Tom Ford: ‘Fashion makes people feel better’

Tom Ford believes fashion can make anyone feel better.The designer and director discussed the power of having a good wardrobe during an interview with his close friend and eco-activist Livia Firth for Vogue Arabia and said that feeling beautiful can ev…

Tom Ford believes fashion can make anyone feel better.

The designer and director discussed the power of having a good wardrobe during an interview with his close friend and eco-activist Livia Firth for Vogue Arabia and said that feeling beautiful can even help those with depression.

“For me, beauty is a way of feeling that everything will be OK. Like a shield,” Ford explained. “When you feel depressed, you get dressed up and it makes you feel better. I think that beautiful things are a way to make you dream in a way that films do. It transports you.”

He went on to add that he was heavily influenced by his mother and grandmother while growing up and shared his longing for the days when people held onto things and treasured expensive items.

“My grandmother enhanced my childhood dramatically. Even if I just think about her, the smell of her, the look of her, her voice… I feel happy. You know she didn’t throw things away, or have the same disposable culture that people do now,” he said, noting that he never once saw his grandmother without her make-up.

“It was a different period and I don’t know that it’s still modern by today’s standards. My mother always has her hair done… As a child it certainly seemed magical.”

Elsewhere in the interview, he shared what he wants to achieve as chairman of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA), such as continuing to explore his passion of supporting young and upcoming designers in the industry through the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund.

“For me, the number one focus should be to support students and young emerging designers on a global scale,” he stated, before announcing that there will now be an additional CFDA award for sustainability.

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Tom Ford ‘quite torn’ over eco-friendly fashion

Tom Ford has admitted he’s “quite torn” about changing his designs and materials to become sustainable.In a new interview with his friend Livia Firth for Vogue Arabia, the designer discussed the cruelty-free fashion movement and the ways in which his f…

Tom Ford has admitted he’s “quite torn” about changing his designs and materials to become sustainable.

In a new interview with his friend Livia Firth for Vogue Arabia, the designer discussed the cruelty-free fashion movement and the ways in which his fellow designers such as Stella McCartney are championing vegan-friendly products.

Ford was asked by eco-activist Firth about how he’s making his luxury clothes sustainable, and he opened up on his struggle to combine his chic ideas with alternative materials.

“I’m quite torn. I’m torn over natural leather and fur versus fake, because fake fur takes thousands of years to biodegrade whereas fur biodegrades in six months,” he explained, adding that he also still uses polyester, which is produced using harmful chemicals and high emissions. “If you’re using real fur then there’s the cruelty to animals, which is horrible, but you could also use fur that is a food by-product. But then, of course, you’re polluting the planet because of the methane from the cattle. So, what is the best solution?”

While the 58-year-old did reveal he has changed the finishing lacquers used on his collections and is cutting down on packaging, he also confessed that he isn’t addressing the problems fast fashion is creating, despite serving as chairman of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA).

“For me, with the kind of customer I have, fashion has not changed. I’m still making jackets in the way they would’ve been made 75 years ago and I’m doing the same with evening dresses,” Ford stated. “I don’t address a lot of the problems that fast fashion certainly has to address or be held accountable for. In my niche of an industry it has not changed, except the packaging.”

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Halima Aden was inspired by lack of representation in fashion

Halima Aden was inspired to “do something” when she became aware of the lack of representation of Muslim women in fashion.The 22-year-old has landed a series of firsts in her career so far, including becoming the first model wearing a hijab to grace th…

Halima Aden was inspired to “do something” when she became aware of the lack of representation of Muslim women in fashion.

The 22-year-old has landed a series of firsts in her career so far, including becoming the first model wearing a hijab to grace the covers of Vogue Arabia and Allure magazine and walk a runway show during New York Fashion Week.

And earlier this year, she became the first Muslim model to appear on the cover of the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue wearing a burkini and hijab.

In an interview with InStyle, Halima shared that she was determined to help improve representation for Muslim women.

