Carolina Herrera unveils debut make-up collection

Carolina Herrera has introduced its very first collection of make-up.The luxury fashion brand, launched by Venezuela-born designer Herrera in 1980, is gearing up to make a splash in the cosmetics market with Carolina Herrera Makeup.Developed by beauty …

Carolina Herrera has introduced its very first collection of make-up.

The luxury fashion brand, launched by Venezuela-born designer Herrera in 1980, is gearing up to make a splash in the cosmetics market with Carolina Herrera Makeup.

Developed by beauty creative director Carolina A. Herrera in collaboration with head designer Wes Gordon and make-up consultant Lauren Parsons, the high-end line is comprised of lipsticks and powders, all of which come packaged in jewellery-inspired cases.

“Traditionally, make-up is something that you keep out of sight whether on your bathroom shelf or in your vanity pouch,” said Herrera, who is one of the fashion star’s daughters. “But this is an entirely new and disruptive way of approaching beauty. We wanted to give women an opportunity to flaunt their makeup, unapologetically, like a piece of fabulous jewellery.”

The lipstick line includes 38 shades in matte, satin, and sheer finishes. In addition to bright pinks, berries, corals, nudes and browns, there is the Carolina Red, a tribute to the brand founder’s signature colour.

“Bold, joyful and exuberant, red has come to symbolise everything that the Carolina Herrera universe stands for. And who better to name our truest shade of red lipstick after than Mrs. Herrera herself? Designed to be consumed without moderation, Carolina Red is your remedy to monochrome fatigue, an invitation to take a walk on the wild side,” Herrera insisted.

With regards to powders, the collection includes eight shades of enhancing and setting powders, one highlighter, and one mattifier.

“We really wanted to ensure that the finishes of each lipstick formula was pigment-rich, long-wearing and hydrating, and that the powders were as finely milled and luminous as possible to avoid any sensation of cakiness,” added Parsons.

Carolina Herrera Makeup is currently available to purchase from the Harrods department store in the U.K.

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Wes Gordon thanks Carolina Herrera for trusting him as chief designer

Carolina Herrera creative director Wes Gordon has thanked the brand’s founder for “believing” in him. In February 2018, Herrera stepped down as the creative director of her namesake label and was replaced by Gordon, who had been working as her creative…

Carolina Herrera creative director Wes Gordon has thanked the brand’s founder for “believing” in him.

In February 2018, Herrera stepped down as the creative director of her namesake label and was replaced by Gordon, who had been working as her creative consultant, and he made his debut as the company’s creative director at New York Fashion Week last September.

A year has passed since that presentation, and following his spring 2020 runway show on Monday, Gordon uploaded a picture to his Instagram page showing Herrera clutching his face and smiling backstage.

“Dear Mrs. Herrera, thank you for believing in me. One year ago, I showed my first runway collection as Creative Director of the House that you built,” he wrote in the caption. “This morning, I showed Spring 2020. Your trust, support, and faith in me is everything. You are the ultimate inspiration. Thank you (love heart emoji).”

Gordon held the spectacle in a tent resembling a glasshouse in New York’s Battery Park, with celebrity guests including actress Vanessa Hudgens and model Karlie Kloss.

During the presentation, models such as Adut Akech wore designs loyal to the brand’s roots, with the line comprised of feminine looks, white shirts, pretty red carpet dresses, ballgowns, and oversized belts.

Key pieces included floaty tulle dresses covered in velvet polka dots, voluminous white shirts paired with long skirts featuring blown out floral prints, and oversized belts.

Florals had a big presence on the catwalk, with one model wearing a strapless, floor-length dress covered in textured yellow flowers, and another sporting a white dress with oversized sleeves and a pink flower print. Polka dots were also big news, with one model rocking black and white polka dot shorts, a shirt as well as a structured jacket.

Kloss congratulated Gordon on Instagram too, and described the collection as “a vision of elegance, strength, and femininity for the modern woman.”

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Carolina Herrera accused of appropriating Mexican culture

Carolina Herrera is under fire for allegedly appropriating Mexican culture in its resort 2020 collection.The luxury brand, founded by Venezuela-born designer Herrera in 1980 and currently run by creative director Wes Gordon, unveiled the latest line – …

Carolina Herrera is under fire for allegedly appropriating Mexican culture in its resort 2020 collection.

