Off-White tops The Lyst Index’s rankings of hottest brands

Off-White has been crowned as the hottest brand in the world in The Lyst Index’s latest rankings.The label, founded by designer Virgil Abloh in 2012, is known for its stylised streetwear-inspired items which feature the use of quotation marks, zip ties…

Off-White has been crowned as the hottest brand in the world in The Lyst Index’s latest rankings.

The label, founded by designer Virgil Abloh in 2012, is known for its stylised streetwear-inspired items which feature the use of quotation marks, zip ties, and industrial buckles, with celebrity fans including Kendall Jenner, Bella Hadid, Hailey Bieber, JAY-Z, Nicki Minaj, and Rihanna.

Now, researchers have compiled data from the fashion platform Lyst for the third quarter of 2019 and claimed Off-White has come out on top in relation to global Lyst and Google search data, conversion rates and sales, as well as brand and product social media mentions and engagement statistics worldwide.

Balenciaga, helmed by creative director Demna Gvasalia, was the runner-up, while Gucci fell back two spots in comparison to last quarter and landed in third place.

Other luxury brands in the top 10 included Versace, Prada, Valentino, Fendi, Burberry, Saint Laurent, and Vetements, while notable additions to the top 20 this quarter were Bottega Veneta and Loewe.

Since Daniel Lee joined Bottega Veneta in June 2018, the Italian fashion house has undergone a huge revamp, with the designer winning acclaim for his minimalist designs and Stretch sandals, which immediately sold out upon release following the launch of the label’s pre-fall 2019 collection.

“Daniel Lee has brought incredible energy to the evolution of Bottega Veneta and the reaction has been extraordinary,” Dario Gargiulo, chief marketing officer of Bottega Veneta, said of the brand’s transformation. “Free from any desire to become the hottest brand in the world, our focus is on the beauty and power of subtlety. We forego extensive explanation about our brand in favour of simply being visible and present across the current multicultural landscape.”

Among the most popular products were Bottega Veneta’s padded sandals, Adidas Continental 80 sneakers, Jacquemus’ pocket-sized Le Chiquito bag, Paco Rabanne’s reissued 1969 metal shoulder bag, Fendi’s FF motif bikini, and Mansur Gavriel’s cloud print sweater.

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Celine Dion only wears outfits which make her feel ‘strong’

Celine Dion only wants to wear outfits which make her feel “strong”.The Canadian superstar first began her transformation from popstar to chic fashionista back in 2016 after she hired stylist Law Roach to switch-up her wardrobe and stage outfits for he…

Celine Dion only wants to wear outfits which make her feel “strong”.

The Canadian superstar first began her transformation from popstar to chic fashionista back in 2016 after she hired stylist Law Roach to switch-up her wardrobe and stage outfits for her Las Vegas residency gigs.

Now, she’s rocking pieces from the likes of Vetements, Off-White, and Chanel, and accordingly, credits her bold fashion choices to her fearless approach to life.

“So, courage… it represents a whole new life for me, my album, the tour, the way to dress, the way to say you can’t please everyone,” Celine told Entertainment Tonight. “I dress for me; the way I feel. I want to feel that I feel great about myself, I feel strong about myself, I feel good about my decisions with the help of a lot of people, but it’s all about courage and I think everyone should feel like that.”

The My Heart Will Go On hitmaker is releasing a new album, aptly titled Courage, in November and is overjoyed to have control over her music.

“I think I was always courageous. I hope it doesn’t sound pretentious to say that, but I always stressed a lot. We always kind of like just do whatever they suggest to me – not that I was a robot or anything, not to sound kind of weird, like, ‘Do this, do that.’ But I feel like right now I’m more in charge than ever before and this is definitely a part of my life where the maturity kicks in,” the 51-year-old smiled.

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Demna Gvasalia departing Vetements

Demna Gvasalia is stepping down from Vetements “to pursue new ventures”.The Georgian designer, who co-founded the Zurich-based fashion house with his brother Guram Gvasalia in 2014, announced the news in a statement to WWD over the weekend. “I started …

Demna Gvasalia is stepping down from Vetements “to pursue new ventures”.

The Georgian designer, who co-founded the Zurich-based fashion house with his brother Guram Gvasalia in 2014, announced the news in a statement to WWD over the weekend.

