Mission: Impossible 7 set to resume filming in September

Tom Cruise’s Mission: Impossible 7 is set to resume filming in September.The 57-year-old actor is reprising his role as spy Ethan Hunt in Christopher McQuarrie’s upcoming sequels, alongside Simon Pegg, Ving Rhames, Rebecca Ferguson and franchise newcom…

Tom Cruise’s Mission: Impossible 7 is set to resume filming in September.

The 57-year-old actor is reprising his role as spy Ethan Hunt in Christopher McQuarrie’s upcoming sequels, alongside Simon Pegg, Ving Rhames, Rebecca Ferguson and franchise newcomers Hayley Atwell and Pom Klementieff.

Back in February, the cast and crew were due to begin a three-week stint in the Italian city of Venice, but production was shut down by studio executives at Paramount Pictures as Italian government officials imposed a strict lockdown in an effort to stop the spread of Covid-19.

Now, first assistant director Tommy Gormley has confirmed that filming can get underway in just over three months and still be on schedule for the movie’s November 2021 release date.

“We hope to start shooting again in September. We were days from shooting in Venice – we were right at the epicentre when it all kicked off – so we had to shut down in Venice where we were four or five days from shooting,” he told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, following the publication of the British Film Commission’s new safety guidelines titled: “Working Safely During COVID-19 in Film and High-End TV Drama Production”.

“We hope to restart in September, we hope to visit all the countries we planned to and look to do a big chunk of it back in the U.K. on the backlot and in the studio, so September through to end April/May is our targets. We are convinced we can do this,” Gormley explained.

The seventh instalment was scheduled to be released in July 2021, but was pushed back to November 2021 in light of the Covid-19 outbreak. It is being filmed back-to-back with the eighth instalment.

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Venice Film Festival still set to go ahead

The 2020 edition of the Venice Film Festival will go ahead as planned in September, the region’s governor has insisted. Luca Zaia, governor of Veneto, confirmed on Sunday that the world’s longest-running festival, which is scheduled to run between 2-1…

The 2020 edition of the Venice Film Festival will go ahead as planned in September, the region’s governor has insisted.

Luca Zaia, governor of Veneto, confirmed on Sunday that the world’s longest-running festival, which is scheduled to run between 2-12 September, will proceed, according to Variety.

Zaia’s confirmation comes days after Venice Biennale officials, which oversee the film festival as well as other events, pushed back its Biennale of Architecture to 2021, but kept the film festival’s dates, despite the two usually overlapping.

The governor explained on Sunday that the Biennale of Architecture was postponed due to problems with constructing the necessary pavilions and went on to insist that the film festival is happening, although there will likely be fewer movies showcased this year.

Earlier this month, a letter signed by Venice’s artistic director Alberto Barbera was sent to a wide range of film industry personnel to find out their concerns and suggestions for the 2020 edition and whether they’d be willing to attend the event.

“We know that it would be simply impossible to plan a festival without knowing if you all are willing to use the Festival to give a new start and a strong sign for keeping cinema alive, even in these difficult times,” wrote Barbera, editors at Variety reported.

The full line-up of films showing at the festival is typically unveiled in July. In January, Cate Blanchett was named the jury president, but it is unclear if this will remain the case.

The Cannes Film Festival, which would have had its closing night over the weekend, was cancelled this year and officials revealed they hoped to screen some of their planned premieres at Venice and other festivals.

Italy, which was one of the countries hit hardest by the coronavirus crisis, has been slowly coming out of lockdown in recent weeks and is currently set to reopen its borders for European Union (EU) tourists on 3 June.

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Venice Film Festival going forward as planned

Organisers of the Venice Film Festival are determined to proceed with the 2020 edition in September, despite the current coronavirus pandemic.Major film, music, television, and sports events have all been either cancelled or postponed this year to help…

Organisers of the Venice Film Festival are determined to proceed with the 2020 edition in September, despite the current coronavirus pandemic.

Major film, music, television, and sports events have all been either cancelled or postponed this year to help curb the spread of the Covid-19 virus, with the Cannes Film Festival, which usually takes place in May, now postponed until an unspecified date.

But despite Italy being one of the countries hit hardest by the pandemic, Roberto Cicutto, president of the festival’s parent group, the Venice Biennale, told Italian news agency ANSA on Monday that the 77th edition of the Venetian festival would not be postponed or cancelled.

Cicutto also insisted that there were no plans to team up with the Cannes Film Festival on a joint event, after Cannes director Thierry Fremaux suggested the possibility of a one-off collaboration.

“With Cannes everything is possible,” Cicutto said. “But I find it disconcerting that Thierry Fremaux keeps saying he is continuing to examine the situation and does not say what he wants to do. We are going forward with our programme… there is no dialogue.”

The Venice chief said he believed Italian government officials would permit them to open “six or seven circumscribed movie theatres” for screenings during the festival, and acknowledged that international attendance at the event would be less than previous years. He added that the festival was “fine-tuning” its digital technology to help journalists who are unable to make the trip.

Italy has been in lockdown since early March, with all cinemas and non-essential businesses closed to curb the spread of Covid-19, which has infected more than 181,000 in the country, resulting in an estimated 24,000 deaths.

The crisis has already led to the postponement of Venice’s theatre and dance festivals.

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Bottega Veneta pledges to help restore Saint Mark’s Basilica

Bottega Veneta executives have pledged to help restore Saint Mark’s Basilica in Venice, Italy following the devastating floods last month.The historic building, which dates back to the latter part of the 11th century, flooded for the sixth time in mid-…

Bottega Veneta executives have pledged to help restore Saint Mark’s Basilica in Venice, Italy following the devastating floods last month.

The historic building, which dates back to the latter part of the 11th century, flooded for the sixth time in mid-November, causing damage to the marble floors, mosaics, and decoration.

Now, bosses at the luxury goods group, founded in Vicenza, Veneto in 1966, have announced that they are donating funds towards the restoration efforts.

“Bottega Veneta announces its support in the reconstruction of Saint Mark’s Basilica in Venice, an icon of artistic heritage damaged by the recent floods,” a representative said in a statement. “In collaboration with international non-profit organisation, Venetian Heritage, 30 per cent of sales from selected Bottega Veneta handbags will be donated towards the recovery of the mosaic floors and marble walls that were severely damaged.”

The initiative will include four models sold in Bottega Veneta stores across Italy and on the Italian e-commerce website.

Saint Mark’s Basilica, the most famous of the city’s Catholic churches, attracts millions of visitors each year.

Previously, organisers from the Fabbriceria – the foundation that oversees the maintenance of the building – estimated the damage to be at least $5 million (£3.8 million). In addition to preservation funds and government money, the Fabbriceria’s Pierpaolo Campostrini told Reuters that they also hope private donors will contribute.

“So many signs of affection for Saint Mark’s Basilica make me think that we’ll be in the position to keep up our great responsibility of preserving one of the most precious gems of Venice and of the entire world,” he told the outlet.

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