Naomi Osaka launches anime-inspired face masks

Naomi Osaka has launched a capsule collection of anime face masks.The tennis ace, along with her sister Mari, teamed up with UNICEF Japan to donate all the profits from the face masks to programs that support disadvantaged young people in Japan. The 22…

Naomi Osaka has launched a capsule collection of anime face masks.

The tennis ace, along with her sister Mari, teamed up with UNICEF Japan to donate all the profits from the face masks to programs that support disadvantaged young people in Japan.

The 22-year-old worked on the anime-inspired masks from her home in Los Angeles, with her sister helping with the design process while self-isolating in Florida, and Mari confessed that her Grand Slam-winning sibling was the brains behind the initiative.

“The idea came from Naomi at the beginning. I just kind of helped her with the design,” she told U.S. Vogue, noting that she and Naomi were keen to help stop the spread of Covid-19 by using their love of fashion.

“I was seeing everyone in the U.S. wearing the same medical mask, and I remember in Japan even before this whole situation happened, everyone was wearing masks and they were quite fashionable,” Naomi explained. “So I wanted to release a mask that wasn’t just for protection, but could also be used as a fashion statement.”

They decided to partner with UNICEF Japan on the face mask, that features a pair of cartoon animal eyes, and the siblings hope that the cute design encourages more people to wear the potentially life-saving masks.

“Why wouldn’t you want a little animal on your thing so people can really understand how cute you truly are inside?” Naomi quipped.

The Naomi and Mari Osaka x UNICEF face mask, priced at $10 (£8), is available from the tennis star’s website, naomiosaka.com.

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Edward Enninful wins top prize at Professional Publishers Awards

Edward Enninful has been honoured with the Consumer Editor prize at the Professional Publishers Awards.The British Vogue editor, who has made it his mission to make fashion more diverse since taking over at the world famous magazine in late 2017, was a…

Edward Enninful has been honoured with the Consumer Editor prize at the Professional Publishers Awards.

The British Vogue editor, who has made it his mission to make fashion more diverse since taking over at the world famous magazine in late 2017, was also lauded for Vogue’s September 2019 #ForcesForChange issue.

Sharing his joy on his social media channels, the Ghana-born British editor was quick to thank his team.

“I’m truly humbled to have been awarded Consumer Editor of the Year at the @PPA_Live awards,” he began. “I’m also thrilled to say that #BritishVogue’s September 2019 #ForcesForChange issue – guest-edited by the inimitable Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex @SussexRoyal – has won Diversity Initiative of the Year. Many thanks to my amazing team, the best an editor could ask for. Here’s to more successes! #PPAAwards

“Photographed by the late, great @TheRealPeterLindbergh, with fashion editors @Edward_Enninful and @TheRealGraceCoddington.”

He also name-checked hairstylists Didier Malige and Serge Normant, make-up artists Val Garland and Diane Kendal, and manicurists Lorraine Griffin and Yuko Tsuchihashi, as well as all the cover stars of the issue.

In other news, Vogue International editor Suzy Menkes is departing the role after six years.

“I have enjoyed every moment of my time as Editor, Vogue International, and I am proud of everything I have achieved at the company,” Menkes told Business of Fashion in an email. “The current global situation has given me – and all of us – pause for reflection. And so it is time for a new adventure, which I look forward to with excitement.”

She officially leaves in October.

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Naomi Campbell: ‘Conde Nast are developing a Vogue Africa magazine’

Naomi Campbell has claimed Conde Nast are in the process of developing a Vogue Africa magazine. The 50-year-old has long been championing the publishing house to launch an African edition of the fashion bible, which has 23 international editions, and …

Naomi Campbell has claimed Conde Nast are in the process of developing a Vogue Africa magazine.

The 50-year-old has long been championing the publishing house to launch an African edition of the fashion bible, which has 23 international editions, and in an interview with Reuters on Monday, she revealed a plan was in motion.

She said she has had conversations with people at the media company and has “come to understand that Conde Nast are working on bringing a Vogue Africa,” and it was being “looked into to be developed” before the killing of George Floyd by police sparked worldwide Black Lives Matter protests.

Responding to her comments, a spokesperson for Conde Nast told Reuters that it does not comment on future business ventures and is continuously working on the expansion of its brands globally.

