Steven Kolb ‘asks designers not to cast models under 18 for NYFW’

Steven Kolb has reportedly urged big-name fashion houses to avoid using models under the age of 18 at the upcoming New York Fashion Week.Kolb, the head of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA), has sent an email round, according to Page Si…

Steven Kolb has reportedly urged big-name fashion houses to avoid using models under the age of 18 at the upcoming New York Fashion Week.

Kolb, the head of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA), has sent an email round, according to Page Six, ahead of the biannual fashion event, which kicks off on 8 February (19).

“As you cast your New York Fashion Week shows, please remember to promote diversity and inclusion, on and off the runway,” he wrote. “American fashion can lead the path. Additionally, we strongly encourage you to support the well-being of younger individuals by not hiring models under the age of 18 for runway shows, and to create areas backstage for models to change in privacy.”

He made a similar call last year, but it fell on deaf ears with a lot of the top labels.

Model of the moment Kaia Gerber, who is a regular on the runway in Paris and Milan, and Thylane Blondeau, who was recently named most beautiful face of 2018, are both yet to reach the milestone birthday.

Kaia is also one of Marc Jacobs’ go-to models, walking in his New York Fashion Week Spring/ Summer 19 show in September. And, despite only just turning 17, she also appeared in Calvin Klein, Coach and Anna Sui’s shows that season.

The news comes after Vogue, in partnership with the CFDA, vowed not to use models under 18.

“Young models are still developing,” Kolb said last August. “There can be a lack of the confidence, strength, experience, and maturity it takes to deal with the pressures of this work. The CFDA supports the recommendation of raising the minimum age – we want young models to have the time to come into their own so they feel safe and in charge in the workplace.”

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Thylane Blondeau tops 100 Most Beautiful Faces of 2018 list

Thylane Blondeau has topped the list of 100 Most Beautiful Faces for 2018.The French model, who is the daughter of footballer Patrick Blondeau and TV presenter Veronika Loubry, shot to fame in 2007 when she was hailed as the “most beautiful girl in the…

Thylane Blondeau has topped the list of 100 Most Beautiful Faces for 2018.

The French model, who is the daughter of footballer Patrick Blondeau and TV presenter Veronika Loubry, shot to fame in 2007 when she was hailed as the “most beautiful girl in the world”.

Since then, Thylane has gone on to land gigs for the likes of L’Oreal Paris and Tommy Hilfiger, and she has now come in at first place on film critic TC Candler’s annual list.

“I just can’t believe it myself …thanks so much @tccandler and everyone who voted… I never thought I was once number one!! I’m thankful to all of you,” the 17-year-old posted on Instagram alongside a picture of herself. “I really hope your (sic) having great holidays and spend (a) nice Christmas with your family… all the best to all of you guys lots of love.”

Taiwanese singer Chou Tzu-yu came in second place, while Israeli model Yael Shelbia nabbed third.

Other celebrities to be included were models Taylor Hill and Jourdan Dunn, and actresses such as Emma Watson, Camilla Belle, and Lupita Nyong’o.

Meanwhile, Aquaman star Jason Momoa was crowned the Most Handsome Face 2018, beating out South Korean singer Jungkook and Luther actor Idris Elba.

The 100 Most Beautiful Faces list has been published annually by TC Candler and a group known as The Independent Critics since 1990.

The organisation claims that unlike most other annual beauty rankings, their selections are not about the “sexiest body or the most famous celebrity” but rather about celebrating the “modern ideal of worldwide beauty”.

Previous winners have included Michelle Pfeiffer, Isabelle Huppert, Nicole Kidman, Jennifer Connelly, Lindsay Lohan, Keira Knightley, and Kate Beckinsale.

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CFDA officials lead call to action over young models

Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) executives have reaffirmed their commitment to no longer using models under the age of 18.Earlier in the year (18), bosses at the fashion group and at U.S. media company Conde Nast, publisher of Vogue and …

Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) executives have reaffirmed their commitment to no longer using models under the age of 18.

Earlier in the year (18), bosses at the fashion group and at U.S. media company Conde Nast, publisher of Vogue and other magazines, introduced new codes of conduct regarding photoshoots and runway shows in light of the #MeToo movement and claims of sexual misconduct in the entertainment and fashion industries.

Now, in the lead-up to New York Fashion Week in September, leaders have confirmed their commitment to protecting models.

“We believe working with age-appropriate models is paramount to their wellbeing,” CFDA officials said in a statement. “We always recommended not working with models under 16 but in light of recent revelations, we now encourage you to consider only working with models aged 18 and over.”

In addition, CFDA organisers stated that they were actively working with agents and photography studios to ensure models have private backstage changing rooms at various venues.

The guidelines mean that rising models such as Kaia Gerber, 16, and Thylane Blondeau, 17, will most likely not be able to participate. However, in a piece about the topic published on Vogue.com on Thursday (16Aug18), CFDA president and chief executive officer Steven Kolb explained that it is important that fashion organisations and magazines set a precedent.

“Young models are still developing. There can be a lack of the confidence, strength, experience, and maturity it takes to deal with the pressures of this work. The CFDA supports the recommendation of raising the minimum age – we want young models to have the time to come into their own so they feel safe and in charge in the workplace,” he said.

Other organisations have also recently introduced stricter codes, with the British Fashion Council setting up a helpline for models, and Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) and Kering releasing a charter in which the luxury conglomerates both agreed to ban very thin and underage models from the runway.

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