Zara owner set to begin making hospital scrubs amid coronavirus crisis

Executives at Inditex, owner of Zara, are looking to begin making hospital scrubs in the face of the coronavirus pandemic.At present, Spain is one of the countries to be hit the hardest by the crisis, with over 17,000 confirmed cases and 767 deaths. Ac…

Executives at Inditex, owner of Zara, are looking to begin making hospital scrubs in the face of the coronavirus pandemic.

At present, Spain is one of the countries to be hit the hardest by the crisis, with over 17,000 confirmed cases and 767 deaths.

Accordingly, bosses at the Arteixo-headquartered company are now contemplating how textile manufacturing plants could be altered so they can start making hospital scrubs, gowns, and masks to help support the government and local health authorities.

Leaders have already donated 3,000 masks to hospitals, with a further 10,000 more due to be dispersed by the end of the week.

“We are working to bring the materials the Spanish health authorities have indicated they need most urgently: masks, gloves, protective glasses, caps, shoe covers and face shields. Inditex will lend logistical support in transporting the materials the Spanish government acquires directly from China,” a spokesperson commented, according to WWD.

On Wednesday, Inditex leaders confirmed over 3,780 stores, around half of all global locations, would be temporarily closed. They didn’t share the exact boutiques affected, but it would appear the majority are in Spain, Italy, and France, which are currently on lockdown.

Meanwhile, bosses at cosmetics giant L’Oreal have also launched a programme to aid consumers across Europe, and are increasing production of hand santiser for hospitals and pharmacies, as well as donating hygiene kits to social workers, volunteers, and beneficiaries.

“In this unprecedented crisis, it is our responsibility to contribute to the collective effort in every way possible,” said Jean-Paul Agon, chairman and chief executive officer of L’Oreal. “Through these actions, L’Oreal expresses our recognition, our support and our solidarity towards those who are demonstrating extraordinary courage and selflessness in their efforts to combat this pandemic.”

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Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge dazzles in emerald green at Irish event

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge stole the spotlight in an emerald green dress at event in Ireland on Tuesday night.The British royal and her husband Prince William have travelled to the Emerald Isle for a three-day visit, where they will make stops in …

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge stole the spotlight in an emerald green dress at event in Ireland on Tuesday night.

The British royal and her husband Prince William have travelled to the Emerald Isle for a three-day visit, where they will make stops in County Meath, County Kildare, and Galway.

Following a meeting with Irish President Michael D. Higgins, Catherine and William met with guests from across the creative arts, sport, business, and charity sectors at the Guinness Storehouse’s Gravity Bar in Dublin, where the couple ended the night by sipping on a pint.

However, it was the mother-of-three’s dress from U.K. label The Vampire’s Wife that really caught attention. Known as the Falconetti design, the number features a three-quarter length skirt and softly gathered ruffles at the hem. It is priced at $2,042 (£1,595) and currently available for pre-order online.

Catherine, 38, accessorised with Dorato earrings from H&M, a gold clutch from Wilbur & Gussie, and her go-to Manolo Blahnik velvet pointed pumps.

Accordingly, a number of royal followers were quick to praise her fashion-forward ensemble on social media, with one writing, “The Vampire’s Wife, really???! Wow, that seems so out there for her and I love it! And those funky earrings!” while another added: “She looks great! Love the green on her.”

Earlier in the day, Catherine arrived in the Irish capital in another green outfit comprised of a silk floral print pleated dress from Alessandra Rich, a forest green coat from Catherine Walker, a velvet headband from Zara, diamond earrings, and a green suede purse from L.K. Bennett.

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Loewe apologises for outfit resembling concentration camp uniform

Executives at Loewe have issued an apology following backlash over an outfit that resembled a concentration camp uniform.Earlier this month, Jonathan Anderson, creative director of the Spanish heritage fashion house, unveiled a collection of clothing a…

Executives at Loewe have issued an apology following backlash over an outfit that resembled a concentration camp uniform.

Earlier this month, Jonathan Anderson, creative director of the Spanish heritage fashion house, unveiled a collection of clothing and accessories influenced by the work of British ceramicist William De Morgan.

However, social media users quickly noticed an image of a suit with black and white vertical stripes and a prominent chest patch within the collection and noted that the item was similar to camp uniforms worn by victims during the Holocaust in World War II.

In response, a Loewe spokesperson apologised for any upset caused by the garments, which have been removed from sale.

“It was brought to our attention that one of our looks featured in a magazine and part of our Arts and Crafts ceramicist William De Morgan could be misconstrued as referring to one of the most odious moments in the history of mankind,” they said. “It was absolutely never our intention and we apologise to anyone who might feel we were insensitive to sacred memories. The products featured have been removed from our commercial offering.”

Other items in the De Morgan-inspired collection included coats, bags, oversized scarves, and knitwear. Garments are priced from $322 – 7,599 (£250 – £5,900).

Loewe is not the first fashion company to be criticised for selling clothing that resembled garments worn by World War II victims. In 2014, bosses at high street label Zara apologised for selling a shirt with a six-pointed yellow star on the chest designed for toddler boys that were described as a “striped sheriff T-shirt,” while in August 2017, Miu Miu executives pulled all garments from the fall/winter 2017 collection that featured five-pointed stars with men’s names embroidered them.

Critics indicated that both items resembled the six-pointed Star of David that Jewish people were forced to wear during the Holocaust.

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Burberry and Coach recognised at 2018 PETA Fashion Awards

Burberry and Coach are among the brands to be recognised at the 2018 PETA Fashion Awards. Each year, officials at nonprofit organisation People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) fete companies and individuals who refuse to use fur or other a…

Burberry and Coach are among the brands to be recognised at the 2018 PETA Fashion Awards. 

