Alexander Wang teams with Uniqlo on summer basics line

Alexander Wang is partnering with Uniqlo on a collection of summer basics.The New York-based designer, known for his signature use of black fabric and edgy sportswear, previously teamed with executives at the Japanese high street retailer on a limited-…

Alexander Wang is partnering with Uniqlo on a collection of summer basics.

The New York-based designer, known for his signature use of black fabric and edgy sportswear, previously teamed with executives at the Japanese high street retailer on a limited-edition collection last October (18), with the minimalist items utilising Uniqlo’s Heattech fabric, a lightweight high-tech material which actually creates heat.

Now, Wang has announced that he is working with the designers at Uniqlo once again, but this time, he has created a range with the objective of keeping wearers cool.

“Working with Uniqlo on the second season of the collaboration, it felt like there was a mutual understanding of not only aesthetics but of each other’s work ethic,” he said in a statement. “It was easier coming together this time around to accomplish a similar goal. Innovation has always been at the forefront of our design and creative process, and functionality serves a huge purpose in the way I and our customers dress.”

The basics collection includes seamless T-shirts, bras, bodysuits, tops, camisoles and bike shorts for women and tank tops and underwear for men. Items are available in an array of neutral colours, such as light pink, light blue, grey, and black, and incorporate AIRism fabric, which a Uniqlo representative described as “comfort conditioning technology”.

Wang’s designs for Uniqlo will be priced from $10 and $30 (£7.50 – £23). They are due to hit selected stores on 11 April.

Wang is no stranger to collaborations, having first worked with Uniqlo on a ready-to-wear collection in 2008, and more recently teaming with the likes of H&M, Adidas and Adidas Originals on various projects.

Other designers who recently partnered with Uniqlo on capsule collections have included Jonathan Anderson and Tomas Maier.

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Alexander Wang teaming with Uniqlo on basics line

Alexander Wang is partnering with Uniqlo on a limited-edition line of basics. The designer, known for his signature use of black fabric and edgy sportswear, previously teamed with the Japanese high street retailer on a ready-to-wear collection in 2008…

Alexander Wang is partnering with Uniqlo on a limited-edition line of basics. 

The designer, known for his signature use of black fabric and edgy sportswear, previously teamed with the Japanese high street retailer on a ready-to-wear collection in 2008.

Following the success of that partnership, Wang is working with designers at Uniqlo once again, and has announced that he is now gearing up to unveil a range of T-shirts, bodysuits, leggings, bras, and briefs for the company.

“The thing that I love about these pieces is that they can really be worn on so many different occasions,” he told Vogue.com of the concept. “Wear the bra top with a high-waisted jean and a denim jacket.”

The garments will be available in neutral colours as well as Wang’s favourite neon green. Items utilise Uniqlo’s Heattech fabric, a lightweight high-tech material which actually creates heat.

“We thought this could be a great concept where we think about how to marry the two ideas: Heattech and underwear,” the 34-year-old explained. “Heattech is a programme created out of innovation, function, and utility. It’s something that I’ve always been very inspired by, by the advancement and innovation in fabrication.”

Wang’s designs for Uniqlo will be priced from $15 and $35 (£11- £26). They are due to hit Uniqlo stores by the end of October (18).

Other designers who recently partnered with Uniqlo on capsule collections have included Jonathan Anderson and Tomas Maier.

Wang is no stranger to collaborations, teaming up with H&M, Adidas and Adidas Originals on various items since launching his brand back in 2007.

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Jil Sander talks career beginnings as label turns 50

Jil Sander’s trailblazing fashion career was borne out of her need for a decent pair of trousers.This year (18) marks the 50th anniversary of Sander’s namesake label, which she established in her native Hamburg in 1968. Over the past five decades, the…

Jil Sander’s trailblazing fashion career was borne out of her need for a decent pair of trousers.

This year (18) marks the 50th anniversary of Sander’s namesake label, which she established in her native Hamburg in 1968.

Over the past five decades, the designer has redefined women’s fashion, opting to create modern and minimalist pieces instead of unwearable clothes.

“In the ’60s, as a woman, you couldn’t find a decent pair of trousers. In order to be taken seriously, I felt, I needed a less ornamented wardrobe,” she told star2.com of her career beginnings.

To celebrate 50 years, Sander recently put on her first-ever solo exhibition, titled Jil Sander: Present Tense, at Frankfurt’s Museum Angewandte Kunst (Museum of Applied Arts).

More than 10,000 visitors attended the retrospective, with museum director Matthias Wagner K praising the 74-year-old as “one of the most important fashion designers of her generation”.

Over her time in fashion, Sander has often been hailed as a feminist thanks to her masculine-inspired pieces and penchant for a muted palette. However, it’s not a title she ever uses herself.

“I would hesitate to call myself a feminist because my nature isn’t militant. We should work together,” she said, adding that she “never felt at a disadvantage” to male colleagues.

In 1999, the Prada Group bought a large stake in Sander’s brand, which led to the designer exiting her label soon after. She came back for a short stint in 2003 but left again the following year.

While she no longer heads up the label, she has kept busy with other projects, including designing for Uniqlo for two years from 2009.

Hinting that another collaboration may be on the cards, she teased that she still lives in her Uniqlo pieces but is “slowly getting desperate for new pieces”.