“Growing up I didn’t see representation – anywhere,” Halima said. “If you don’t see yourself represented, do something about it. Don’t just wait for someone to come along and represent you!”

She was born and raised in Kakuma, a refugee camp in Kenya where her family settled after fleeing from the civil war in Somalia, and moved to the U.S. at the age of seven.

She was inspired to push herself to become the first model to give other young Muslim girls a feeling of representation, and called her appearance in Sports Illustrated “a dream come true.”

“Growing up in the States, I never really felt represented because I never could flip through a magazine and see a girl who was wearing a hijab,” she explained. “So many young girls and women around the world look up to me; they know they can challenge themselves too. It’s about taking ownership as a young woman… Being the first is amazing, but it means nothing without a third and a fourth.”

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Kim Kardashian credits Zac Posen with introducing her to high fashion

Kim Kardashian will always be thankful to Zac Posen for introducing her to high fashion.As one of the most photographed women in the world, the reality TV personality undoubtedly has access to any clothing brand she desires. However, in an interview wi…

Kim Kardashian will always be thankful to Zac Posen for introducing her to high fashion.

As one of the most photographed women in the world, the reality TV personality undoubtedly has access to any clothing brand she desires.

However, in an interview with her husband Kanye West for the September 2019 issue of Vogue Arabia, Kardashian explained that she will always have a soft spot for New York-based designer Posen.

“Zac Posen, who was the first designer with a fashion house to believe in me when nobody did. He invited me to the CFDA Awards (in 2010) and I remember him saying to me, ‘Kim, I see this in you, can you please trust me?’ He wanted me to wear minimal make-up. I was so uncomfortable and, of course, showed up with a full face,” she shared. “That night he introduced me to Karl Lagerfeld and I sat next to (designer) Rachel Roy. I remember being so nervous and intimidated because I knew no one. Rachel was so nice, she told me who was who and introduced me to so many people.”

Kardashian has undergone a major style transformation since she began dating West in 2012 and often credits the rapper with inspiring her to be more daring with fashion.

As well as collaborating with her husband, the 38-year-old also has fond memories of working alongside Manfred Thierry Mugler, who created her crystal-studded beige Latex look for the 2019 Met Gala, Alexander Wang, Riccardo Tisci, and fashion editors Anna Wintour and Carine Roitfeld, as well as the late Karl Lagerfeld.

“I will always remember my shoot with Karl Lagerfeld that Carine styled – he wanted very specific sheets for a shot that we did so he sent someone to his own home so that we could use them,” the star added.

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Edward Enninful would love to see launch of Vogue Africa

British Vogue editor-in-chief Edward Enninful would love to see the creation of Vogue Africa.The British-Ghanaian stylist joined the fashion publication in 2017 and has since gone on to win praise for his promotion of inclusivity and diversity, especia…

British Vogue editor-in-chief Edward Enninful would love to see the creation of Vogue Africa.

The British-Ghanaian stylist joined the fashion publication in 2017 and has since gone on to win praise for his promotion of inclusivity and diversity, especially for the September 2019 edition, in which he worked alongside guest-editor Meghan, Duchess of Sussex to highlight the work of 15 inspiring women.

While Vogue is published around the world, with countries such as Japan and Italy having their own versions, Enninful has now shared that he is certain there is enough appetite in Africa for the continent to warrant its own magazine.

“We could see that at the (Conde Nast International Luxury) conference (held in Cape Town in April) – you can feel the energy and the excitement and the desire to be a part of the world conversation when it comes to luxury,” he commented in an interview with the new Vogue Business website. “It could have satellite offices in north, south, east, west that report into one place.”

Elsewhere in the discussion, Enninful spoke about how he has scoured the Vogue archives for inspiration and in some ways, views himself as a “guardian” of the fashion bible.

He also noted that he wants to encourage conversation about the “new Britain,” while simultaneously reflecting social and political changes around the world.

“The world has changed so much. People were ready to embrace something that reflected them. And for me, it was all about bringing Vogue back to what it was like in the ’70s and ’80s when it was about people, and you could see yourself,” the 47-year-old added.

