Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh join 2020 LVMH Prize jury

Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh are to help judge the 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers competition.Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designers …

Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh are to help judge the 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers competition.

Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designers competition open to designers from around the world who have produced at least two collections and who are under 40.

On Tuesday, organisers announced that this year’s winner will be announced at an event held at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris on 5 June, with McCartney and Louis Vuitton menswear designer Abloh among the panel.

Singer Rihanna, who launched her Fenty clothing label in partnership with the luxury conglomerate last year, will also be on the jury.

“For this seventh edition, I am delighted to announce the arrival of Virgil Abloh, former Prize finalist, Robyn Rihanna Fenty, and Stella McCartney in the jury of the LVMH Prize,” said Delphine Arnault, executive vice president of Louis Vuitton, in a statement. “They will be joining our prestigious panel which includes: Jonathan Anderson, Kris Van Assche, Nicolas Ghesquiere, Maria Grazia Chiuri, Marc Jacobs, Clare Waight Keller as well as Sidney Toledano, Jean-Paul Claverie and I. I wish to thank them for their involvement and their support to young creation. The prize is an incredible opportunity for these young designers to be appraised by them and to enjoy their advice.”

Those in the running for the 2020 LVMH Prize include New York-based designer Peter Do, British-Indian designer Supriya Lele, British menswear designer Priya Ahluwalia of Ahluwalia, French menswear designer Charaf Tajer of Casablanca, Emma Chopova and Laura Lowena of womenswear brand Chopova Lowena, London-based menswear designer Nicholas Daley, South African womenswear designer Sindiso Khumalo, and Japanese womenswear designer Tomotaka Koizumi of Tomo Koizumi.

The winner will take home $340,000 (£260,000) and receive support from executives at the company for 12 months.

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Yolanda Hadid makes runway return during Off-White fall 20 show

Yolanda Hadid made her runway return during the Off-White presentation on Thursday night.The Netherlands-born reality TV star worked as a model for 15 years before moving to Los Angeles in the mid-1990s and starting a family with her then-husband Moham…

Yolanda Hadid made her runway return during the Off-White presentation on Thursday night.

The Netherlands-born reality TV star worked as a model for 15 years before moving to Los Angeles in the mid-1990s and starting a family with her then-husband Mohamed Hadid.

While Yolanda is now often spotted in attendance at the fashion shows her daughters Gigi and Bella Hadid appear in, she couldn’t refuse an invitation from Off-White creative director Virgil Abloh to take to the catwalk alongside her oldest children as part of his fall/winter 2020 show in Paris.

Abloh told Vogue reporters backstage that he was excited by the idea of having a family involved in the spectacle, which was titled Slightly Off.

“I think, ‘What better sort of muse than not just one woman, but a family unit, the three of them, a family of models?’ I wanted to have that be the anchor of the show,” he said.

Bella opened the show wearing a deconstructed black jacket, long pleated skirt, and chain link necklace, while Gigi closed the spectacle in an avant-garde number comprised of a blue raincoat merged with an enormous white dress.

Yolanda, 56, took to the catwalk right in the middle, wearing a pair of black pencil trousers, a white blazer with black graffiti print, and black sunglasses.

And Bella was thrilled to have the opportunity to work alongside her mother.

“It was amazing to walk the runway with her. I think that the outfit he put her in was perfect. It was the most amazing feeling because she’s always been the one that kind of gave us tips, and I think today I was more nervous than her,” she added.

Elsewhere in the presentation, Abloh offered up slinky dresses with round cutouts, cow print fabric, utilitarian jumpsuits, and metallic gowns with off-the-shoulder necklines.

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Lanvin channels retro glamour for fall 20 collection

Lanvin has gone for full-on retro glamour for its fall/winter 2020 collection.Creative director Bruno Sialelli, who was appointed to helm the French house in January 2019, presented his third line at La Galerie des Gobelins as part of Paris Fashion Wee…

Lanvin has gone for full-on retro glamour for its fall/winter 2020 collection.

Creative director Bruno Sialelli, who was appointed to helm the French house in January 2019, presented his third line at La Galerie des Gobelins as part of Paris Fashion Week on Wednesday, with the show attracting celebrities such as Isabelle Huppert, Yolanda Hadid, Tyga, Teyana Taylor, Louis Vuitton menswear designer Virgil Abloh, and British Vogue editor-in-chief Edward Enninful.

Regarding his inspiration for the line, Sialelli looked through the archives of label founder Jeanne Lanvin and contemplated the peak of the couture brand during its 1920s heyday.