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Kim Jones enjoyed doing something ‘fun and light’ before Dior appointment

Kim Jones enjoyed creating his “fun and light” capsule for GU before joining Dior.The designer, who oversaw Louis Vuitton’s men’s ready-to-wear division from 2011 until early 2018, succeeded Kris Van Assche as Dior Homme’s artistic director on Monday (…

Kim Jones enjoyed creating his “fun and light” capsule for GU before joining Dior.

The designer, who oversaw Louis Vuitton’s men’s ready-to-wear division from 2011 until early 2018, succeeded Kris Van Assche as Dior Homme’s artistic director on Monday (19Mar18). Prior to landing the prestigious job, Jones created a capsule collection for GU, the sister brand of Uniqlo, and shared that the project was an ideal warm up before getting down to business at the French luxury label.

“(I was) having a gap between two jobs, so I thought it was nice to do something that was just sort of fun and light, easy,” he said in an interview with WWD. “I really just like that fact that it’s young people interested in fashion. There’s an element of the street in what I did for my (eponymous brand). It was quite advanced for its time, so it’s nice showing people what it’s like now.”

Jones’ own line disbanded ten years ago, but the 44-year-old used his collaboration with GU to reissue some of his brand’s favourite pieces after being inundated with requests by fans of his work.

“A lot of young people contact me through social media, or people have researched me and they’ve started looking at old Kim Jones collections. And I thought it’s nice to do something ten years after finishing it,” he smiled.

Speaking of his new gig, the British fashion mogul explained that he was looking forward to taking on a new challenge.

“I am deeply honoured to join the house of Dior, a symbol of the ultimate elegance,” he said in a statement. “I am committed to create a modern and innovative male silhouette built upon the unique legacy of the house.”

Jones will present his first collection for Dior during Paris Fashion Week: Men’s in June.

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Jonathan Anderson unveils quintessentially British collection for Uniqlo

Jonathan Anderson has taken inspiration from a traditional British beachside break for his second Uniqlo collection.The Northern Irish designer first joined forces with the Japanese retailer in 2017, bringing out his first collection in July. In Novem…

Jonathan Anderson has taken inspiration from a traditional British beachside break for his second Uniqlo collection.

The Northern Irish designer first joined forces with the Japanese retailer in 2017, bringing out his first collection in July.

In November, it was confirmed that a second line was in the works, and the brand has now shared the first look at the spring/ summer 18 offering.

“In the second collection of the collaboration, I’m looking for this idea of British Summer, the idea of being on the Brighton beach,” Anderson said in a statement. “Something which is very lightweight, very airy, with a lot of linen and cotton that has a 1950s subcultural movement. With a little bit of ease and something which is quintessential.

“As a Uniqlo customer, I know exactly the quality that the brand gives to its products. I am very proud of the level of execution and the attention to details that we delivered on this new spring/summer collection.”

Flared skirts, chequered shirts and cotton trousers all feature, with Anderson adding his signature ruffles and ribbons to lots of the garments. There are also T-shirts, knits and bags with seagull prints, a nod to British seaside life, on offer.

Fashion fans can snap up the menswear and womenswear designs in-store and online from 19 April.

Anderson, who helms his namesake label as well as Spanish label Loewe, previously spoke about how proud he was of his Uniqlo designs.

“The first Uniqlo and J.W. Anderson collaboration was super exciting for me and I was very happy with the results. I am proud of it and I think the pieces were incredibly well made. It was a good bridge between the ideal of British classicism and my own brand,” he said.

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Tomas Maier collaborating with Uniqlo on collection

Tomas Maier is teaming up with Uniqlo on a new apparel collection.The German designer is the latest fashion star to partner with the Japanese brand, which has previously collaborated with big names such as Jonathan Anderson, Jil Sander, and Carine Roit…

Tomas Maier is teaming up with Uniqlo on a new apparel collection.

The German designer is the latest fashion star to partner with the Japanese brand, which has previously collaborated with big names such as Jonathan Anderson, Jil Sander, and Carine Roitfeld.

Maier, who is the creative director of Bottega Veneta as well as the founder of his own eponymous label, confirmed his latest project on Tuesday (20Feb18) and revealed that the line will feature womenswear and menswear pieces as well as a range of accessories.

“Uniqlo has always offered their customers affordability and a designer point of view. This is just about a moment in time of getting together,” he told Business of Fashion, adding that he believed the collection would appeal to “anyone who appreciates a casually thoughtful product.”

The line was designed within the framework of Uniqlo’s LifeWear concept, which champions the brand’s desire to design clothes that will enhance everyday life.

“LifeWear embodies our belief that individuality comes not from clothes, but the people wearing them. That’s why we devote our energies to creating clothes that people will enjoy and value for a long time,” shared Yuki Katsuta, group senior vice president of fast retailing and head of global research and design at Uniqlo.

Maier has achieved great success at Bottega Veneta since joining the company in 2001, with the Italian label the fastest growing business in the Kering luxury group, beating fashion houses including Gucci, Yves Saint Laurent, and Alexander McQueen.

However, the designer has acknowledged the difference between creating high-end garments and high street pieces, and “(stuck) to the rules of manufacturing to make the product affordable,” in his latest venture.

“You have to be even more thoughtful as you’re addressing such a huge audience,” he explained.

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