The luxury brand, founded by Venezuela-born designer Herrera in 1980 and currently run by creative director Wes Gordon, unveiled the latest line – titled Latin Holiday – earlier this month, with the range including embroidered dresses, vibrant floral prints, sharply tailored suits and logo T-shirts.

However, Mexico’s culture secretary Alejandra Frausto has taken issue with a number of the garments, claiming in a letter sent to Spanish language newspaper El Pais that patterns in some items were unique to indigenous people in the nation.

Specifically, Frausto noted two black dresses with embroidered flowers resembled clothing made by artisans from the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, while another long white dress had needlework similar to what is produced by people in the community of Tenango de Doria in Hidalgo. Another dress appears to have been inspired by a sarape, or colourful blanket-like shawl, from Saltillo.

In addition, senator Susana Harp criticised the brand in a video posted on Twitter.

“For many years we have been trying to stop big brands and designers, who, in this disrespectful manner, take elements of indigenous cultures without approaching the communities or working with them,” she said, before going on to question whether the indigenous people would benefit from the sale of the collection in any way.

Responding to the criticism, a Carolina Herrera spokesperson issued a statement in which they insisted the designers recognised the “wonderful and diverse craft and textile work of Mexican artisans” and noted that the collection is inspired “by the culture’s rich colours and artisanal techniques”.

While in a string of Instagram posts displaying snaps of the designs, Gordon explained the line took on the “playful and colourful mood of a Latin holiday”.

“Inspired by the House spirit of alegria de vivir that is synonymous with the resort season, this collection is about visceral reactions of delight – eclectic patterns, unexpected silhouettes, pulsating energy. This is my favourite collection that I have ever been a part of, and I am so grateful to my amazing design team and the brilliant patternmakers and seamstresses who tirelessly brought it to life,” he wrote.

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Virgil Abloh and Kim Jones added to Vogue Forces of Fashion Summit

Virgil Abloh and Kim Jones have joined the 2019 Vogue Forces of Fashion Summit.The two-day event will take place in New York City on 10 and 11 October, with Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour resuming her role as host.CFDA chairman Tom Ford, Tory Burch…

Virgil Abloh and Kim Jones have joined the 2019 Vogue Forces of Fashion Summit.

The two-day event will take place in New York City on 10 and 11 October, with Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour resuming her role as host.

CFDA chairman Tom Ford, Tory Burch, Wes Gordon of Carolina Herrera, Kerby Jean-Raymond of Pyer Moss, and Proenza Schouler’s Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez are also participating.

The theme of this year’s summit, which will include Q&As, experiential sessions and group discussions, focuses on the future of fashion. According to Vogue, designers, entrepreneurs, and cultural influencers will address topics from sustainability to inclusivity in “no-holds-barred, everything’s-on-the-table” conversations.

In a chat with the fashion glossy, Off-White founder and Louis Vuitton’s menswear artistic director Abloh explained his approach to fashion.

“From the beginning, I approached the idea of design from a grassroots level,” he mused. “I removed this idea that it’s somehow detached from the consumer.

“You don’t have to sit in your studio and throw a dart and hope that it lands on the bull’s-eye. If you actually walk up to the dartboard, you can just place it in the bull’s-eye. I think that’s the success of Off-White. I haven’t made a distinction between the design world and the real world – I’ve just immersed myself in both. And because I came from outside the fashion industry, I don’t have the luxury of creating collections in a traditional way.”

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Carolina Herrera confident brand will evolve under new creative team

Carolina Herrera is confident her namesake brand will continue to evolve under her new design team.The Venezuelan fashion designer launched her company in 1980 and has since gone on to build up a reputation for dressing U.S. First Ladies, including Jac…

Carolina Herrera is confident her namesake brand will continue to evolve under her new design team.

The Venezuelan fashion designer launched her company in 1980 and has since gone on to build up a reputation for dressing U.S. First Ladies, including Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Laura Bush, Michelle Obama and Melania Trump.

Herrera announced in February (18) that she would be taking on a new role within the business, global brand ambassador, and would hand over creative control to designer Wes Gordon – a decision she’s very pleased with.

“I’m very proud to have arrived where I am now, because when you start something like this, you don’t know where it’s going to end up,” she told U.S. Vogue magazine. “I’m very glad that I decided to give it (creative reins) to Wes Gordon. He is very good and he has a very wonderful, elegant mind and he has a good eye. He trained with me for a year and I’m very happy with my decision. He’s going to follow what I did; it will be an evolution, not a revolution.”