To begin, a model walked the runway in a burgundy leather wing coat with matching boots and teal leather gloves. A number of similar silhouettes followed, all accessorised with either gold bracelets, gloves, and calf-length boots.

Coats were a big focus, with Sialelli offering up leather, check, and belted wool versions with oversized shoulder detailing, with Bella Hadid stepping out in a luxurious white number with gold buttons and fluffy collar.

“LANVIN!!! My dream coat, music, show … thank you to my dears,” the model captioned a snap on Instagram following the spectacle.

Elsewhere, the designer included long printed dresses, sheer black outfits with lace trim, knitwear separates and chic suiting, with the choice of beige and mint green fabric for the two-pieces referencing the signature pastel hues of the house.

To conclude, Sialelli unveiled a range of flapper-esque dresses, with Adut Akech in a black and silver beaded ensemble and Gigi Hadid sporting a shorter style alongside a navy coat and red gloves.

“Kicked off Paris closing the beautiful @lanvinofficial show yesterday. Congrats & thank you @brunosialelli,” she posted.

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Off-White continues reign as world’s hottest brand

Off-White has once again been crowned the most sought-after brand in the world.The label, founded by designer Virgil Abloh in 2012, is known for its stylised streetwear-inspired items which feature the use of quotation marks, zip ties, and industrial b…

Off-White has once again been crowned the most sought-after brand in the world.

The label, founded by designer Virgil Abloh in 2012, is known for its stylised streetwear-inspired items which feature the use of quotation marks, zip ties, and industrial buckles, with celebrity fans including Bella Hadid, JAY-Z, and Nicki Minaj.

Now, analysts have compiled data from the fashion platform Lyst for the fourth quarter of 2019 and reported that Off-White has come out on top in relation to global Lyst and Google search data, conversion rates and sales, as well as social media mentions and engagement statistics worldwide. The company also topped The Lyst Index for the previous quarter.

Gucci, helmed by creative director Alessandro Michele, was the runner-up, while Balenciaga landed in third place.

Other luxury brands in the top 10 included Versace, Fendi, Prada, Valentino, and Burberry, though the most surprising leap in rankings came from Moncler.

Nabbing the fourth spot, executives at the lifestyle label have found success over the past three years by harnessing a guest designer roster, which has included capsule collections from the likes of Simone Rocha, Craig Green, and Richard Quinn.

Meanwhile, Gucci’s logo belt was once again the hottest in the list of women’s products, with Amina Muaddi’s Gilda heels taking second place.

“As seen on Kendall Jenner and Hailey Bieber, Muaddi’s Gilda heels sparked an average of 60,500 monthly searches between October and December, while the brand saw a 73 per cent rise in views,” a Lyst spokesperson commented.

Other popular accessories include Prada’s Monolith boots, a scarf from Acne Studios, Spanx’s faux leather leggings, Balenciaga’s Hourglass top handle bag, and the UGG Scuffette II slippers.

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Louis Vuitton’s Virgil Abloh plays with menswear codes for fall 20

Virgil Abloh has experimented with the codes of menswear for his latest Louis Vuitton line.The French luxury label’s head menswear designer, who took some time off to focus on his health in late 2019, returned to the spotlight on Thursday to unveil his…

Virgil Abloh has experimented with the codes of menswear for his latest Louis Vuitton line.

The French luxury label’s head menswear designer, who took some time off to focus on his health in late 2019, returned to the spotlight on Thursday to unveil his fall/winter 2020 collection at the Jardin des Tuileries as part of Paris Fashion Week: Men’s.

The venue had a surrealist cloudscape installed for the backdrop, while the rest of the set was decorated with oversized sewing tools, such as fabric scissors and cotton thread.

Describing the range as an “ode to the freedom of thought,” Abloh opted away from the streetwear influences of his previous collections and instead focused on the suit, offering up sharply tailored versions as well as ensembles with deconstructed elements.

“By studying the evolving anthropology of the suit, Louis Vuitton’s artistic director twists and turns traditional codes through a variety of techniques: shirts and ties are folded and wrapped around the body then pressed into a single shirt, Broderie Anglaise is magnified and rendered in suiting material,” a Louis Vuitton representative explained. “Within Abloh’s ongoing exploration of the constraints of menswear, this collection sees tailoring and suiting depart from a corporate comfort zone to be re-appropriated and embraced.”

