pullover and a silk bow blouse.

“We also know that whenever we go outside Germany, in France or Asia, for example, they really appreciate (articles) made in Germany,” Wilts added.

He also explained that the collection took some inspiration from the characters played by Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway in the 1968 heist movie The Thomas Crown Affair, but insisted that the pieces “fit perfectly well into (the brand’s) overall colour range and sports tailoring direction this season.”

The Made in Germany capsule is hitting select Boss stores worldwide and will go live online from 1 October (18), while being supported by a campaign featuring Garrn as well as Spanish-German actor Daniel Bruhl.

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