Twiggy doesn’t think fashion ‘will ever go away’ from using slim models

Twiggy doesn’t believe fashion industry leaders will ever stop using slim models.The 70-year-old, who was the face of the 1960s, has discussed her thoughts of the ever-changing world of fashion and the ongoing challenges faced by plus-sized models in a…

Twiggy doesn’t believe fashion industry leaders will ever stop using slim models.

The 70-year-old, who was the face of the 1960s, has discussed her thoughts of the ever-changing world of fashion and the ongoing challenges faced by plus-sized models in an interview with British newspaper The Guardian.

And when asked if the business still needs to change and focus more on women of different ages and sizes, Twiggy was candid in her reply.

“Well, it has, hasn’t it, there are so many more ads now,” she told the publication. “It’s the same with older models, they’re using middle-aged and older women in commercials.

“I don’t think the high fashion industry will ever go completely away from slimness but I think other parts of the industry have started to use different shapes and sizes, and I think they should.”

Twiggy, born Lesley Hornby, was also quizzed about her views on editing photos for ad campaigns, after her Olay eye cream advert back in 2009 was banned by the Advertising Standards Authority for being misleading because it had been airbrushed.

“That was nothing to do with me. I can’t stop people…” the model began. “I go and do a job. If they take it away and do the stuff, it’s absolutely nothing to do with me.”

When pushed further on the subject, Twiggy was asked her opinion on the body image movements led by women on social media, including actress Jameela Jamil, who outwardly criticise the use of photo-editing in ad campaigns.

“I have no idea, it’s up to them. I don’t have any control over that. I think we should get off this subject because you’re getting really boring,” she fired.

© Cover Media

Twiggy to serve as judge on RuPaul’s Drag Race U.K.

Twiggy will serve as a special judge on the U.K. version of reality show RuPaul’s Drag Race. The ’60s supermodel, who became a global icon thanks to her short hems, cropped hairstyle and doe-like eyes, will act as a celebrity guest judge for one episo…

Twiggy will serve as a special judge on the U.K. version of reality show RuPaul’s Drag Race.

The ’60s supermodel, who became a global icon thanks to her short hems, cropped hairstyle and doe-like eyes, will act as a celebrity guest judge for one episode of the upcoming show, alongside host RuPaul and veteran judge Michelle Visage.

The 69-year-old, who was awarded a damehood for her services to fashion, the arts and charity earlier this year, revealed in a statement that she excited to judge drag queens.

“You see the most gorgeous women in the most glamorous outfits. I love the creativity of the clothes and the make-up. I have been to a few drag shows and they’re brilliant fun,” she said.

According to a press release, the “British cultural icon” is a personal heroine of RuPaul and “her understanding of high fashion, the catwalk and her experience as a seamstress brought some dame realness to proceedings.”

British popstar Cheryl will also act as a special celebrity judge in a different episode, and she shared she was a big fan of the series.

“I have always admired the work and dedication that goes into drag and have learned over the years that it is an art form,” Cheryl said. “It is not only fun and glamorous but equally as skillful and admirable, I find it incredibly inspiring. I just love the make-up, creativity and the drama. I am honoured to be a guest judge!”

Twiggy and Cheryl join previously announced guest judges Game of Thrones star Maisie Williams, Spice Girl Geri Horner, Little Mix’s Jade Thirlwall, British actress Michaela Coel, and Hacksaw Ridge star Andrew Garfield.

Talk show hosts Graham Norton and Alan Carr will appear as rotating resident judges across the eight-part series, which will air on BBC Three in the autumn.

© Cover Media

Drew Barrymore ‘really misses’ her thin ’90s eyebrows

Drew Barrymore “really misses” the thin eyebrows she sported throughout the 1990s.The Wedding Singer actress was one of the major trendsetters in the decade, often stepping out at red carpet events in slip dresses, leather jackets, and choker necklaces…

Drew Barrymore “really misses” the thin eyebrows she sported throughout the 1990s.

The Wedding Singer actress was one of the major trendsetters in the decade, often stepping out at red carpet events in slip dresses, leather jackets, and choker necklaces.

However, Drew has now shared that the fad she liked the most at the time was the craze for over-tweezed arches.

“I really miss my thin eyebrows!” she said in an interview with Refinery29.com. “Although I’m so lucky they grew back, because I tweezed them for so many years… I also loved bleaching the c**p out of them – I had a personal stock investment in (cream bleach product) Jolen.”

Another trend Drew got onboard with in the ’90s was the use of MAC’s Spice lip liner all over her pout and then tapping on a “chalky powder” over top in order to create her own matte lipstick.

And while current beauty trends are focused on bold brows and glossy lips, the blonde star would not be surprised if some of her old favourites make a comeback in the future.

“Well, the ’90s was really just ’20s make-up redone,” the 43-year-old noted. “Everything is cyclical, we’re always honouring different decades. We’ve had the ’70s and ’90s, but I can’t wait for the ’60s to return, from Twiggy to Sharon Tate – those eyes! That hair!”

Elsewhere in the chat, Drew spoke about the new launch for her beauty brand Flower Beauty, which is now being stocked in the U.K. for the first time.

The line includes Mix N’ Matte Lipsticks and the highly sought-after Supernova Celestial Skin Elixir Primer, and the mother-of-two is particularly proud of the quality and price point of her formulas.

“I just don’t like alienating people, because I know how it makes me feel and I don’t want anyone else feeling that way,” she added of her decision to keep the range accessible.

© Cover Media