The show opened with a model wearing a beige suit, white shirt, black Chelsea boots and carrying a tan leather tote, with a parade of similar outfits following. Abloh also played with accessories, including belts, tie clips, suspenders and gloves, with highlights including a grey suit paired with a hot pink bucket hat and a shirt manufactured with interwoven pieces of fabric. To conclude, the fashion star ramped up the surrealist elements of the procession, introducing a line of suits made from blue and white material that resembled clouds. The outfits were accessorised with metallic face masks and reflective sunglasses.

Paris Fashion Week: Men’s continues on Friday with shows from Lemaire and Zadig & Voltaire.

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Virgil Abloh wants to represent a generation

Virgil Abloh aspires to represent a generation with his fashion designs.The founder of Off-White and artistic director of Louis Vuitton’s menswear department was first inspired to make clothing more representative after being refused entry to several s…

Virgil Abloh aspires to represent a generation with his fashion designs.

The founder of Off-White and artistic director of Louis Vuitton’s menswear department was first inspired to make clothing more representative after being refused entry to several shows back in 2009 during a visit to Paris Fashion Week with Kanye West.

Back then, Abloh discovered that the industry “wasn’t particularly welcoming”, but he has been driven ever since to make sure young designers and fashion fans aren’t excluded.

“I don’t know how many shows I’ve done since 2016 but it’s been enjoyable to define the space that I would perceivably be put in,” he told Dazed magazine. “My motivation this whole time has been to represent for a generation – I’m still thinking about the kid that couldn’t get into fashion shows.”

Abloh believes streetwear has helped to promote diversity and inclusivity in the business, and has worked together with the likes of Shayne Oliver from Hood by Air to create a “new atmosphere”.

“I’ve never been one that felt like the doors were closing – I’m an optimist so I don’t even recognise that, that’s how I got to where I’m at. I think that what helped it along was streetwear was also a global concept,” the 39-year-old stated.

Despite acknowledging the success of his streetwear, Abloh confessed he was initially disappointed that his clothing was described as that by the press.

“From that frustration, I decided if ‘streetwear’ was gonna be the sign of the times I was gonna define it rather than be defined by it. I needed to do a show to define what ‘streetwear’ could be, and do it with urgency, you know,” he added.

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Virgil Abloh: ‘Working for a fashion house felt like an impossible dream’

Louis Vuitton’s Virgil Abloh never thought he’d be designing for a prestigious fashion house because of his upbringing. The 39-year-old entered the world of international fashion with an internship at Fendi in 2009 before going on to found his own lab…

Louis Vuitton’s Virgil Abloh never thought he’d be designing for a prestigious fashion house because of his upbringing.

The 39-year-old entered the world of international fashion with an internship at Fendi in 2009 before going on to found his own label Off-White in 2013 and become the artistic director of Louis Vuitton’s menswear department in March 2018.

But in an interview with Dazed, the designer admitted he never thought he would work for a luxury fashion house.

“To come from designing a graphic T-shirt in 2012 to making it to a house to design a collection… As a young black kid from Rockford, Illinois, from immigrant parents from Ghana, West Africa, that was like, impossible, you know?” he recalled. “Like, categorically not gonna happen in a lifetime. I thought that fashion was one of those industries that would reinforce people feeling that ‘This isn’t for you’, ‘If you don’t have this shirt, you’re not in the club.'”

After his debut fashion show for Louis Vuitton in June 2018, Abloh posted a picture of himself taking his final bow on Instagram and wrote in the caption, “You can do it too.”

Accordingly, he explained in the chat that he wanted to inspire others to reach for seemingly impossible dreams too.

And the fashion star considers that show to be one of the most fulfilling moments of his career because he could use the Louis Vuitton platform to express himself.

“To me it was about making like an art piece of fashion, using the megaphone that is Louis Vuitton, one of the oldest brands in Paris, to have the first models that came out, look like me, dressed in all white on a prism coloured runway show in daylight,” Abloh continued. “I wanted to make a statement and use the clothes to power that and I feel fulfilled that that body of work came out the way it did and when it did.”

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Virgil Abloh predicts death of streetwear over next decade

Virgil Abloh has predicted that the streetwear trend will “die” in the next 10 years.The 39-year-old designer, who is famed for his casual clothing creations for Louis Vuitton menswear and his own Off-White label, made the startling prediction during a…

Virgil Abloh has predicted that the streetwear trend will “die” in the next 10 years.

The 39-year-old designer, who is famed for his casual clothing creations for Louis Vuitton menswear and his own Off-White label, made the startling prediction during an interview with Dazed magazine.