The Black Lives Matter protests against racial injustice and inequality have been raging worldwide in recent weeks, causing many companies to examine the diversity in their workplace and vow to do better to have a more inclusive and representative workforce.

In recent weeks, both Conde Nast boss Roger Lynch and artistic director Anna Wintour, also U.S. Vogue’s editor-in-chief, have admitted that the company and magazine have not done enough to promote diversity and inclusivity.

Naomi, who has been in the fashion industry for 34 years, believes the movement will create job opportunities for Black designers, stylists, and make-up artists and products which cater to a wider range of consumers.

“Now the whole world is on the same page. The voices are coming out now… and I look at that with optimism that we will get our change,” she said.

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Andre Leon Talley wants more fashion houses to support Black designers

Andre Leon Talley has called for more fashion houses to begin supporting Black designers.The former editor-at-large at U.S. Vogue narrates the upcoming Black Fashion Designers virtual exhibition at The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT…

Andre Leon Talley has called for more fashion houses to begin supporting Black designers.

The former editor-at-large at U.S. Vogue narrates the upcoming Black Fashion Designers virtual exhibition at The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT), and was recently asked during an interview if he thought the industry was doing enough to be more inclusive.

“Global brands including Gucci and Prada have set up initiatives for Black members of the industry to advise them,” he told Harper’s Bazaar. “Gucci was one of the first to have this advisory board that started, I think, about a year ago, which meets regularly to discuss things that are important to the roles of Black talent in the fashion industry.

“That’s very, very significant,” the fashion journalist added.

He also discussed the Activism section of the virtual exhibition, which includes designer Kerby Jean-Raymond’s ‘They Have Names’ T-shirt from 2015, that featured the names of 13 unarmed men killed by police.

“That was a very powerful moment to use the T-shirts, because T-shirts are a universal uniform. And they are very, very, very relevant today, because there are people in the streets globally protesting for Black Lives Matter,” Andre explained. “Protesting against the social injustice of the blue murders by policemen of young Black men and women – Breonna Taylor, Sandra Bland. They are not wearing high fashion. They are usually in T-shirts.

“The T-shirt is a very important item of clothing: a man, a woman, a child, a teenager, an elder person can walk in protest in the streets in a T-shirt. It’s comfortable, it’s accessible, and it’s affordable,” he added.

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Conde Nast pledges to improve diversity after intense criticism

Conde Nast boss Roger Lynch has pledged to improve diversity after facing intense criticism.The global chief executive officer assured advertisers during a recent NewsFronts pitch that staff at the media giant, whose titles include Vogue, are “doubling…

Conde Nast boss Roger Lynch has pledged to improve diversity after facing intense criticism.

The global chief executive officer assured advertisers during a recent NewsFronts pitch that staff at the media giant, whose titles include Vogue, are “doubling down” efforts to create “positive social change”.

“It shouldn’t take the horrendous murder of innocent people like George Floyd to make us wake up as a society, but now we need to listen, learn and take quick action to be a positive force as an industry,” Lynch said during the media presentation, according to WWD.

“I’m sure many of you have been watching how this passion for creating positive social change in the world led us to hold a mirror up to ourselves as a company, too. We’re doubling down on work we’ve already been doing to build a culture that prioritises diversity and inclusion,” he added.

His pledges included hiring a new global chief diversity and inclusion officer which will “help to ensure equitable representation within our content across print, digital and video,” and also vowed to hire more people of colour.

Lynch also promised to put together an external diversity council which would work alongside content teams.

Magazines owned by Conde Nast have come under fire since the Black Lives Matter movement urged change after the death of Floyd at the hands of white police officers last month.

U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief and Conde artistic director Anna Wintour has been targeted recently, following her admission that she allowed “hurtful and intolerant” behaviour to occur at the fashion bible.

And monthly American food publication Bon Appetit was called out after a photograph of former editor-in-chief Adam Rapoport emerged of him in brown face, and allegations of racially discriminatory behaviour.

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Naomi Campbell finally shot by Black photographer for Vogue

Naomi Campbell has lauded her new Vogue Espana cover as “special” after being captured by a Black photographer for the first time for the fashion bible.Sharing a still image and a video of the shoot to her 9.3 million Instagram followers, the 50-year-o…

Naomi Campbell has lauded her new Vogue Espana cover as “special” after being captured by a Black photographer for the first time for the fashion bible.

