Adut Akech: ‘Talking is the medicine for anxiety and depression’

Adut Akech finds it difficult to open up about her feelings even though it helps her cope with depression and anxiety.The 19-year-old model, who was born in South Sudan, revealed her battle with the mental health issues in January in a candid New Year …

Adut Akech finds it difficult to open up about her feelings even though it helps her cope with depression and anxiety.

The 19-year-old model, who was born in South Sudan, revealed her battle with the mental health issues in January in a candid New Year Instagram post, in which she confessed she “would wake up every morning crying” and cry some more when she got home during 2018.

In a new interview with British newspaper The Times, she explained how she makes time for talking and writing about her feelings to help her manage.

“I suffer from anxiety and depression, and I’ve learnt that talking is the medicine. It’s a challenge for me, as I grew up keeping everything in,” she told British newspaper The Times. “Writing my feelings is a way for me to let them out, without feeling vulnerable.”

Akech spent her early years in Kakuma, one of Kenya’s largest refugee camps, before moving to Australia at the age of six with her mother and siblings. She’s now writing a book to document her experiences and eventually wants to return to South Sudan to open a hospital and school and start a modelling agency representing South Sudanese women.

“I’ve never really spoken about my story, not because I was ashamed of it, but because no one really asked,” she explained. “Now I see the impact that I’m having and the type of inspiration I can give to someone. I’m not just Adut the model, I am more than that. I am the little girl who was once in a refugee camp with no food, and I made my way out of that – that is what my story is.”

The catwalk regular, who is the face of Valentino’s new fragrance Born in Roma, was honoured with the Model of the Year accolade at The Fashion Awards earlier in December, and she called the prize “equivalent to an Oscar”.

© Cover Media

Gigi Hadid keen to break into Hollywood with acting role

Gigi Hadid is keen to give acting a try but is waiting for the right role to come her way.The model is one of the most in-demand names in the fashion industry at present, having landed campaigns for the likes of Max Mara, Stuart Weitzman, Fendi and Mos…

Gigi Hadid is keen to give acting a try but is waiting for the right role to come her way.

The model is one of the most in-demand names in the fashion industry at present, having landed campaigns for the likes of Max Mara, Stuart Weitzman, Fendi and Moschino, and was also unveiled as one of the stars of the 2019 Pirelli Calendar on Thursday (26Jul18).

While Gigi’s career is going from strength to strength, she has now shared that she is keen to act and gets sent scripts constantly.

“I get sent roles all the time – the model, the girlfriend,” she told The Times. “When I get something that’s the opposite of that, I’ll do it. I want to be smart and play characters that I’m really interested in. I’d rather do nothing than a random bunch of cameos.”

Gigi went on to explain that she is determined to continue expressing her personality through her projects and wants to breakdown misconceptions that she is simply a model.

In addition, she stated that while she comes from a wealthy background, having been raised in Los Angeles by her real estate mogul father Mohamed Hadid and former model mother Yolanda Hadid, she has been financially independent since becoming an adult.

“I’ve always had the guilt of privilege. It started in high school, and I was determined not to be defined by it, or by being pretty. I was a great volleyball player and I had great grades. That’s how I valued myself. It was always my parents’ money, and I was always going to get a job and live independently. I’ve paid my own bills since I was 18,” the 23-year-old insisted.

During the interview, Gigi also spoke about the less glamorous aspects of the modelling industry. The blonde star, who recently rekindled her relationship with singer Zayn Malik, admitted that she can get very lonely when travelling to modelling jobs by herself.

“Sometimes I’m around hundreds of people all day long. Then you go back to a hotel room and you’re alone in a country that you don’t know very well and in a time zone where you can’t call the people closest to you. It’s these times, when I feel alone, that I learn a lot about myself,” she added.

© Cover Media

Diane von Furstenberg deems Viagra the ‘worst thing’ for women

Diane von Furstenberg is not a fan of Viagra, calling the sex aid the “worst thing to happen to women in 15 years”.Diane has spoken to The Times about everything from her mother, who survived Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz, to financial independence…

Diane von Furstenberg is not a fan of Viagra, calling the sex aid the “worst thing to happen to women in 15 years”.

Diane has spoken to The Times about everything from her mother, who survived Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz, to financial independence. She also got fired up over the subject of the little blue pill.

“The worst thing that has happened to women in the last 15 years is Viagra,” she stated. “For men, it used to be all about getting it up. ‘Did I?’ ‘Can I?’ There was a certain fairness. A woman couldn’t have a child after 40, right? Though even that doesn’t exist anymore.