“I started Vetements because I was bored of fashion and against all odds, fashion did change once and forever since Vetements appeared and it also opened a new door for so many,” Demna stated to the fashion publication. “So, I feel that I have accomplished my mission of a conceptualist and design innovator at this exceptional brand and Vetements has matured into a company that can evolve its creative heritage into a new chapter on its own.”

The 38-year-old will continue in his role as creative director of Balenciaga. He is scheduled to unveil his spring 2020 show for the luxury label as part of Paris Fashion Week on 29 September.

“Vetements has always been a collective of creative minds. We will continue to push the boundaries even further, respecting codes and the authentic values of the brand, and keep on supporting honest creativity and genuine talent,” Guram, who is the chief executive of Vetements, added. “We are very grateful to Demna for having contributed to the great momentum of the house.”

The brothers’ statement also hinted at additional projects for Demna, who will be exiting Vetements “to pursue new ventures”.

Previously, Demna served as a senior designer at Louis Vuitton, working with Marc Jacobs and then briefly under Nicolas Ghesquiere.

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Vetements hit with criticism over divisive ‘Don’t Shoot’ T-shirt

Vetements has been criticised for including a T-shirt with the words “Don’t Shoot” in its latest line.The Zurich-based clothing brand, founded by Georgian designer Demna Gvasalia, is no stranger to controversy, having previously hit headlines for selli…

Vetements has been criticised for including a T-shirt with the words “Don’t Shoot” in its latest line.

The Zurich-based clothing brand, founded by Georgian designer Demna Gvasalia, is no stranger to controversy, having previously hit headlines for selling a T-shirt with the logo of courier company DHL on it in 2016 and the following year, releasing jewellery that doubles as drug paraphernalia.

However, Vetements is now facing scrutiny for including a white T-shirt with “Don’t Shoot” written in red text in Arabic, French, and English at its spring/summer 2020 show held as part of Paris Fashion Week: Men’s last week.

Noting that the top is similar to those worn by journalists in Lebanon during the Israeli invasion in 1982, one Twitter user named Sarina commented, “Didn’t know I couldn’t hate Vetements even more. This T-shirt was worn by War reporters in Beirut during the 1982 conflict between Lebanon and Israel. This war is the primary reason why I had to leave Lebanon to the U.S. then Canada. And Vetements thinks it’s a fashion piece?????????”

While Lebanese influencer Samar Seraqui de Buttafoco shared a lengthy post on Instagram in which she insisted Vetements’ T-shirt was “more serious” than cultural appropriation.

“This is business activism for DUMMIES. Hope you will act like a responsible consumer. Hope some fashion editors will dedicate time to think and report. Hope to more respectability in the fashion industry,” she wrote.

In addition, others pointed out that Khalid Al-Qasimi, founder of London-based brand Qasimi, had made a version of the original T-shirt for his fall 2017 collection with the intention of making a political statement.

Emphasising the he doesn’t have copyright to the logo, Al-Qasimi told Vogue Arabia: “I used that print to highlight the plight of something going on in the Middle East. For Vetements to use it in such a flippant and provocative manner; I don’t think they realise what these words mean to us Arabs.”

Representatives for Vetements and Gvasalia are yet to comment on the criticism.

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Courtney Love fumes over Vetements’ Kurt Cobain replica T-shirt

Courtney Love has blasted Vetements for allegedly ripping off a T-shirt once worn by her late husband Kurt Cobain.Showing off one of the looks from the fall/winter 19 “surprise drop” on Instagram, featuring a green-haired model dressed in a white T-shi…

Courtney Love has blasted Vetements for allegedly ripping off a T-shirt once worn by her late husband Kurt Cobain.

Showing off one of the looks from the fall/winter 19 “surprise drop” on Instagram, featuring a green-haired model dressed in a white T-shirt with the slogan “Corporate magazine still suck Alot!”, a baggy cardigan, ripped jeans and chunky black biker boots, fans were quick to point out designer Demna Gvasalia’s creation was a near exact replica of a top Cobain wore for a magazine cover shoot.

Getting wind of the style scandal, Love added her own message underneath the post.