Sharing a still image and a video of the shoot to her 9.3 million Instagram followers, the 50-year-old couldn’t hide her delight that Nadine Ijewere was the person behind the lens.

“Thank you @nadineijewere, @voguespain and the entire team,” she began her post. “This is a special cover for me. As it’s is the 1st time in my 34 year career that I was photographed by a black Photgrapher for vogue / condenast and it was a woman of color.

“Nadine it was truly an honor, I learned a new work ethic from you, a another style of how to be (sic).”

And even though she is the ultimate pro, with decades of experience, Naomi admitted she felt anxious to deliver what Nadine needed of her.

“I can’t tell you how nervous I was inside, I wanted to be able to hold up to what you envisioned and expected,” she continued. “The stillness and the quieting of oneself. This represents more than you will ever know!! Keep Rising Nadine. Shot Pre-Quarantine.”

The catwalk queen added a red heart, heart eye, and black heart emojis to end the post.

Former supermodel Carla Bruni, filmmaker Lee Daniels, and actress Ashley Benson all commented, with Gucci head Alessandro Michele among those to like the post.

London-born fashion photographer Nadine, who has Nigerian-Jamaican heritage, also uploaded the significant cover photo.

“Shot pre-quarantine @naomi for @voguespain with @nathankleinstyling It’s crazy to have been the first woman of colour to have captured Naomi in her 34 year long career !” she wrote in the caption.

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Beverly Johnson calls on Anna Wintour to address ‘structural exclusion’ at U.S. Vogue

Beverly Johnson has urged Anna Wintour to address a “culture of structural exclusion” at U.S. Vogue.Amidst the Black Lives Matter protests taking place around the world in the wake of the death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minne…

Beverly Johnson has urged Anna Wintour to address a “culture of structural exclusion” at U.S. Vogue.

Amidst the Black Lives Matter protests taking place around the world in the wake of the death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minnesota police officers in late May, Wintour issued a candid statement to her staff at the fashion magazine earlier this month in which she expressed her regret over not doing enough to promote diversity and inclusivity during her 32-year tenure.

But in a new op-ed published in The Washington Post on Wednesday, Johnson – who became the first African-American model to appear on the cover of U.S. Vogue back in 1974 – has insisted the editor-in-chief needs to do more to promote black talent at the publication as well as within her role as artistic director of publishing giant Conde Nast.

“Anna Wintour, who has been the editor in chief of Vogue for over 30 years and is currently the doyenne of Conde Nast, admitted last week to a culture of structural exclusion at Vogue and across the fashion industry. Wow – after three decades, fashion’s leading arbiter has finally acknowledged that there may be a problem!” she wrote. “Wintour is arguably the most powerful person in the world of fashion. Wintour’s power would ostensibly allow her to hold her peers in fashion accountable for making structural changes.”

Accordingly, Johnson went on to propose Wintour and her colleagues adopt the ‘Beverly Johnson Rule’ in which it will be required for executives to interview a diverse range of candidates for all positions within the firm.

“This rule would be especially relevant to boards of directors, C-suite executives, top editorial positions and other influential roles. I also invite chief executives of companies in the fashion, beauty and media industries to adopt this rule,” the 67-year-old stated.

To conclude her piece, Johnson insisted she will continue fighting against the racism and exclusion that have been “an ugly part of the beauty business for far too long”.

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Naomi Campbell divulges skincare secrets in beauty tutorial

Naomi Campbell has shared her beauty secrets in a new skincare tutorial for Vogue.In a 10-minute clip for the fashion website, the British supermodel discussed her daily regime and revealed that she has been taking care of her skin since she was a chil…

Naomi Campbell has shared her beauty secrets in a new skincare tutorial for Vogue.

In a 10-minute clip for the fashion website, the British supermodel discussed her daily regime and revealed that she has been taking care of her skin since she was a child.

“My mother always told me I had to moisturise,” Naomi explained, as she began her routine with a spritz of La Roche-Posay’s Serozinc Face Toner before running a microneedling tool across her chin, jawline, and cheekbones to maximise the effects of her products.

She followed up by mixing a serum with vitamin E oil and hyaluronic acid, which she applied to her face and neck for “shiny and dewy” skin, and then started her make-up regime with a sweep of Pat McGrath Labs’ Sublime Perfection Concealer.

