Edward Norton didn’t want to ruin friendship with Thom Yorke over Motherless Brooklyn score

Edward Norton dropped plans to get Thom Yorke to score his new movie Motherless Brooklyn as he feared it would wreck their friendship.The Fight Club actor originally wanted the Radiohead frontman to pen around 75 minutes of jazz music for the period dr…

Edward Norton dropped plans to get Thom Yorke to score his new movie Motherless Brooklyn as he feared it would wreck their friendship.

The Fight Club actor originally wanted the Radiohead frontman to pen around 75 minutes of jazz music for the period drama, which he directs and stars in, but instead turned to Wynton Marsalis, a legend of the genre, to write most of the film’s music, with Yorke contributing one track, Daily Battles.

Speaking to The Guardian, the actor revealed that they decided not to work together as the musician felt a little upset with the use of his score in Luca Guadagnino’s 2018 horror Suspiria and he didn’t want a similar situation to ruin their friendship.

“Not to say that we don’t love Luca,” Norton said. “But Thom came off Suspiria feeling so burned.”

Explaining their decision to limit their collaboration to one song, he added: “The last thing you want with somebody you know is to get into a bloody situation. That’s the nightmare of all nightmares.”

Before turning to Marsalis, Norton considered Yorke’s Radiohead bandmate Jonny Greenwood but he learned from the guitarist and composer’s longtime collaborator Paul Thomas Anderson that Greenwood’s working style would not have gelled well with his.

“(Anderson) said: ‘If you expect any iterative back-and-forth flow with Jonny, this is a mirage. He just sends me what he’s got and says: ‘Good luck to you’…And, well, no. That wouldn’t work for me,” the 50-year-old recalled.

Norton and Yorke nearly worked together on the same movie two decades ago – as the No Surprises hitmaker was offered the chance to score Fight Club. However, he turned the opportunity, with the musician explaining, “Got the email. Got the script. And I was just too f**ked up in the head to do it.”

Motherless Brooklyn debuted in cinemas earlier this month.

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Emma Roberts joins host of actors in Rag & Bone’s new campaign

Emma Roberts is one of the many film stars tapped to feature in Rag & Bone’s latest campaign.The actress stars in the brand’s autumn/winter 2018 campaign film alongside Kate Mara, Jon Hamm, Boyd Holbrook, Lakeith Stanfield, Lake Bell and Pom Klementief…

Emma Roberts is one of the many film stars tapped to feature in Rag & Bone’s latest campaign.

The actress stars in the brand’s autumn/winter 2018 campaign film alongside Kate Mara, Jon Hamm, Boyd Holbrook, Lakeith Stanfield, Lake Bell and Pom Klementieff, as well as director Reed Morano.

Footage was shot in Los Angeles and New York over the course of six weeks by The Killing of a Sacred Deer cinematographer Thimios Bakatakis, and features music from Radiohead singer/songwriter Thom Yorke.

The Time of Day series aims to tap into the notion that people are more connected to one another than they may think, and consists of eight short films woven together to explore the homogeneous situations strangers can find themselves in. All of the features are subtly interconnected by recurring props and locations.

Many photos from the campaign have been shot in black-and-white, but an image shared through Rag & Bone’s social media accounts show Scream Queens star Emma posing in a colourful image wearing a loose green leopard print dress. The pink and blue background is blurred behind her, and she poses with one hand on top of her head and sticks her tongue out as she cheekily winks at the camera.

Another snap, obtained by Dazed, shows Emma poking her tongue out once again, but this time wearing a pair of checked trousers, with only a blazer covering her top half.

The fashion brand has a history of recruiting showbiz’s hottest stars to feature in its campaigns, with Wiz Khalifa and Ashley Graham previously tapped.

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Thom Yorke: ‘Composing Suspiria score was like making spells’

Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke has likened his first attempt at scoring new horror movie Suspiria to “making spells”. The British rocker attended the movie’s premiere at the Venice Film Festival in Italy over the weekend (01-02Sep18), and at a press co…

Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke has likened his first attempt at scoring new horror movie Suspiria to “making spells”.

The British rocker attended the movie’s premiere at the Venice Film Festival in Italy over the weekend (01-02Sep18), and at a press conference for the project, he admitted the task really put his skills as a musician to the test.

“There’s a way of repeating in music which can hypnotise, and I kept thinking to myself it was a form of making spells,” he explained. “So when I was working in my studio, I was making spells – and that sounds really stupid but that’s how I was thinking about it.”

The job pulled Thom out of his comfort zone, but he enjoyed being given the creative freedom to try new things.

“It was a sort of freedom I’d not had before: I’m not working in the format of a song or arrangement, I’m just exploring,” he said. “I’m putting things out into my studio and seeing what my studio is bringing back.”

Yorke was brought onboard by director Luca Guadagnino last spring (May17) to write original music for his remake of Dario Argento’s 1977 horror classic, and at the time, he confessed the gig was truly “terrifying” because he never learned to read music.

However, he was thankful for the support he had been receiving from Luca and his editor Walter Fasano.

“Normally for a horror movie it involves orchestras, it involves these specific things,” he told BBC 6 Music radio, “but Luca, the director, and Walter, the editor, are very much like, ‘Find your own path with it,’ and they’re giving me as much freedom as they can, which is great, because as they know I’ve never done it before.”

Thom could also have turned to his bandmate Jonny Greenwood for advice – the lead guitarist has scored a number of films to date, including There Will Be Blood and We Need to Talk About Kevin.

© Cover Media