Each year, officials at nonprofit organisation People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) fete companies and individuals who refuse to use fur or other animal products in garments and accessories.

For the 2018 awards, PETA representatives announced that Burberry, Coach, Michael Kors, and Diane von Furstenberg made this year’s Biggest Luxury Fashion Moment by banning fur from future collections, while Helsinki Fashion Week was awarded Most Progressive Fashion Event for its decision to ban leather from its catwalks starting from next year (19).

Over 300 brands, such as Gap, Mango, H&M, Marks & Spencer, and Zara, have committed to banning mohair, resulting in the Biggest High-Street Fashion Moment, while ASOS won the Most Progressive Online Platform after executives announced that they will introduce a ban on mohair, silk, feathers, and cashmere.

In addition, leading faux-fur manufacturer Ecopel was honoured with an Innovation Award for its new faux-fur fabric made from recycled plastic bottles.

“Vegan living is now the fastest-growing lifestyle across all developed economies, and consumers are looking to purchase clothes and accessories that are consistent with their values for both animals and the planet,” said PETA Director Elisa Allen in a statement. “The fashion industry is increasingly embracing vegan fabrics, and the days of treating sentient beings as raw materials are numbered.”

Elsewhere, Save the Duck was crowned Best Down-Free Brand for its recycled outerwear free of animal fillers, Dr. Martens won the Best Vegan Boot Collection award for its vegan range, Alexandra K took home the Best Vegan Bags prize for its innovative accessories in apple leather, Felder Felder was awarded the Collaboration Award for partnering with Ecoalf on a capsule collection of coats made from recycled materials, and Jakke won the Best Wool-Free Collection award for its new range of knitwear.

And Veja, the footwear brand which rose to prominence after Meghan, Duchess of Sussex sported a pair of its sneakers to an Invictus Games event in Sydney in October, received the Best Vegan Shoe Collection prize.

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Stella McCartney, Burberry and H&M vow to cut down plastic waste

Executives at Stella McCartney, Burberry and H&M have vowed to cut down on plastic waste.In the face of the world’s plastic crisis, officials at the Ellen MacArthur Foundation have launched the New Plastics Economy Global Commitment in collaboration wi…

Executives at Stella McCartney, Burberry and H&M have vowed to cut down on plastic waste.

In the face of the world’s plastic crisis, officials at the Ellen MacArthur Foundation have launched the New Plastics Economy Global Commitment in collaboration with UN Environment, with the strategy aiming to eliminate plastic waste and pollution at the source.

In addition to McCartney, Burberry and H&M, bosses at fashion retailer Inditex – which owns Zara – have also agreed to cut back on plastic, while other companies who have committed to the initiative include Danone, L’Oreal, Mars, PepsiCo, The Coca-Cola Company, and Unilever.

“Plastic waste and pollution is one of the most pressing environmental concerns of our age,” said Burberry chief executive officer Marco Gobbetti in a statement.

While Cecilia Brannsten, environmental sustainability manager at H&M, echoed the Burberry executive’s sentiment.

“Plastic waste and pollution is a big global environmental challenge,” she commented. “There is no single brand that can tackle this industry-wide challenge on its own. We must act as one voice and the New Plastics Economy Global Commitment is a big step in the right direction, as it will align business and governments on a common agenda and time frame.”

The New Plastics Economy Global Commitment has been signed by 290 organisations, representing 20 per cent of all plastic packaging produced globally.

Targets in the scheme include the elimination of problematic or unnecessary plastic packaging, a move from single-use packaging models, ensuring 100 per cent of plastic packaging can be easily and safely reused, recycled, or composted by 2025 and circulating the plastic produced.

“We know that cleaning up plastics from our beaches and oceans is vital, but this does not stop the tide of plastic entering the oceans each year,” added Ellen MacArthur of the initiative. “We need to move upstream to the source of the flow… This is just one step on what will be a challenging journey, but one which can lead to huge benefits for society, the economy and the environment.”

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Ralph Lauren to stop using mohair in all garments

Ralph Lauren will no longer use mohair in any products.Following pressure from officials at animal rights organisation People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), representatives from the Ralph Lauren Corporation, founded by designer Ralph Laur…

Ralph Lauren will no longer use mohair in any products.

Following pressure from officials at animal rights organisation People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), representatives from the Ralph Lauren Corporation, founded by designer Ralph Lauren in 1967, have confirmed that they are ditching mohair, a silk-like fabric or yarn made from the hair of the Angora goat.

The ban will apply to all of the New York-based retail giant’s brands, including Ralph Lauren Home, Polo Ralph Lauren, Chaps, Club Monaco and American Living.

“Because a credible animal welfare standard for sourcing mohair does not currently exist, we will not include it in our product pipeline going forward,” a Ralph Lauren spokesperson said, according to The New York Post.

The decision comes after PETA campaigners conducted an expose of the mohair industry in South Africa, where more than 50 per cent of the world’s mohair is sourced. Video footage depicted shearers working quickly and carelessly, leaving angora goats with gaping wounds.

In addition, unwanted goats were slaughtered in agonising ways – with PETA’s legal team asking law enforcement agencies in the nation to investigate and file charges, as appropriate, for potential violations of the Animals Protection Act.

“PETA’s expose pulled back the curtain on the violent mohair industry, and Ralph Lauren responded by banning the cruelly produced material,” added Anne Brainard, PETA director of corporate affairs, in a statement. “Ralph Lauren has joined the growing list of fashion brands that recognise that today’s shoppers don’t support cruelty to animals in the fashion industry.”

Other fashion brands that have banned mohair include Zara, Gap, Banana Republic, H&M, Topshop, Uniqlo, Diane von Furstenberg and Brooks Brothers, among others.

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