“I use about three or four different colours on my skin because dark skin is that way – you can’t use one colour all over,” the 50-year-old noted, as she used the two lightest shades under her eyes and on her forehead, and a darker tone along her cheeks.

However, once Naomi got to her brows, she confessed filling them in wasn’t her best skill.

“I’m really bad at eyebrows. If you get it wrong it can be a disaster for your whole face,” she said, as she brushed them with a spoolie. “So, I’m not going to touch my eyebrows today. I’m just going to brush them and leave them because I know I will make a mess!”

And as she used NARS’ Contour blush duo along her cheekbones, jawline, and eye sockets, followed by a sweep of iridescent highlighter down the bridge of her nose, Naomi insisted that she wears far less make-up nowadays.

“When I was younger, I had so much make-up on because I thought I needed all this makeup and that’s how a model should be,” she stated. “It was all in my mind. I was thinking I had to cover every inch of skin. Anyways, things have changed.”

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Andre Leon Talley slams Anna Wintour’s diversity statement as ‘white privilege’

Andre Leon Talley has slammed Anna Wintour’s diversity statement to her staff at U.S Vogue as “white privilege”.The editor-in-chief acknowledged in a memo to staff earlier this week that she had not done enough to promote diversity and inclusivity duri…

Andre Leon Talley has slammed Anna Wintour’s diversity statement to her staff at U.S Vogue as “white privilege”.

The editor-in-chief acknowledged in a memo to staff earlier this week that she had not done enough to promote diversity and inclusivity during her 32-year tenure at the fashion publication.

Wintour admitted that “it can’t be easy to be a black employee at Vogue,” and insisted that she would be looking to educate her team on systemic racism.

However, Talley was unimpressed with the 70-year-old’s message to her staff, and called out her “white privilege” during an interview with Sandra Bernhard on her Sandyland radio show.

“The statement that she made, you know, the world of white privilege is complicated,” the former U.S. Vogue editor-at-large stated. “The statement came out of the space of white privilege.

“I wanna say one thing, Dame Anna Wintour is a colonial broad, she’s a colonial dame. She comes from British, she’s part of an environment of colonialism,” he fired. “I do not think she will ever let anything get in the way of her white privilege.”

Talley, who documented his tumultuous relationship with Wintour in his new memoir, The Chiffon Trenches, also claimed that his former friend was affected by Harper’s Bazaar hiring its first black editor-in-chief, Samira Nasr.

“That is news, groundbreaking,” Talley explained. “This has impacted (Wintour), clearly that statement comes because this girl is going to run competition rings around her, her power base has been somewhat affected by the competition of this young African-American presence who is going to be historically the first black female editor of a great, great magazine.”

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Anna Wintour admits to ‘hurtful and intolerant’ behaviour at U.S. Vogue

Anna Wintour has admitted to allowing “hurtful and intolerant” behaviour to occur at U.S. Vogue.Amidst the Black Lives Matter protests taking place around the world in the wake of the death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minnesota…

Anna Wintour has admitted to allowing “hurtful and intolerant” behaviour to occur at U.S. Vogue.

Amidst the Black Lives Matter protests taking place around the world in the wake of the death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minnesota police officers on 25 May, the fashion magazine’s editor-in-chief has issued a candid statement to her staff in which she expressed her regret over not doing enough to promote diversity and inclusivity during her 32-year tenure.

“I want to say plainly that I know Vogue has not found enough ways to elevate and give space to Black editors, writers, photographers, designers and other creators. We have made mistakes too, publishing images or stories that have been hurtful or intolerant. I take full responsibility for those mistakes,” the note, obtained by the New York Post’s Page Six, reads. “It can’t be easy to be a Black employee at Vogue, and there are too few of you. I know that it is not enough to say we will do better, but we will – and please know that I value your voices and responses as we move forward.”

Wintour went on to insist she would be looking to educate her team on systemic racism and called on her employees to reach out to her personally with their input. She also indicated that bosses at Vogue’s publisher, Conde Nast, would be making financial donations in support of anti-racism groups.

“This is a historic and heartbreaking moment for our country and it should be a time of listening, reflection, and humility for those of us in positions of privilege and authority. It should also be a time of action and commitments. On a corporate level, work is being done to support organisations in a real way,” the 70-year-old added.

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