When asked what he thought would happen to the “idea of streetwear” in the next decade, he candidly replied: “I would definitely say it’s gonna die, you know? Like, its time will be up. In my mind, how many more T-shirts can we own, how many more hoodies, how many sneakers?”

Abloh went on to explain that he believed there will be a bigger focus on vintage and recycled clothes.

“I think that like we’re gonna hit this like, really awesome state of expressing your knowledge and personal style with vintage – there are so many clothes that are cool that are in vintage shops and it’s just about wearing them,” he shared.

“I think that fashion is gonna go away from buying a boxfresh something; it’ll be like, ‘Hey I’m gonna go into my archive.'”

His comments about the death of the trend come just days after it was announced Off-White had partnered with the Louvre Museum in Paris to create a streetwear capsule collection inspired by the works of Leonardo da Vinci.

However, Abloh is still intrigued by the possibilities that lay ahead in the next 10 years.

“I’m excited to see what we do in this next chapter, because the strides we made in the last ten years are too insane,” Abloh added.

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Off-White’s Virgil Abloh unveils capsule collection for The Louvre

Off-White’s Virgil Abloh has teamed up with executives at The Louvre on a capsule collection.To mark the launch of the highly anticipated Leonardo da Vinci exhibition at the museum in Paris, Abloh has created a line of clothes that celebrate the life a…

Off-White’s Virgil Abloh has teamed up with executives at The Louvre on a capsule collection.

To mark the launch of the highly anticipated Leonardo da Vinci exhibition at the museum in Paris, Abloh has created a line of clothes that celebrate the life and works of the visionary artist.

“I was fascinated with Leonardo early on – I was in my senior year at Wisconsin, taking an art class,” said Abloh, founder and artistic director of Off-White. “I was super interested not only by his artworks but also by the influence he had in many disciplines besides art: science, engineering, architecture… To me, he symbolises everything the Renaissance was.”

The clothing range features some of Da Vinci’s iconic artworks, such as the Virgin of the Rocks, and Saint Anne, the Virgin Mary, and the Infant Jesus Playing with a Lamb.

However, Abloh has incorporated his own aesthetic into the T-shirt and hoodie designs, adding in Off-White’s signature logos and diamond arrows.

“I want to crash together these two worlds that are seemingly different: fashion and high art. It’s a crucial part of my overall body of work to prove that any place, no matter how exclusive it seems, is accessible to everyone. That you can be interested in expressing yourself through more than one practice and that creativity does not have to be tied to just one discipline. I think that Leonardo da Vinci was maybe the first artist to live by that principle, and I am trying to as well,” the 39-year-old commented.

Items in the line are priced from $355 – $640 (£266- £480). The collection will be available to buy from the Louvre gift shop and online, as well as from select Off-White boutiques.

The new Leonardo da Vinci exhibition runs until 24 February.

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Virgil Abloh back to work at Louis Vuitton

Virgil Abloh is back working at Louis Vuitton after taking some time off to focus on his health.The fashion designer, who serves as creative director of menswear at the French luxury brand and is also the founder of streetwear label Off-White, announce…

Virgil Abloh is back working at Louis Vuitton after taking some time off to focus on his health.

The fashion designer, who serves as creative director of menswear at the French luxury brand and is also the founder of streetwear label Off-White, announced in early September that he would be embarking on a temporary hiatus from his roles as he was having a difficult time recovering from a recent overseas trip.

However, on Monday, Abloh took to Instagram to post a mirror selfie of himself posing in an elevator at the Louis Vuitton headquarters in Paris. He is pictured wearing a red and yellow jacket as well as a baseball cap but did not write anything in the caption.

While he was spending time at home, the 39-year-old missed Off-White’s Paris Fashion Week show and a scheduled public appearance at Vogue’s Forces of Fashion summit. It remains unclear if he will be at the opening of his Figures of Speech exhibition at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia on Friday.

Back in September, Abloh indicated to reporters at Vogue.com that he was suffering from exhaustion following months of hectic fashion shows and travel.

“I was just tired, so I went to the doctor. Ultimately, everything is fine, but the doctor told me, ‘This pace that you’ve sort of pushed your body – to fly all these miles, do all these different projects – is not good for your health,'” the designer explained. “Essentially I’m working from home for the next three months, and in large part all my marketing events I’m cancelling.”

The break also meant Abloh could spend time with his two young children, whom he shares with his wife Shannon Sundberg.

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