“But the man could have a child until 65, but sexually after a while … Now, with Viagra … they just feel … I think Viagra is the worst thing.”

She went on to share some of her own bedroom secrets, revealing that she and husband Barry Diller don’t actually share a boudoir as they live in separate apartments.

Talking about second husband Barry, who is the chairman and senior executive of IAC/InterActiveCorp and Expedia, Diane shared that they have an “amazing” relationship.

“I have known him for 44 years,” the 71-year-old continued. “He was my lover, then my friend, then my husband. Barry loves me to be successful. But… I have always talked about the idea of a woman in charge. So, for International Women’s Day I printed some T-shirts that said, ‘Woman in charge.’ And he doesn’t like it when I wear that T-shirt. Which is weird, because it’s not at all him.”

© Cover Media

Donatella Versace stands by sexy outfits in wake of #MeToo era

Donatella Versace is adamant that women should still wear sexy outfits in the #MeToo era.The 63-year-old is chief designer at Versace, a label renowned for its racy aesthetic popularised by celebrities such as Jennifer Lopez and Elizabeth Hurley, who h…

Donatella Versace is adamant that women should still wear sexy outfits in the #MeToo era.

The 63-year-old is chief designer at Versace, a label renowned for its racy aesthetic popularised by celebrities such as Jennifer Lopez and Elizabeth Hurley, who have worn the brand’s designs to many A-list events.

Though conversations about the sexual harassment of women are still rife in the film, music and fashion industries, Versace doesn’t believe the ongoing discussions should determine the way women dress.

“To be empowered is to look your best, to show femininity,” she insisted in an interview with The Times. “Sexy is an attitude. It doesn’t have to be about sex. It can mean, ‘Look at me, I have something to say.’ Female empowerment is not someone in a pair of jeans and no make-up. What are you supposed to do because of #MeToo, become unsexy?”

Though the fashion legend has strong opinions when it comes to style, she is open to debate and shared that the popularisation of social media definitely has had an influence on her professional decisions.

“It’s a revolution. Now you have direct contact with a younger generation. You can listen to different people from all over the world, and it makes it easier to understand that you need to change,” the platinum blonde star shared. “That’s when I began to push it a little bit. It was these conversations on the Internet which changed what I was doing completely. The Internet is an instrument that lets you be in tune.”

During the interview, Versace spoke about her late brother Gianni Versace, who was tragically murdered in 1997. Like her, the designer also had powerful ideas about the best way to dress, but his sister was never afraid to tell him the truth.

“No one else had the courage (to say no to him),” she smiled. “I would say, ‘This is wrong. Let’s do it again.'”

© Cover Media

Stella McCartney suffered panic attacks as Chloe head

Stella McCartney struggled with panic attacks when she worked as Chloe’s creative director in the ’90s.The British designer was recruited by the French fashion house in 1997, where she took over the role from Karl Lagerfeld. Stella has now revealed tha…

Stella McCartney struggled with panic attacks when she worked as Chloe’s creative director in the ’90s.

The British designer was recruited by the French fashion house in 1997, where she took over the role from Karl Lagerfeld.

Stella has now revealed that she suffered panic attacks shortly after she accepted the position, as her groundbreaking new job coincided with the death of her mother Linda McCartney, who died from breast cancer in April 1998.

“I had quite a reaction that I didn’t feel in control of,” the 46-year-old recalled in an interview with The Times. “I possibly suppressed my emotions and I started having panic attacks, physical reactions to that loss. I haven’t massively talked about (this). It’s like a dirty word saying you have a panic attack for some reason.”

Stella, who is the daughter of Beatles legend Paul McCartney, received a hostile reception from Lagerfeld when he discovered that she was taking over his position, and he slammed her credentials as a designer.

However, she was hugely successful at the label and managed to multiply the brand’s sales by five times during her four-year tenure.

The mother-of-four went on to say that she was able to manage her “severe” panic attacks by learning transcendental meditation, and proudly explained that the attacks have since subsided.

Paul popularised transcendental meditation along with the rest of the Beatles during the late 1960s, and though his daughter was aware of the method, Stella didn’t decide to engage with the practise until her mother’s death.

“I mean, please! I was drinking alcohol and partying. It wouldn’t have come into my mind to meditate unless something quite dramatic (had happened),” she admitted.

Her husband Alasdhair Willis also meditates, and Stella offers a programme to the employees at her own fashion house.

© Cover Media