Loewe apologises for outfit resembling concentration camp uniform

Executives at Loewe have issued an apology following backlash over an outfit that resembled a concentration camp uniform.Earlier this month, Jonathan Anderson, creative director of the Spanish heritage fashion house, unveiled a collection of clothing a…

Executives at Loewe have issued an apology following backlash over an outfit that resembled a concentration camp uniform.

Earlier this month, Jonathan Anderson, creative director of the Spanish heritage fashion house, unveiled a collection of clothing and accessories influenced by the work of British ceramicist William De Morgan.

However, social media users quickly noticed an image of a suit with black and white vertical stripes and a prominent chest patch within the collection and noted that the item was similar to camp uniforms worn by victims during the Holocaust in World War II.

In response, a Loewe spokesperson apologised for any upset caused by the garments, which have been removed from sale.

“It was brought to our attention that one of our looks featured in a magazine and part of our Arts and Crafts ceramicist William De Morgan could be misconstrued as referring to one of the most odious moments in the history of mankind,” they said. “It was absolutely never our intention and we apologise to anyone who might feel we were insensitive to sacred memories. The products featured have been removed from our commercial offering.”

Other items in the De Morgan-inspired collection included coats, bags, oversized scarves, and knitwear. Garments are priced from $322 – 7,599 (£250 – £5,900).

Loewe is not the first fashion company to be criticised for selling clothing that resembled garments worn by World War II victims. In 2014, bosses at high street label Zara apologised for selling a shirt with a six-pointed yellow star on the chest designed for toddler boys that were described as a “striped sheriff T-shirt,” while in August 2017, Miu Miu executives pulled all garments from the fall/winter 2017 collection that featured five-pointed stars with men’s names embroidered them.

Critics indicated that both items resembled the six-pointed Star of David that Jewish people were forced to wear during the Holocaust.

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Loewe releases collection inspired by ceramicist William De Morgan

Loewe has unveiled a collection influenced by the work of British ceramicist William De Morgan.Jonathan Anderson, creative director of the Spanish heritage fashion house, took to Instagram on Monday morning to announce the launch of the capsule line, w…

Loewe has unveiled a collection influenced by the work of British ceramicist William De Morgan.

Jonathan Anderson, creative director of the Spanish heritage fashion house, took to Instagram on Monday morning to announce the launch of the capsule line, which includes both ready-to-wear items and accessories.

“The work of British ceramicist William De Morgan is celebrated in Loewe’s new capsule collection conceived as a world of colour, texture and playful imagination. De Morgan was renowned for his Arts and Crafts tile designs. Now, his fantastic creatures and floral arabesques are celebrated in LOEWE’s capsule collection of ready-to-wear, accessories and charms for both men and women,” he wrote alongside a campaign image. “Certain details are enlarged on coats and bags, while others are hand-stitched onto oversized scarves and knitwear. Some garments, such as a woollen dragon’s tail, or a horned knitted beanie, remake the wearer as a monster themselves. This is a collection in which the imagination is set free, and the magical is blended with the everyday.”

The campaign was shot by Craig McDean and styled by Benjamin Bruno. Models including Jamily Wernke Meurer and Marcel Korusiewicz feature in the images.

The William De Morgan capsule collection will be available to purchase from 14 November. Prices have not been announced.

And it appears the initial reaction to the concept is overwhelmingly positive, with fashion critic Tim Blanks commenting, “SUBLIME!!!!!!!” on Instagram, and model Liya Kebede adding: “So good.”

De Morgan was known for his intricate tiles, stained glass, and furniture, with his designs often based on Medieval or Islamic patterns. He died at the age of 77 in 1917.

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