“You guys WHAT the F**K? I hate being put in this position. You should know better!” she fumed.

Grunge originator Cobain, who committed suicide in 1994 at the age of 27, wore a white T-shirt with the words “Corporate magazine still suck” scrawled across the front for a Rolling Stone shoot with Nirvana bandmates Dave Grohl and Krist Novoselic in 1992. He teamed the garment with a cardigan and jeans.

This is the second fashion fight to involve Nirvana in recent months. In December, the band’s legal team began proceedings to sue Marc Jacobs over the alleged theft of their yellow smiley face logo – a trademark they have owned since 1992. Jacobs debuted the design, which features letters M and J in place of the eyes, as part of his re-released Bootleg Redux Grunge collection.

In March, the designer’s lawyers sought to have the legal case dismissed. In their filing, it was cited that Love was a big fan of the Marc Jacobs brands, and attorneys highlighted how, after first meeting the singer and her then two-year-old daughter Frances Bean Cobain in 1994, the three forged a long-standing working relationship.

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Demna Gvasalia didn’t anticipate success of Balenciaga’s Triple S sneakers

Demna Gvasalia had no idea Balenciaga’s Triple S sneakers would be so popular.The Georgian designer led teams at Maison Martin Margiela and Louis Vuitton in the past and is now garnering critical acclaim as creative director of Balenciaga and Vetements…

Demna Gvasalia had no idea Balenciaga’s Triple S sneakers would be so popular.

The Georgian designer led teams at Maison Martin Margiela and Louis Vuitton in the past and is now garnering critical acclaim as creative director of Balenciaga and Vetements.

Gvasalia first introduced the chunky-soled Triple S as part of his fall/winter 2017 Balenciaga menswear line, with the shoe quickly selling out and sparking the trend for “dad sneakers,” however, he is adamant that he never anticipated such strong interest in the creation.

“(The) Triple S became that commercial success that we didn’t expect,” he stated in an interview with The Washington Post. “We were not really very ready to supply the demand that we were actually getting… Everybody asks us, even the driver, like the Uber driver, asks me, ‘So when is there a new sneaker coming out?'”

A pair of Triple S sneakers cost around $830 (£645), with the shoes all currently sold out on the Balenciaga website. There is a huge demand for the designs on resale websites too, yet Gvasalia doesn’t view himself as the king of the “ugly” sneaker.

“I cannot feel the ownership or responsibility, for example, for ugly sneakers or whatever they call it. I cannot feel that responsibility because I truly do not consider Triple S as an ugly sneaker,” the 38-year-old continued. “I don’t like ugly things. Like, I don’t know who came up with that. I actually love beautiful things; but I maybe try to see beauty in other things that are not conventionally considered as beautiful today.”

Elsewhere in the discussion, Gvasalia spoke about his fall/winter 2019 ready-to-wear line for Balenciaga, and upheaval within the fashion world. He also chatted about his other controversial design – a $2,000 (£1,550) blue leather tote which resembles an expensive Ikea bag.

“I used, a lot, the actual Ikea bag in my student time. I always thought how great (it) would it be to have the same thing, but in a beautiful, luxurious bag,” he explained of the inspiration.

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Demna Gvasalia switching up Balenciaga’s show schedules

Demna Gvasalia is scrapping pre-collections at Balenciaga.The Georgian designer is one of the busiest men in fashion, working as the creative director of Balenciaga and head designer of Vetements.While he relishes his busy workload, Gvasalia has decide…

Demna Gvasalia is scrapping pre-collections at Balenciaga.

The Georgian designer is one of the busiest men in fashion, working as the creative director of Balenciaga and head designer of Vetements.

While he relishes his busy workload, Gvasalia has decided to switch things up so he doesn’t get burned out.

“Three months to make a collection? Everyone knows it’s a problem. People have burnout, creatives are going crazy, and merchandisers have no idea what to merchandise,” he sighed to WWD. “It’s a big confusion going on in our industry and I’m one of the few to speak about it. I realised that I cannot go on doing it because it’s somehow almost disrespectful to the creative process, and to someone who wants to transform an idea into a credible product.”

Instead, he’s proposing to make two bumper collections a year: one combining winter and spring, and the other summer and autumn.