Previously, Enninful’s good friend and British Vogue contributor, supermodel Naomi Campbell, also called for the launch of Vogue Africa in a chat with Reuters.

“There should be a Vogue Africa. We just had Vogue Arabia – it is the next progression. It has to be,” she said, referring to the Middle East edition, first published in March 2017.

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Winnie Harlow first reached out to Vogue Arabia co-star over Instagram

Winnie Harlow first reached out to her fellow Vogue Arabia cover star, and vitiligo sufferer, Shahad Salman a year ago.The Canadian model, who has had the skin condition since she was a child, has been tapped by the fashion publication’s editor-in-chie…

Winnie Harlow first reached out to her fellow Vogue Arabia cover star, and vitiligo sufferer, Shahad Salman a year ago.

The Canadian model, who has had the skin condition since she was a child, has been tapped by the fashion publication’s editor-in-chief Manuel Arnaut to appear alongside local rising star Shahad, who also has vitiligo, for the magazine’s June 2019 issue.

Speaking about the photoshoot, Winnie shared that she interacted with Shahad on Instagram over 12 months ago and found it amazing to be modelling next to her in Riyadh.

“Almost a year ago, Shahad made a post on Instagram with our pictures next to each other. She wrote in the caption that it was ‘weird’ how similar we looked,” she recalled in an interview for the publication. “I commented saying that it was not weird, but that she was so gorgeous.”

In addition, the photo-sharing platform was where Vogue Arabia editors spotted Shahad.

And the model couldn’t be more thrilled to have landed the gig with Winnie, especially as they are able to use the photoshoot to open up a discussion about women and positive representation.

“Before, I didn’t feel good about myself and I didn’t like the way I looked. Winnie was the person who gave me the confidence to fight. I never expected to meet her. Sharing time on the set of Vogue with her was a dream. I feel that now I, too, can inspire other girls from Arab world,” said Shahad.

Following the release of the Vogue Arabia cover, Winnie took to her Instagram to praise the team and express her excitement over landing her debut Vogue gig, with some of her celebrity followers, including Kim Kardashian, Jourdan Dunn, and Cindy Bruna, applauding her.

“After every rejection, every naysayer, every trial and tribulation. Every night travelling and living alone without my family and friends. All to be able to tell, no SHOW the world that representation matters,” the 24-year-old wrote.

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Vogue Arabia makes history by placing three black hijabi models on cover

Editors at Vogue Arabia have made history by placing three black hijabi models on the cover of the April 2019 issue.For the latest issue of the fashion publication, editor-in-chief Manuel Arnaut has tapped models Halima Aden, Ikram Abdi Omar, and Amina…

Editors at Vogue Arabia have made history by placing three black hijabi models on the cover of the April 2019 issue.

For the latest issue of the fashion publication, editor-in-chief Manuel Arnaut has tapped models Halima Aden, Ikram Abdi Omar, and Amina Adan to pose together in white ensembles and black hijabs, with the trio photographed by Txema Yeste and styled by fashion director Katie Trotter.

Regarding the decision to highlight female empowerment and what modesty means today 21-year-old Halima commented: “I think it’s important to remember that wearing a hijab is a woman’s personal choice. It doesn’t make her any better or worse than another Muslim woman. To me, it symbolises modesty and gives me a sense of power.”

The issue marks the second time Somali-American Halima has appeared on the cover of Vogue Arabia, having first starred in the magazine’s June 2017 issue, while the edition is the first time for Ikram and Amina.

Amina, the first hijabi model signed to a Danish modelling agency, noted in the accompanying interview she hopes that by sharing her own personal experiences, she can open up a dialogue about misconceptions about modest dressing.

And Ikram said she is amazed by the way in which fashion industry leaders have embraced representation and inclusion in a relatively short period of time.

“In the past, I would have had to bring extra headscarves with me just in case, but stylists mostly bring some for me now,” she noted. “They find it fascinating and get creative, which warms my heart because they see the beauty of the hijab every time a new look is created.”