During her interview, Herrera also spoke about the key women who helped her establish her label – former Vogue editor-in-chief Diana Vreeland and Jackie O.

“Diana Vreeland is the reason why I am doing all this. Diana was fabulous, I mean the most fabulous thing I have ever seen in my life. She was very exotic-looking and she had the youngest mind that you could imagine,” the 79-year-old shared, adding of late style icon Jackie: “She was a very cultivated woman with a fantastic mind and I mean she was reading everything – it was fantastic. She was a great inspiration, but she was a great supporter, too, she was always there for me.”

Herrera also pinpointed the creation of Jackie’s daughter Caroline Kennedy’s wedding dress as a highlight of her career and explained that she’s always loved making bridal gowns.

“People say that (the success of) Caroline’s dress was the reason that I developed bridal. No! Since the beginning, I always closed my shows with a wedding gown… because I think it’s full of hope and romance and fantasy,” she added.

Herrera will be presented with the Founder’s Award at the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) Awards next month (Jun18).

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Carolina Herrera: ‘Glamour and elegance are everything in fashion’

Carolina Herrera’s absolute belief in glamour is why she has survived and thrived in the fashion industry.The Venezuelan designer took her final bow as the creative director at eponymous label during New York Fashion Week in February, after 38 years …

Carolina Herrera’s absolute belief in glamour is why she has survived and thrived in the fashion industry.

The Venezuelan designer took her final bow as the creative director at eponymous label during New York Fashion Week in February, after 38 years at the helm.

She’s not leaving fashion altogether though, and has created a new role for herself, global brand ambassador, alongside incoming creative director Wes Gordon.

“I think to survive in this business you have to believe in something,” she smiled to The New York Times. “Make it your own and stay with it. If you want to be a designer, you have to be really sure that what you’re doing is what you really believe in. I believe in glamour. I believe in beautiful, elegant women. And I believe women become beautiful when they wear Herrera.”

Herrera got her big break after asking late Vogue editor Diana Vreeland for some career advice when she wanted to start designing textiles.

The 79-year-old was a well-known style figure in the ‘70s and ‘80s, working as a publicist for Emilio Pucci and hanging out at Studio 54 with Mick and Bianca Jagger, Andy Warhol and Vreeland.

“I came to see Diana, and I told her my story and asked whether she liked the idea (of textiles) or not. And she said, ‘My God, that’s very boring. Why don’t you do something else, connected with fashion? Why don’t you do a collection?’” she recalled.

From there, Herrera launched her namesake label with a 20-piece collection that she showed off at New York’s Metropolitan Club.

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Carolina Herrera steps down as creative director at eponymous label

Carolina Herrera’s New York Fashion Week show will be her last as creative director.On Friday (09Feb18), the 79-year-old style stalwart announced her plans to step down as the head of her namesake label. However, she was quick to clarify to The New Yor…

Carolina Herrera’s New York Fashion Week show will be her last as creative director.

On Friday (09Feb18), the 79-year-old style stalwart announced her plans to step down as the head of her namesake label. However, she was quick to clarify to The New York Times that she isn’t retiring, but rather moving roles within her own company.

As of Tuesday, she’ll helm a new role – global brand ambassador.

“Just don’t say I am retiring,” she smiled. “I am not retiring! I am moving forward.

“(I’m just not) going to wake up every day worried about where to put the sleeve, or whether the skirt should be long or short.”

Wes Gordon, who has worked as Herrera’s creative consultant for the last 11 months, has been unveiled as the incoming creative director.

“There’s something refreshing about working within a framework of a brand,” said Gordon, who put his own label on hold to consult for Herrera.

Herrera will have her swan song on Monday, with Bianca Jagger and Calvin Klein among the guests who will take in her final collection.

Explaining some of her reasons for stepping aside, Herrera, who was embroiled in a court case with Oscar de la Renta over the hiring of ex-Herrera designer Laura Kim in 2016, cited the changes in fashion for her decision.

“There’s a collection every six weeks,” she said. “They would say, ‘Can you go to the store opening in Dubai?’ ‘No, I have a show.’

“Fashion has changed a lot. What they like now is ugliness. Women dress in a very strange way. Like clowns. There is a lot of pressure to change all the time. But it’s better to wear what suits you. Add something new and you have a great look. Consistency is important.”

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