He’ll show off his new idea during the Balenciaga Paris Fashion Week show on Sunday (03Mar19).

“The idea of seasons today, it’s very theoretical,” he noted. “For spring, I have requests to do fur coats.”

As well as easing Gvasalia’s workload, the new approach will also reduce waste.

He says it will be more sustainable to have two shows per year, unifying women’s and men’s collections “under one vision”, and will be both better for the environment and his mental state.

“The new, more sustainable way of working for me is not only, you know, not using toxic gas etc., but it’s also not throwing out ideas that are sometimes very good,” Gvasalia said. “I don’t know if people realise that it takes a lot of effort to have an idea.”

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Off-White named ‘hottest brand on the planet’

Off-White has been named the hottest brand on the planet in Lyst’s quarterly rankings.The results are released every three months based on the global fashion search engine’s analysis of the shopping behaviour of more than five million people across 12,…

Off-White has been named the hottest brand on the planet in Lyst’s quarterly rankings.

The results are released every three months based on the global fashion search engine’s analysis of the shopping behaviour of more than five million people across 12,000 designers and online stores. This accounts for Google search data, conversion rates, sales, brand mentions and engagement statistics on social media.

Off-White has risen 33 places over the past year, and has now surpassed Gucci and Balenciaga for the number one spot for the first time. These fashion houses are now in second and third place, respectively, followed by Nike, Prada, and Versace. Kanye West’s Yeezy takes seventh spot, while Vetements, Fendi, and Valentino round off the top ten.

This quarter, founder and chief executive officer, Virgil Abloh, released The Ten sneaker collaboration series with Nike and dressed Serena Williams for the 50th edition of the U.S. Open in New York.

Searches for Off-White across Lyst’s partner retailers are now up 14 per cent quarter on quarter, while traffic to Off-White products online increased 10 per cent in August (18).

The label’s logo belt and denim jacket also feature on Lyst’s women’s product list, but the top spot in these rankings went to Dior’s Saddle bag, which was recently resurrected by creative director Maria Grazia Chiuri.

Off-White was also honoured on Tuesday (23Oct18) when it was nominated in the prestigious Brand of the Year category at The Fashion Awards alongside Balenciaga, Burberry, Gucci, and Prada. The streetwear label has also received a nod in the Urban Luxe category, while Abloh is up for Designer of the Year for his work in the menswear department of Louis Vuitton.

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Juicy Couture making New York Fashion Week debut

Juicy Couture is to hold its first-ever New York Fashion Week show.The label, famed for the velour tracksuits that celebrities including Paris Hilton and Jennifer Lopez favoured in the early 2000s, will present its latest collection on 8 February (18)….

Juicy Couture is to hold its first-ever New York Fashion Week show.

The label, famed for the velour tracksuits that celebrities including Paris Hilton and Jennifer Lopez favoured in the early 2000s, will present its latest collection on 8 February (18).

After struggling to move past the success of its tracksuits, Juicy has enjoyed a revival of late, which began after Authentic Brands Group (ABG) acquired it in 2013.

The main contemporary collection was rebranded as Juicy Couture Black Label in 2015, and a year later, Demna Gvasalia’s label Vetements tapped the brand for a high-fashion collaboration. The garments were on show at Couture Fashion Week in Paris, with Gvasalia re-imagining the famous velour fabric.

And in September 2017, A-list stylist Jamie Mizrahi was hired as the new creative director.

“Juicy Couture is synonymous with the tracksuit, an association that is a great source of pride for us,” Mizrahi said, according to Business of Fashion. “That said, as a global brand it’s important that consumers know we offer so much more.”

Ahead of the show, Natasha Fishman, executive vice president of marketing at ABG, praised Mizrahi’s “unique approach” to Juicy’s newest chapter.

“We have enlisted literally hundreds of influencers from around the world to tell the new story of Juicy through their personal experiences – how they wear it, how they style it, how they make Juicy their own,” she shared. “Jamie has enlisted a unique approach to design where she has tapped into the Juicy archives modernising design elements that made Juicy Couture so iconic.”

As well as pieces from the Juicy Couture Black Label, there will be more casual designs from the secondary line, Juicy by Juicy Couture, on show at New York Fashion Week.

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