In addition, the new issue of Vogue Arabia features chats with U.S. congresswoman Ilhan Omar, athletes Ibtihaj Muhammad and Zahra Lari, and CEO Ghizlan Guenez, among other inspirational women.

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Ashley Graham fronts Vogue Arabia’s Body Revolution issue

Ashley Graham has been tapped to star in the cover image for Vogue Arabia’s Body Revolution issue.The curvy model, who continues to promote messages of self-acceptance and female empowerment, is fast becoming one of the hottest names in the business an…

Ashley Graham has been tapped to star in the cover image for Vogue Arabia’s Body Revolution issue.

The curvy model, who continues to promote messages of self-acceptance and female empowerment, is fast becoming one of the hottest names in the business and has recently landed gigs for the likes of Lane Bryant, Marina Rinaldi, Revlon and Rag & Bone.

For her latest shoot, Ashley has landed the cover of Vogue Arabia and explained in an accompanying interview with the fashion publication that she believes spreading the message of “beauty beyond size” is her “destiny”.

“My mother told me that when I walked into a room, I would greet every single person – even at three years old,” she said. “It was more of an emotion that I would give people, and it would leave them feeling good about who they are. I think that’s what I’m doing today; letting women know that they are worthy, that they are beautiful, and that they can be happy with who they are in their skin.”

For the cover imagery, Ashley was photographed by Miguel Reveriego and is seen sporting a silver sequin Balmain dress, Oscar de la Renta jacket and Tasaki jewellery.

In one photo, Ashley poses alongside fellow plus-size model Paloma Elsesser, who dazzles in a silver dress from Paco Rabanne.

Born in Canada to an African-American mother and a father of Chilean-Swiss descent, Paloma also spoke about her journey to embracing her figure.

“The feelings that I have about my body today aren’t very different from the way I felt about it in the first grade,” the 26-year-old explained. “What has changed, is the way I navigate those feelings.”

Fashion designer Dima Ayad, influencer Nadine Abdel Aziz, weightlifter Amna Al Haddad and Marc Jacobs beauty ambassador Rhea Jacobs also feature in the issue.

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Iman and Imaan Hammam front cover of Vogue Arabia

Iman and Imaan Hammam has been tapped to front Vogue Arabia’s latest cover.The veteran supermodel and the Dutch runway favourite pose together for the March 2018 edition of the magazine, which celebrates the publication’s first anniversary. For the cov…

Iman and Imaan Hammam has been tapped to front Vogue Arabia’s latest cover.

The veteran supermodel and the Dutch runway favourite pose together for the March 2018 edition of the magazine, which celebrates the publication’s first anniversary.

For the cover image, Iman sports a black headpiece and white feathered ensemble and Imaan wears a white headpiece and black outfit, with the pieces courtesy of Saint Laurent and The Wrap Life designer Nnenna Stella.

“In a world exclusive, two generations of icons unite for the anniversary issue of #VogueArabia, with not one, but three covers,” a representative for the magazine wrote alongside an image of the cover on Vogue Arabia’s Instagram page. “With life stories deeply rooted in the Arab world, @imaanhammam and @the_real_iman are the perfect cover stars for the bumper March issue. In our biggest-ever issue, expect modest fashion trends, bold beauty, empowering women, icons of Arabia, celebrity interviews, and a Middle Eastern royal contributor.”

Iman, the widow of late rock star David Bowie, also took to her social media pages to upload an image of the cover. The 62-year-old shared that her beauty look had been done by Porsche Cooper using products from her Iman Cosmetics line.

“Shukran (Thank you) One for the ages!” she captioned the snap.

And 21-year-old Imaan, who was born in Amsterdam to an Egyptian father and Moroccan mother and was discovered at a train station by a fashion agent in 2010, celebrated the issue with a note posted on her Instagram page.

“MOM MY DREAM CAME TRUE!!! IMAN AND IMAAN! It was such an honor to be part of this amazing cover! Happy 1st birthday @voguearabia,” she wrote.

The new issue will hit shelves from 1 March (18).

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